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Tones of Town

9 customer reviews

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Audio CD, February 13, 2007
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$16.87
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Vinyl, Import, January 23, 2007
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$16.87 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Field Music covered a lot of ground in 2006. The trio from Sunderland, England (songwriters Peter and David Brewis and keyboard manipulator Andrew Moore) toured the continent, playing with Belle and Sebastian, Architecture in Helsinki and UK compadres Maximo Park and The Futureheads, performed at both the Reading and Leeds Festivals, and traveled to the US where they were the surprise hit of SXSW. They also invented a dance craze (according to English tabloid The News of the World); etched one side of a 7-inch with a list of things you shouldn't do but probably already have; released a B-sides collection featuring a brief and inaccurate history of pre-Field Music experiments; and somehow found time to record their second album proper. Whereas their eponymous debut was played and executed with care -- dryly produced, ambitiously skewed, multilayered, and engineered to gradually reveal intricacies over repeated listens -- Tones of Town pushes and scratches at the boundaries of their debut, moving in several directions at once, and taking big risks.

Review

It's unpredictable, ridiculously clever, catchy as hell and as perfect a pop album as you're ever likely to hear. 10/10 -- Drowned In Sound, January 22, 2007

1. Give It Lose It Take It
2. Sit Tight
3. Tones of Town
4. A House Is Not A Home
5. Kingston
6. Working To Work
7. In Context
8. A Gap Has Appeared
9. Closer At Hand
10. Place Yourself
11. She Can Do What She Wants

Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 13, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Memphis Industries
  • ASIN: B000LPR56Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,094 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Cale E. Reneau on February 14, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As a reviewer, one of the most difficult things to do is review an album that you're entirely infatuated with. It would be easy to rant on and on about how great an album is without pointing out it's flaws or shortcomings. And here I find myself with Field Music's newest release. I am not familiar with their previous work, so I'm beginning with a fresh slate here. However, I cannot get over the greatness of "Tones of Town." In many ways, it is a perfect album, stringing together 11 solid pop songs effortlessly, and completely enthralling me in the process.

Why would I call it perfect? Because these songs are all really great, and there's really not one song that I could do away with on the album. Whether it's the heavy guitars of "Give It Lose It Take It," the playful melodies of "A House is Not a Home," or the haunting harmonies of "Kingston," there's not a moment on this album that fails to impress. Every song is rich with complexty without foregoing a steady, upbeat pop feel. Take "Tones of Town," for example, a song that merrily floats along in the beginning but eventually erupts with distorted guitars and vocals, only to melt away into a friendly bopping guitar solo before it's over. Field Music is a very talented group, but unlike so many other talented bands, they're immediately accessible. They're not going to beat you over the head with complex riffs, and mind-boggling melodies. The mere fact that they can fully display their vast talents while still being fun is awesome.

In "Working to Work," the singer nonchalantly notes, "Leisure is useless when you find that nothing ain't easy when you're working to work" over a steady guitar and drum beat. It's a great song, and one that you'll probably find yourself singing along to after just a few listens.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Music maven on December 12, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Normally, I would be outraged to buy a CD and find that it's only 31 minutes long. It would be like buying an LP with sound on only one side. But in this case, I don't give the length a second thought. Each individual song here is richer than any full hour-long CD by most bands, and at the end of 31 minutes your head is reeling with how far you've come.

The remarkable thing is how nothing in any song goes where you expect it to go. The melodies flow along for a time and then go skittering off down some alley, only to dart into a doorway you didn't realize was there, and the song structures are just as unpredictable, shifting tempo, harmonic framework, and feel three or four times within a 3-minute song (trust me, there's no way the 30-second clips here can even begin to suggest what's going on with these songs). Yet you never get the sense that these guys are doing it to show off how tricky they can be; there's not a nerdy atom in the recording. It's more like they're simply following the song where it wants to go. And when you hear them do it, you realize how virtually every other band around is, to one degree or another, taking the song where they think you want it to go, or where they think tradition or image or the market wants it to go. Even bands that aim at breaking new ground aim at it. These guys break new ground by getting out of the way--they hatch the song and then let it discover the world on its own. But they never put a foot wrong. Even as each moment on the CD seems spontaneously discovered, each note seems to have been carefully considered and specifically chosen for maximum impact.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dan Dreifort on February 28, 2009
Format: Audio CD
An excellent collection of songs about relationships, but not the boy-meets-girl kind. Think: "How do we relate to the world?" and ponder the song titles on this UK act's sophomore effort. "A House is not a Home," "Place Yourself," "Working to Work." And if you want a new spin on progrock, note the decidedly progressive "Give It Lose It Take It," a song that unfolds like the mating of Ben Folds and Yes. (Gross! Don't picture it. Imagine it in your ears!) Fun orchestration and tasteful strings over quirky rhythmic piano create a great indie-rock soundscape.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cale E. Reneau on February 14, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As a reviewer, one of the most difficult things to do is review an album that you're entirely infatuated with. It would be easy to rant on and on about how great an album is without pointing out it's flaws or shortcomings. And here I find myself with Field Music's newest release. I am not familiar with their previous work, so I'm beginning with a fresh slate here. However, I cannot get over the greatness of "Tones of Town." In many ways, it is a perfect album, stringing together 11 solid pop songs effortlessly, and completely enthralling me in the process.

Why would I call it perfect? Because these songs are all really great, and there's really not one song that I could do away with on the album. Whether it's the heavy guitars of "Give It Lose It Take It," the playful melodies of "A House is Not a Home," or the haunting harmonies of "Kingston," there's not a moment on this album that fails to impress. Every song is rich with complexty without foregoing a steady, upbeat pop feel. Take "Tones of Town," for example, a song that merrily floats along in the beginning but eventually erupts with distorted guitars and vocals, only to melt away into a friendly bopping guitar solo before it's over. Field Music is a very talented group, but unlike so many other talented bands, they're immediately accessible. They're not going to beat you over the head with complex riffs, and mind-boggling melodies. The mere fact that they can fully display their vast talents while still being fun is awesome.

In "Working to Work," the singer nonchalantly notes, "Leisure is useless when you find that nothing ain't easy when you're working to work" over a steady guitar and drum beat. It's a great song, and one that you'll probably find yourself singing along to after just a few listens.
Read more ›
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