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5.0 out of 5 stars The Spooling of a Simple Thing
I cried at the end of this novel, and I'm not sure how to feel about that. This isn't the first time this has happened to me, but it certainly took me off guard. It was one of those gaspy, breathless spells that keeps you from talking or explanation to your girlfriend why you've suddenly broken down at a Starbucks. This was my first novel from T.C. Boyle, but it has since...
Published 14 months ago by Patrick Garrett York

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3.0 out of 5 stars America's Racial Divide
Delaney Mossbacher is haunted by the accident: he hits a poor migrant on the road to Delaney’s secluded mountaintop road. He stops the car and looks for the man, finally finding him in the weeds of the canyon. The man, who doesn’t speak English, appears to refuse help, so Delaney gives him $20 and goes on his way. Delaney lives with his wife, a very successful...
Published 1 month ago by Patricia Hagerty


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Spooling of a Simple Thing, July 30, 2013
This review is from: The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback)
I cried at the end of this novel, and I'm not sure how to feel about that. This isn't the first time this has happened to me, but it certainly took me off guard. It was one of those gaspy, breathless spells that keeps you from talking or explanation to your girlfriend why you've suddenly broken down at a Starbucks. This was my first novel from T.C. Boyle, but it has since inspired me to read Riven Rock, The Women, and San Miguel. though they were all immersive reads, none of them dried out my throat in the same way this one did. Two words collide--one affluent, one drunk in the dirt--and over time, their connection grows ferociously until the complex relationship between those on the outside and those building walls spools entirely.
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3.0 out of 5 stars America's Racial Divide, August 21, 2014
This review is from: The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback)
Delaney Mossbacher is haunted by the accident: he hits a poor migrant on the road to Delaney’s secluded mountaintop road. He stops the car and looks for the man, finally finding him in the weeds of the canyon. The man, who doesn’t speak English, appears to refuse help, so Delaney gives him $20 and goes on his way. Delaney lives with his wife, a very successful real estate salesperson, and her son, and his only job is to write/blog about nature in the Topanga Canyon region. Meanwhile Candido, the injured man, is unable to work for days, and has no money to support his common-law wife America, who finally goes to work herself, cleaning artifacts with harsh chemicals and working for a man who pays her only $25 for long days. Thus author Boyle sets up the contrast between the wealthy in their hilltop walled neighborhood and the migrants who have only irregular work and no security, living in a little makeshift camp in the Canyon. Delaney, who has prided himself on his liberal values, becomes increasingly terrified of danger at the hands of angry migrants. Candido, despite a willingness to do any work, is too often the victim of crooks or weather or “the system.” Boyle shifts back and forth between the two couples, one concerned with survival and the other with protecting their fine life. This parallel reflects all the U.S. arguments over the “migrant problem,” and presents no solutions (of course, no easy solutions exist). In the climax, heavy rains wash away the canyon camp and the couple’s blind baby, along with many people in the canyon. Candido (a survivor who retains humanity despite being broken) reaches out to rescue a white man (we presume Delaney) from death in the flood (think Noah?).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, June 9, 2014
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This review is from: The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback)
A great book. It held my attention from the beginning to the end. It highlights the moral dilemma between the haves and have nots.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Tortilla Curtain, February 9, 2014
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This review is from: The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback)
The Tortilla Curtain held my attention throughout the story. Causes the reader to search their opinions on their thoughts of cause and effect of their own discriminations.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, September 15, 2014
This review is from: The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback)
Awesome read!
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The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle
The Tortilla Curtain [Paperback] [1996] T. Coraghessan Boyle by T. Coraghessan Boyle (Paperback - September 1, 1995)
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