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Tomorrow Girls: Behind the Gates Paperback – May 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Lexile Measure: 680L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 211 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (May 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0545317010
  • ISBN-13: 978-0545317016
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #410,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Eva Gray lives in Chicago and enjoys reading, cooking, and camping. Though she doesn't expect to need them in the near future, Eva keeps lots of extra batteries for her flashlight and a stock of canned food in her pantry.

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Customer Reviews

I bought this book for my pre-middle school daughter, but ended up reading it the day I got it, in one sitting.
just above water
I understand that books that are meant to be the first part of a series are merely there to set the stage but then I don't really get that.
Tim Lieder
This was a good read and would probably be a good choice for girls in the 8-14 range depending on their reading and comprehension levels.
C. J. Postelli

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Postelli VINE VOICE on September 15, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is the opening book in a 4 book series. Each is told from the point of view of one of the characters. This book does a great job of setting up the premise and the characters. It takes place in a future society where everyone is given a bracelet at birth and tracked by the state. This book is told from the perspective of Louisa. She and her best friend Maddie go to the school together (pretending to be twins). At the school they meet the other 2 characters, Rosie and Evelyn. Each girl has a distinctive personality and the bonds of friendship are tested as they face the struggles of dealing with adolescence and the real purpose of their attendance at the school. They are just being kept there for safety reasons, right? The answer to that question is the main plot of the book and as the girls search for answers, they must face their own and each other's problems and insecurities. This was a good read and would probably be a good choice for girls in the 8-14 range depending on their reading and comprehension levels. When I finished it I let my 10 year old neighbor read it. She completed it in one day and now she wants the remainder of the series!!!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is the first of four books about four girls living in the near future, a time when the US is locked in an endless war with the shadowy Alliance. Each book is told from the POV of a different girl, this one through the eyes of Louisa, a well-to-do thirteen year old who can't imagine what life was like as her parents tell it -- when people drove their own cars and actually visited other states, when people had privacy and no one wore identity bracelets from the moment they were born. Louisa's world is much different, where even the moderately well off live lives of deprivation and uncertainty as the War drags on and kids are shipped off to schools far away from home, with no one told where they are, just "to keep them safe". Safety concerns are used to cover a multitude of governmental sins in this dystopia, though we don't get much specific information about the situation. Perhaps this will lend itself to a timeless quality as the book ages?

And now it's time for Louisa to go off to school. She's both scared and excited at this chance to get away from her protective parents. And bonus, they've managed to trick the ID bracelet of her best friend Maddie, whose parents are both off fighting, so the girls can go to school together, pretending to be twins. When they arrive at the Country Manor School, Louisa loves it. She's making new friends and finding herself successful at a a variety of survival skills like archery, riflery and orienteering. Maddie, however, resents the school's premise that these elite (ie, wealthy) kids are the future leaders of the country, and she hangs out with the school's misfits, including one girl who's convinced that something sinister is going on. And maybe she's not far off base ....
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Crystal Watanabe on October 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was sent to me by Scholastic for review since I work for a Hunger Games fansite.

I tried to keep in mind that this book isn't aiming to be the best thing ever written, since it's obvious with the way it's written that it's aimed at a much younger crowd than The Hunger Games. For that age group, I feel like it provides decent entertainment and good tidbits about survival-ism to kids. That being said, the quality of the writing is low enough that I don't think adults would enjoy it, maybe not even teenagers. People looking for another Hunger Games will need to go into this knowing it's not going to live up to their expectations.

The story centers around four thirteen year old girls, Louisa, Rosie, Maddie, and Evelyn, living in a world struck by pollution and war. They get sent off to the country to attend Country Manor School where they will be trained in outdoor skills needed to survive in their world today. By the end of the novel, they find themselves in the midst of their country's war and must decide how to act in their predicament.

Taking away my excuses for the book's target age, the story is weak and at times simply doesn't make sense. The war isn't very detailed, probably intentionally, and the whole premise of the air being so disgusting in the cities really makes absolutely no sense when you take into account the miles of forest they pass as they travel to CMS. If there's so much wilderness left, why do people still live in Chicago? If the pollution and war is that bad, how are there any forests left?

Even so, I gave it three stars because I think my daughter would love to read this next year (she's currently 7). If she liked it, I'd happily buy her the next so that I could read it because I care enough about the characters to want to know more. She's too young to understand The Hunger Games, but I feel like this would be right around her speed in third grade. I probably read this in about four hours or less.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Aimee Brown on May 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
Louisa and her best friend, Maddie, are off on a new adventure. At least, that's how Louisa views it. Her parent's wealth has bought her a place at the new boarding school called Country Manor. With Maddie posing as her twin sister instead of her best friend, the two girls are allowed to stay together. Nobody knows where Country Manor is and there is no communication allowed with family but nobody questions the governments stand that these rules will "keep you safe".

Country Manor isn't perfect or easy. The girls have strict rules and classes that test their endurance and survival skills. Luisa loves the challenge though. She is doing things she has never had the opportunity to do before and finding that there are many things she can do very well. Louisa loves the fresh air and the new friends while Maddie seems to struggle with everything. Maddie seems to think that everything is not as it seems and something is really wrong with Country Manor but Louisa doesn't want to listen. Will Louisa catch on before it's too late?

This dystopian adventure really surprised me. I honestly wasn't expecting too much from it, but I really enjoyed reading it! It is one of the better JF books I've read this year. I love Louisa's enthusiasm as she is given new experiences and opportunities that her government has repressed her whole life. The girls in this book are young- about 13 or so, and the attitudes and ideas of this age are very accurately represented. The book I read is an uncorrected proof and it is labeled for a juvenile fiction audience. The actual book, just released this month (May 2011) is labeled YA, but I find the content and reading level appropriate for about 5th grade and up. I really think my younger girls are going to enjoy reading this series. I especially appreciated that the book was free from swearing and sexual content.
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