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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-Researched addition to Civil War History
As someone with a Ph.D. in American Southern History, I found this book very interesting and well researched. It is a great addition to Civil War scholarship. Anya Jabour recounts what children said about the war and sectional politics before, during, and after the fighting. Jabour discusses how children's work and play were effected by warfare. She quotes diaries,...
Published on April 26, 2012 by K. Obernuefemann

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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars More Slander Heaped Upon the South
Another fine example of communist brainwashing at work on the young minds of America. This author has no clue about our true history, but continues the slanderous rant against the South, our culture, and heritage. If the author would have bothered to research the truth, this book of mythology would never have been written. There are many accurate, well written books...
Published 9 months ago by freedixie


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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-Researched addition to Civil War History, April 26, 2012
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This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
As someone with a Ph.D. in American Southern History, I found this book very interesting and well researched. It is a great addition to Civil War scholarship. Anya Jabour recounts what children said about the war and sectional politics before, during, and after the fighting. Jabour discusses how children's work and play were effected by warfare. She quotes diaries, letters, newspapers, etc. to give first-hand accounts of children black and white, well-off and poor, who tell what they thought about the fighting, how their chores changed, the songs they sang, and how their schools supported the war effort.

The author has no "agenda." A previous reviewer argued that the Northerners had slaves too. That is true, but it is not relevant to the book's topic -- the war years. (I would also argue the reviewer's comment about Lincoln having a "Marxist" agenda.)

I highly recommend this book. It is both scholarly and very readable.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, April 4, 2013
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This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
I was so impressed with this book I actually sent an email to the author. This Civil War info is not boring or dull. It is alive and interesting and readable.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars More Slander Heaped Upon the South, November 4, 2013
This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
Another fine example of communist brainwashing at work on the young minds of America. This author has no clue about our true history, but continues the slanderous rant against the South, our culture, and heritage. If the author would have bothered to research the truth, this book of mythology would never have been written. There are many accurate, well written books which correctly tell of our history, such as the following: "The Real Lincoln", by Charles L.C. Minor, "The South Was Right", by James Ronald Kennedy and Walter Donald Kennedy, "Red Republicans and Lincoln's Marxists" by Walter D. Kennedy and Al Benson, Jr., "The Un-Civil War" by Leonard M. Scruggs, "Truths of History", by Mildred Lewis Rutherford (1920), "Facts and Falsehoods Concerning the War on the South 1861-1865", by George Edmunds, "Myths of American Slavery" by Donnie Kennedy, and "Complicity-How the North Promoted, Prolonged, and Profited from Slavery", by Anne Farrow. Don't waste your time on the drivel of Jabour, but invest your time in the above mentioned books if the truth is what you seek.
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bilge, November 5, 2013
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James Morgans (TIJERAS, NM, US) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
Nothing but froth from another "academic" who spews politically-correct but factually-barren claptrap without knowing the first snippet of truth concerning this most tragic time in American history. Even if it were being sold as a novel (which it more closely resembles), this poorly-conceived and shakily-written waste of trees can only be savored by those with absolutely no knowledge of what actually happened from 1650-1865 in Africa and America who wish to remain glassy-eyed and foggy-brained, and will believe anything anybody with a twisted agenda tells them. Glad I didn't spend money on this negligent ride through Fairy Land.
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Hogwash, May 13, 2013
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This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
I bought this book for my fifth daughter's homeschool, but didn't use it after my reading showed it to be just one more liberal's fantasy.
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6 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Critique of Topsy Turvy, September 12, 2011
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This review is from: Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children (American Childhoods Series) (Hardcover)
I bought Topsy Turvy under the impression that it would be a book of true history. Instead, its contents live up to its cover, a cover which captures a drawing from Uncle Tom's Cabin, a hate-stirring novel by another imaginative female novelist I have now concluded the reading of Jabour's work dealing with the "same old, same old--same song, millionth verse."- Jabour's book is just another echo of all that politically correct historians have spewed forth since Lincoln, his Marxist buddies, and their newly imported, hired guns, non-English speaking foreigners destroyed the heart and brain of America and converted the Republic with its Constitutional law into a joke called Karl Marx's Democracy .

Jabour does sprinkle a few historical facts about on the pages of her "hysterical novel," but for the most part she writes not for readers seeking truth, but for the liberated, beguiled women in "women gender" history classes. Those students are programmed to appreciate her digs at white Southern children and their supposedly horrifically prejudiced, slave-torturing mamas. Can it be that Jabour does not know that northern slave owners, once they acquired white bondsmen (slaves, really) and bonds-kids or Scot and Irish folks to work for pennies in their factories, dumped (for bucks) their black slaves on the South? Those northern factory owners needed Southern cotton--so of course the north benefited by exporting black slaves south.

Jabour does not confess this truth. Her research may not have been thorough enough to reveal it. She seems to have depended only on the "approved" findings of other not too honest researchers and writers out to make a buck. She may not even know that northerners owned both white slaves and black ones and were harsh owners--undoubtedly more harsh than were 99.8 percent of Southern owners of blacks. Jabour's failure to research and mention northerners' slavery role is not surprising-- books reporting hideous treatment of the north's slaves neither sell nor earn academic distinctions for their authors.

There are even today vast numbers of northerners who have no knowledge that there was a slave plantation once in the very heart of New York (revealed by recently discovered skeletons). Jabour may be unaware that the slave ships were only northern ones-- not Southern ships--and those northern ships never flew a Confederate flag. The U.S. flag is the flag of slavery, just as is the British flag, the Danish flag, the Italian flag, the Spanish flag--practically all the flags of all the nations in the world, including South American flags and flags of African nations and lands inhabited by Muslims. The flags of all these nations once flew over slave ships.

Evidently Jabour does not know Louisiana had thousands of freed black people years before Mr. Lincoln's term of office--and that Louisiana's free blacks were educated and prosperous. Is it not odd how the wildly acclaimed historians seem so unaware that emancipation began in the South long before the Marxists and their buddies, the crazed abolitionists, started the Republican Party?

Jabour makes quite a big deal contending that white daughters of Confederate mothers merely reflected a parent's perverted views. Children can absorb parental beliefs? What an earth-shaking, psychological revelation! -

It follows then that Jabour must conclude the daughters of the morally superior northerners, also, mirrored the beliefs of their parents and thus, the children of some northern preachers thought, as did their papas, that all Southern preachers should be hung by the neck until dead. (Marxist propagandists were experts!) General Sherman and Mrs. Sherman's kids, then, must have believed that all Southern women and children (of a certain class) should be eliminated--and the entire South turned into ashes. General Grant (a Marxist approved U.S. President) and his family held black slaves even after the end of the U.S. war. Does this mean the Grant children thought slavery o.k.? Members of Mr. Lincoln's U.S. Senate voted to torture helpless Confederate prisoners, starve them to death, have them shot, freeze them, etc. --so must we believe that the children, grandchildren, great grandchildren, etc. of those men agreed that prisoners should be tortured if they were Southerners? (To think that some northerners today have complained about prisoners having their heads dipped in buckets!)

A Southern holocaust and cultural genocide was created by noble northerners, so, Jabour must conclude that the north's children reflecting their parents' views believed the holocaust in the South and the genocide there perfectly justified-- in fact, hunky dory! If that kind of thinking is not topsy turvy, what is?

The Communist brainwashing goes on and on and comes out here--in the Jabour text.

I consider the Jabour book nothing more than another hate-mongering work of the very type created back in the 1800's by skilled Marxist-Communist propagandists. Perhaps Jabour is an innocent who thinks she is telling the truth, but she is merely repeating the exact lies circulated by the hundreds of 1848ers (Communists) who wrote propaganda for northern newspapers and journals as part of the continuation in America of their failed Socialist Revolution in Europe. Karl Marx, himself, wrote regularly for the New York Tribune, does Jabour know that?
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