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Too Old to Rock 'N' Roll: Too Young to Die


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Vinyl, 1976
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Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: Chrysalis
  • ASIN: B005KSRKA0
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,693,658 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Music

Image of album by Jethro Tull

Photos

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Videos

Thick As A Brick 2 Video Trailer

Biography

Early in 1968, a group of young British musicians, born from the ashes of various failed regional bands gathered together in hunger, destitution and modest optimism in Luton, North of London. With a common love of Blues and an appreciation, between them, of various other music forms, they started to win over a small but enthusiastic audience in the various pubs and clubs of Southern England. ... Read more in Amazon's Jethro Tull Store

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I disagree completely with the two earlier reviewers opinions. This is truely a superbly crafted Tull album, full of musically intriguing complexity. The acoustic numbers (eg. Bad-Eyed and Loveless) feature some of Ian Anderson's best playing ever! The lyrics are fascinating, too. Obviously, the earlier reviewers did not give this album the requisite multiple listenings that typical Tull albums require...
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Format: Audio CD
While this album was supposedly a concept album, it takes a lot of effort to follow the story. This album also departs from Tull's usual styling, which is an unusual comment given that I have emphasized in other reviews of Tull CDs that Tull has always followed their own musical path.

"Quizz Kid" starts out mellow and slow with strings and an easy electric guitar riff. However, indicative of the punk age of the time, bass and electric guitar riffs push themselves to the front, and this song sounds like a punk-influenced hard rock song. The lyrics are about going on a game show with the hopes of winning big.

"Crazed Institution" does not try to mislead you. From the very beginning the beat of this song speaks rock. By this song you are under the impression that Ian Anderson was striving for a harder edge on this album as compared to Tull's earlier folk-flavored offerings. The lyrics in this song are about celebrity and fame and the insanity that such status causes a person's life.

"Salamander" provides the first real flavor of Jethro Tull as the group had been known up to this time. Clever acoustic guitar picking takes you halfway through the piece until a heavily echoed Ian Anderson brings on the vocals. The contrast between the acoustic and folk-flavored instruments and the echoed voice is interesting and makes me wish that Ian had explored this song in greater depth.

From a lyrical viewpoint, "Taxi Grab" is a relatively lightweight offering, and is not a fan favorite. From a musical viewpoint, this song is a rocker, bass and harmonica driven, a blues-flavored hard rock song. The music is pretty good, but the weak lyrics detract a bit.

"From a Dead Beat to an Old Greaser" begins in a traditional Tull style, dirge-like and acoustic.
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Format: Audio CD
An often underappreciated album, "Too old to rock and roll, Too Young to die" is one of Jethro Tull's most substantial, deep, solid, significant works. One of Ian Anderson's "theme albums", it represents the tribulations of Ray Lomas, a comic-book working-class hero who many critics at the time believed to be Ian Anderson's alter ego. In a stroke of genius similar to the cover of "Thick as a Brick", the theme of the album is presented in an amusing comic book form relating to the album songs.
This is the first album after the departure of bassist Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond, who was replaced by John Glascock. He joined Ian Anderson (vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, harmonica), Martin Barre (lead guitar), John Evan (keyboards), and Barriemore Barlow (percussion) in what was arguably Tull's greatest ensemble.
As for the music, the style is the quintessential Ian Anderson brilliance, with a mixture of brassy, compact, fast-paced pieces like "Quizz kid", "Crazed Institution", and "Taxi Grab", with lyrical acoustic pieces like "Salamander" and "From a deadbeat to an Old Greaser". The title song, "Too old to rock and roll, Too young to die" has for years been the subject of controversy among Tull fans, some believing it to be too slow and even dull, others saying it is representative of the remarkable mixture of styles that characterizes not only the Album but all of Jethro Tull.
Most fans and connoisseurs would agree that "Big Dipper" and especially "Pied Piper" are among Tull's most carefree, playful, lighthearted creations. Ian Anderson was always a master at varying and adjusting moods even within a coherent, thematic album like "Too Old to rock and roll, Too Young to die".
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By A Customer on August 26, 1999
Format: Audio CD
The first side of this album is basically pretty good in a straightforward rock kind of way, but nowhere near as interesting as Songs from the Wood or even Minstrel in the Gallery. Quizz Kid and Taxi Grab move along very nicely and up to From a dead beat... are pretty good, after that it becomes rather dull with mushy strings (an unfortunate characteristic of Ian at times). The title track is a good song but better heard live. A surprisingly straight album and much the worse for that. `Minstrel' suffers from similar problems but has some outstandingly loud rock tracks which are amongst Tull's best which elevates it above this effort.
It should be pointed out that this is a kind of concept album in which the hero gets steadily older and more wasted and the music reflects this. In 'Bursting Out', the live JT album, Ian amused us with the comment that people assumed that the Too Old track was talking about him, but that in fact he was "talking about some other bastard". Great days, but disappointing effort.
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