Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Torso: A True Crime Graphic Novel Paperback – February 19, 2001


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$11.79
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.33 $13.97

Pieces of My Mother by Melissa Cistaro
Pieces of My Mother by Melissa Cistaro
Check out the newest book by Melissa Cistaro. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Image Comics (February 19, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582406979
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582406978
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 6.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,086,099 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This chilling, noir-inflected true American crime tale concerning Cleveland's so-called "Torso Murders" (because that's usually what was found) is presented here in gritty art crafted with black and white graphics, infused with actual crime scene photos in a simple layout and is almost on par with From Hell as far as "true crime" graphic novel story-telling goes.

For those who are unaware of what happened with Eliot Ness's career after Al Capone, Torso tells the story of the incredibly shocking and horrifying events in the 30s unfolded at the creepy and desolate Kingsbury Run, which was the grisly playground of the "Mad Butcher" from 1934 until 1938 and accounts the gripping hunt for the Ohio serial killer who was officially never named.

The Cleveland Torso Murders, most of which the victims were brutally killed by decapitation while alive, were some of the most sensational crimes and were never solved.

This is the story of how newly-appointed director of public safety, Eliot Ness realises that hunting this killer was not like battling organised crime.

Bendis's delivery has a good pace, a lot of attention to detail, and there is an interesting sub-plot about a gay cop who has something to say on the matter of whether the killer was sexually perverted due to his equal number of female and male victims during a time when homosexuality was largely considered a "perversion". I really found this specific exploration of social issues part of the appeal of Bendis's telling of this sensational and super creepy unsolved mystery.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Reason for Reading: I was posting my review for "Green River Killer" on one of my book sites and this was recommended for me. I immediately knew I had to read it.

I'm pretty savvy in this field but admit I didn't know anything about this case. I've heard the moniker "The Torso Killer" before but knew nothing of the details. Billed here as America's first serial killer, that is pure hype. The Torso Killer went on his spree in the mid-1930s and I can think of at least one earlier American serial killer who worked during the late 1890s Dr. HH Holmes aka The Beast of Chicago. But putting that aside, this is still a very early serial killer case, before the days when police really knew how to handle this type of crime and the case went unsolved, and remains so to this day. Elliot Ness, was slightly involved in this case but history has added him to be much more directly involved than he actually was.

This book takes the actual events surrounding the case and adds artistic license to imagine a possible scenario and solution to the murders which heavily involves Ness. It is a gripping story, which I found fascinating and had me looking up the actual facts once I'd finished reading. There is a plethora of contemporary material still available at museums and in archives from the case but the actual police crime files have disappeared. The artwork is quite amazing, though it may not be to everyone's taste. I must say, I was really taken with it. Done in black and white, we have a mixture of medias as both illustration and photographs are combined throughout. Sometimes a photographic background is used upon which the characters are drawn and sometimes contemporary photographs of the times are used as frames within the comic. It is highly stylized art.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. Norder on November 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
I almost gave up on this a couple of different times thanks to artwork and page layouts that were completely amateurish. Most of the characters don't even look the same from panel to panel so that you lose track of which person is which. The only times they are recognizable is when they are exact copies of a prior illustration and in which the character is posing in a way that doesn't fit what is supposed to be happening to them -- frequently on the same page. If you've seen the comic strip Red Meat or some others where the same picture is in each panel with only new words coming out of their mouths, it's pretty similar to this. Plus there are several times when you are suddenly expected to turn the orientation of the book to continue reading the rest of the page. I'm sure this was done with the belief that it would help keep the reader's interest and make it seem more dramatic, but it had the opposite effect.

As far as the story goes, it's pretty basic. It tries to follow the facts of the case for a while, but in a rather lackluster and tedious way. The only time any suspense is established it's for a part that was completely made up in an absurdly cliched way with the heroes confronting the supposed villain. In the real world, the true perpetrator was never caught and no evidence other than wild speculation about who it might have been. Here they make it clear who the killer supposedly was and catch him red handed. This book's publicity claims it was "what really happened," but nothing at all like this ever took place. I'd chalk the claim up to just overzealous marketing, but unfortunately it's clear that many readers don't know this part was fabricated and the notes at the end do not clearly spell it out, insisting that they got the real killer. This comic book even somehow managed to win an award for journalism in the city it was based in, believe it or not. Perhaps they're just really hurting for solid news writing there.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?