Tomboy 2012 UNRATED

Amazon Instant Video

(46) IMDb 7.4/10
Available in HD
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A 10-year-old girl, settling into her new neighborhood outside Paris, is mistaken for a boy and has to live up to this new identity since it's too late for the mistake to be clarified.

Starring:
Zoé Héran;Malonn Lévana;Jeanne Disson
Runtime:
1 hour 23 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Tomboy

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Céline Sciamma
Starring Zoé Héran;Malonn Lévana;Jeanne Disson
Supporting actors Jeanne Disson, Sophie Cattani, Mathieu Demy, Rayan Boubekri, Yohan Vero, Noah Vero, Cheyenne Lainé, Christel Baras, Valérie Roucher
Studio Wolfe Video
MPAA rating Unrated
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

And I disagree with people who say things like "she chose to act like a boy" or "she wanted to be a boy."
Anonymous
Sciamma presents this fact in such a subtle manner that it is only in retrospect that the impact of the film is comprehended.
Grady Harp
When Laure's mother finds out what she is doing though, the way she is lying to the neighborhood kids, she is upset.
Andrew Ellington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Tomboy is an extraordinary little film from France that is really worth tracking down and seeing, partly because of the manner in which Céline Sciamma - who directed and also wrote the screenplay - has crafted a film that unfolds in such an unaffected and natural way that it feels like you're actually watching a slice of life, and partly because of the truly amazing performance by the girl, Zoé Héran, who plays the film's title character.

Because of the title, Tomboy (which is in fact the title it was originally released under in France), we know exactly what to expect. So when the film begins with what appears to be a ten-year-old boy (Zoé Héran) riding in a car with his father (Mathieu Demy), we already know that he is in fact a she, the proverbial tomboy who prefers to look and act like one of the boys. But as they head towards the new town where her family is moving to and where her mother (Sophie Cattani) and six-year-old younger sister Jeanne (Malonn Lévana) are already waiting in their new apartment, we are gradually and subtly drawn in to the illusion, particularly when the father indulgently lets the 'boy' sit in his lap and steer the car. We still know that it's a girl, but in her appearance and manner, we need no convincing that she could easily be mistaken for a boy.

When the girl (we later learn her name is Laure) starts exploring her new neighborhood, she sees a group of neighbor kids playing and goes to join them. The first one she meets is a girl her own age named Lisa (Jeanne Disson). Acting purely on an impulse, Laure introduces herself as Mikael, adopting a boy's name to go with her boyish appearance and manner. And it is as Mikael that she's accepted, crossing the gender boundary from girl to boy.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on July 11, 2012
Format: DVD
Childhood is such a tricky time in one's life. You are bombarded with feelings you don't wholly understand and these feelings can grow into something that haunts you as an adult. What should otherwise be a carefree and joyous time in one's life can become an internalized nightmare for those unable or unwilling to explore their own emotional complexities; and what child is up for that task? I am still grappling with elements of my own childhood, moments in time that confuse me still, and I'm nearly thirty years of age. While watching a film like `Tomboy' I'm literally reduced to tears because I see so much of me and so much of my own confused childhood that I can only wish for something easier for my own children.

And yet, does easy really sculpt an adult?

`Tomboy' tells the story of ten-year-old Laure. Laure, while female, choses to identify as a male. She dresses like a boy, walks like a boy, acts like a boy. She even sits like a boy. Because of this, she is mistaken by a neighbor girl named Lisa FOR a boy. Instead of correcting her, Laure tells her that her name is Mikael and from that moment forward she does everything she can to keep up the façade, not for one second assuming the consequence of being found out once school starts. Instead, she spends her summer days playing ball with the neighborhood boys and forming a crush (that is reciprocated) on Lisa. The two bond rather quickly, but there is just no avoiding the inevitable.

I'm yelling SPOILERS because I honestly cannot review this without some.

With painstaking subtlety and beauty, Celine Sciamma tackles a very delicate yet weighty subject and delivers one of the finest films of this new decade.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 28, 2012
Format: DVD
TOMBOY is a rare gem of a film. Writer/Director Céline Sciamma has created a story that is as genuinely tender about a subject that is becoming more discussed - transgender journeys - that in addition to being a film of brilliance it also demonstrates that in many ways, children deal with variations of normal better than adults. Sciamma presents this fact in such a subtle manner that it is only in retrospect that the impact of the film is comprehended.

A very loving family - the pregnant mother (Sophie Cattani), the tender father (Mathieu Demy), and two daughters - have just moved into a new neighborhood during the summer months. The younger daughter Jeanne (Malonn Lévana) is full of joy and creativity and is devoted to her older sister Laure (Zoé Héran - an extraordinary young actress). Laure dresses as a boy and going out to meet the new neighbors changes names to Michaël. Though shy and obviously fearful of how the others will perceive, Michaël is for all intents and purposes a boy. He joins in games with the other boys, meets a young girl Lisa (Jeanne Disson) who obviously is infatuated with Michaël, and retaining `his' nature as a boy he enhances his swimsuit with a creation of clay so that he will appear male to all. Lisa visits Michaël but only Jeanne is home and when Lisa asks for Michaël, Jeanne intuitively covers for Michaël. Jeanne thus wins Michaël's trust and is allowed to accompany him when he goes out to play with his new friends. Jeanne is happy to be a part of Michaël's secret. But when a fight occurs as Michaël struggles with Rayan (Rayan Boubekri) in defense of Lisa, Rayan's mother confronts Michaël's mother and Michaël's secret is out.
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