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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Restoring the Christian Mind
Christians in North America tend to view their Christianity strictly in terms of their individual commitment to Jesus Christ, and they see their part in the Great Commission as sharing their faith and bringing others also into such a saving relationship. Yet they are frustrated by a feeling of having their hands tied, of unspoken assumptions which they may sense but not...
Published on January 10, 2010 by Randy A. Stadt

versus
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Some Gems in a Lot of Rough
I debated whether or not this should be a two or three star review before eventually deciding that Pearcy's good points were tertiary to her intent. Thus, I felt like what could have been fair was less than.

However, it's difficult to rate this book in the first place considering that it felt like three or four books ranging from decent to atrocious. Still, it...
Published on January 4, 2013 by Matthew R. Green


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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Restoring the Christian Mind, January 10, 2010
By 
Randy A. Stadt (Edmonton, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
Christians in North America tend to view their Christianity strictly in terms of their individual commitment to Jesus Christ, and they see their part in the Great Commission as sharing their faith and bringing others also into such a saving relationship. Yet they are frustrated by a feeling of having their hands tied, of unspoken assumptions which they may sense but not be able to put their finger on. More than in any other nation, professing American evangelicals make up a sizable percentage of the population, but in terms of cultural impact, they are almost invisible. Nancey Pearcey argues that this is because they have implicitly accepted a secular/sacred divide which keeps the power of the gospel locked up, like a caged lion. Her purpose is to give us the tools to recognize where and how this has happened, so that by liberating Christianity from its cultural captivity, it may become a redemptive force that really permeates our culture.

The cultural captivity that Pearcey refers to is the banishment of Christian ideas to the private sphere of values and subjective feelings, and out of the public sphere of facts, objective knowledge, and science. This two-tiered division of truth that our culture (and many Christians) accepts results in both the truth claims of Christianity not being taken seriously since they are not seen as belonging to the realm of knowledge, and in Christians themselves not knowing how to integrate their faith to the whole of reality. Worse, evangelicals (conservative Bible-believing Christians) have gone from dominating the culture of the nineteenth century, to being completely marginalized today. And it is largely their own fault.

Though they controlled all the cultural institutions at that time, nineteenth century evangelicals, as a result of the First and Second Great Awakenings, had come to view Christianity primarily in terms of non-cognitive categories of emotion and experience. Their religious beliefs were still an integral part of their "lower story" activities such as science, but because they did not view their Christianity as "total truth", a worldview which orders all of reality, they could not recognize the threat of competing worldviews which came along at that time. When the Baconian view of science that Enlightenment intellectuals had become intoxicated with, promised that knowledge could be based on bare empirical facts, unfiltered through any religious or philosophical grid, Christians were persuaded to set aside their own religious framework. But this view of science, or any other activity, as religiously neutral, is false, and so the withdrawal of Christian presuppositions created a vacuum that was quickly filled by alien philosophical frameworks, namely naturalism and empiricism. These were introduced under the banner of "objectivity" and "free inquiry" whereas Christian views were seen as biased. As a result Christian perspectives were driven out of the lower story to the upper, where they have remained to this day.

"It is nothing less than tragic that Christians themselves were partly responsible for the privatizing of religion", Pearcey notes. Then and even today, many embraced as perfectly reasonable the subsequent principle of methodological naturalism, thinking that it was simply a refinement of scientific practice to limit the scope of investigation of the natural world to natural explanations. They did not recognize that this opened the door to metaphysical naturalism. "After all, if you can interpret the world perfectly well without reference to God, then His existence becomes a superfluous hypothesis." Historian George Marsden is quoted as saying that "the naturalistic definition of science was transformed from a methodology into a dominant academic worldview."

All worldviews, Christian and non-Christian, seek to provide an overarching metanarrative that answer the questions of Creation, Fall, and Redemption. The worldview of naturalism, that the natural world is all there is, has been around since the ancient Greeks. But it never really caught on because it was not able to answer the fundamental question of Creation without smuggling in concepts from a theistic worldview. Darwinian evolution finally provided this creation myth and so laid the foundation for a century and a half of naturalism as the dominant worldview in our culture. If we understand this, we can understand why the biblical teaching of Creation is under such relentless attack today. What is at stake is the first principle of the Christian worldview; everything stands or falls with its teaching on ultimate origins.

This concept is absolutely critical, and so Pearcey devotes a third of the book to discussing evolution. It was not just a mere scientific theory which sought to explain the facts of the natural world; its significance rather was that it signalled a revolution in what counts as knowledge. Christians, then and now, who do not know how to construct their own worldview and critique competing ones with the grid of Creation, Fall, and Redemption, have missed this clash of worldviews, and have either retreated into Fundamentalism, or have attempted to reconcile their theism with evolution, a move which, because of what is at stake, is very dangerous.

When Christianity is articulated as a full fledged worldview, it is liberated from the two-story division that has reduced it to an upper-story private experience and is restored to the status of objective truth. We can then recognize the non-Christian assumptions and methods that have permeated our thinking. We will once again begin practicing theistic science (and economics, and law, etc.) because it will once again seem appropriate to consult all that we know when doing these activities. Intelligent Design is seeking to do just that in the realm of science, but is encountering resistance among Christians who don't yet recognize the conflict as one over competing worldviews. This resistance is even among Reformed Christians, where worldview thinking has a long and rich history. What this tells me is that the conflict runs deep, and that time, wisdom, and humility are needed before we can purge all worldly ways of thinking and take captive every thought and make it obedient to Christ.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read, March 7, 2008
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This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
I have often lamented the overuse of the term "life-changing" amongst Christians. It is not unusual to hear people walk away from a particularly captivating sermon or conference saying "that changed my life!" The real measure and test of life change is time, for only in time will we really know what has made a significant impact on our lives. Having established that I do not use the term lightly, I would like to suggest that Total Truth by Nancy Pearcey may just be a life-changing book. As believers we collectively spend millions of dollars and countless hours reading about Christian living - making our homes better, making our families better, making our lives better, discovering our purpose, rediscovering our masculine soul or our feminine soul and so on ad infinitum, ad nauseum. There are some who love to supplement with the study of theology or church history, and those are great pursuits. But if we buy so many books and read so much, why do we dedicate so little time to examining and studying worldview? I do not mean to indict the reader and clear my own name, for in all the reading I have done, this is the first book that deals predominantly with that topic.

Total Truth is subtitled "Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity" and this is the task to which Pearcey dedicates the book. She shows how Christians have adopted a worldview that is bound and influenced by our culture, so that we now understand Christianity through a secular worldview. She teaches that the opposite needs to be true - that we need to see society through a distinctly Christian lens, allowing a Christian worldview to interpret all that we see, do and think. She says "This book will address [the hunger for a Christian worldview] and offers new direction for advancing the worldview movement. It will help you identify the secular/sacred divide that keeps your faith locked into the private sphere of 'religious truth.' It will walk you through practical, workable steps for crafting a Christian worldview in your own life and work. It will teach you how to apply a worldview grid to cut through the bewildering maze of ideas and ideologies we encounter in a postmodern world." (Page 17) In short, the purpose of the book is to help Christians free their faith from its cultural captivity and to see that Christianity is not merely religious truth, but is Total Truth - truth about the whole of reality. "The purpose of a worldview is to explain our experience of the world-and any philosophy can be judged by how well it succeeds in doing so. When Christianity is tested, we discover that it alone explains and makes sense of the most basic and universal human experiences."

As a devotee of Francis Shaeffer, Pearcey borrows heavily from his writing and ideas. Most notably, she understands, as did Shaeffer, that Christians have mimicked the world in adopting a two-level worldview which she calls a fact/value split. It can be represented as follows:

VALUES
Individual Preferences
---------------------
FACTS
Binding on everyone

In the upper level are values which are mere individual preferences and on the bottom level are facts which are binding on everyone. Facts represent knowledge drawn from and proven by science and in this way they are considered objective and rational. On the other hand, on the top level are values which are considered subjective and a product of tradition. Thus are not binding beyond the individual's conscience and are essentially irrational. They have little to say about reality. This split has pervaded all aspects of society.

The thesis of this book is "the key to recovering joy and purpose turned out to be a new understanding of Christianity as total truth - an insight that broke open the dam and poured the restoring waters of the gospel into the parched areas of life." The first step in recovering a Christian worldview is to understand the bifurcated worldview which is inherent in our postmodern world. Having understood that we have made false disctinctions between secular and sacred, we can begin integrating our faith into every area of life so that we bear a consistent witness throughout. Politicians are beginning to come to the realization that politics is downstream from culture. In order to change the politics of our nations, we must first influence the culture, and to do that we must reclaim a Christian worldview. "Ordinary Christians working in business, industry, politics, factory work, and so on, are 'the Church's front-line troops' in the spiritual battle. Are we taking seriously our duty to support them in their warfare? The church is nothing less than a training ground for sending out laypeople who are equipped to speak the gospel to the world." That is the subject of the bulk of the book - training and sending laypeople who can share the Gospel with the world. Pearcey continually exposes those areas that have been polluted by a secular worldview and explains how Christians need to reclaim them.

After Pearcey thoroughly deconstructed our society's postmodern worldview in the first few chapters of the book, I found I did not have as clear an idea as to how I could rebuild a Christian worldview. But perhaps this is because there are no easy answers - there is no happy W.O.R.L.D.V.I.E.W. acronym that will allow me to follow a 9-step program to worldview reconstruction. The key is to acknowledge the deficiency of holding a two-level worldview and by immersing myself in Scripture, allowing God to shape and mould me as He sees fit. A Christian worldview must necessarily flow from the study and application of God's Word. I need to understand and believe that Christian Truth is a unified whole, equally encompassing all of life.

In reading books written by intellectuals, rather than pastors and teachers, I have often found that their theology is shaped more by the Catholic intellectuals of days past than by the Protestant theology. This is not the case for Pearcey. She strikes a good balance of praise and criticism in her presentation of Protestantism, generally defending the actions and motives of the Reformers and believers of history. Similarly she praises various Catholic scholars (such as Aquinas) for contributions they made, but is necessarily harsh when discussing their shortcomings. Throughout the book, the author maintains this important balance. It was wonderful to see that Pearcey presents significant, deep theology that clearly aligns with the Reformed understandings of the Scripture.

I am in agreement with Al Mohler who said "Total Truth is one of the most promising books to emerge in evangelical publishing in many years. It belongs in every Christian home, and should quickly be put into the hands of every Christian young person. This important book should be part of the equipment for college or university study, and churches should use it as a textbook for Christian worldview development." Pearcey has crafted a masterpiece that is intellectually stimulating but still accessible and practical. It will challenge, motivate and change. I give it my hearty recommendation.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Review of Total Truth, April 9, 2012
By 
Robert Pruitt "Robbie" (Port-au-Prince, Haiti) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A Review of Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity, By Nancy Pearcey

"They mean to tell us all was rolling blind, till accidentally it hit on the mind. . ." - Robert Frost

The theologian and minister A.W. Tozer is quoted as saying, "Nothing less than a whole Bible can make a whole Christian." While this is true Christian thinking, it would also have to be equally true that nothing less than a whole person can make a whole Christian. Both must be true. This would include our mind, our thinking, and our vocations. Nancy Pearcey addresses this point in her book Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity.

In Total Truth, Pearcey addresses the issue of the false dichotomy between the sacred and the secular. The divide between the sacred and the secular is a false dichotomy. This is dualism and a plague, according to Pearcey, which does not reflect a true Christian worldview. Pearcey seeks to recapture the idea, which our early church fathers had, that "all truth is God's truth" and that this truth is to be lived out in every area of our lives. She states that the "total truth" captures all of life and reality. We are to be integrated and whole human beings, living in the world, while living out our faith consistently in a manner that brings glory to our God. As the Apostle Paul puts it in Colossians 3:17, "whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him." This is a more accurate picture of a life lived by a whole, and integrated, Christian.

In Total Truth, Pearcey defines what a worldview is. She defines it simply as the understanding of the entire human experience. Pearcey explores Christian worldview, the understanding of the whole human experience, through the lens of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration. She states that "the Christian worldview alone offers a whole and intrical truth." It is through this perspective that we properly understand and live out our Christian faith in the world fulfilling the "cultural mandate." Pearcey describes the living out of a Christian worldview, and the fulfilling the cultural mandate, as a "higher calling," which entails being creative with our lives and work. It is in this higher calling, that we help restore our full humanity and begin to live out of a truly Christian worldview. As Christians, we are called to "creative effort extended for the glory of God and for the benefit of others." Pearcey states that we are to be "Participating in the work of God as agents of His grace."

Our job as Christians, according to Pearcey, is to apply the finished work of Christ on the cross to all of our lives. This integration of faith and life is what all Christians are called to and this is what scripture speaks about in the grand narrative of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration. This "total truth" of the Christian life does not allow for fragmented thinking, false dichotomies, or disintegrated truth. A better reflection of a Biblical and Christian worldview is one without division of public and private, sacred and secular, or fact and feeling. Our beliefs are to be integrated and our faith must be reflected and integrated in every area of our lives, especially in our thinking. As Charles Malik put it, "The problem is not only to win souls but to save minds. If you win the whole world and lose the mind of the world, you will soon discover you have not won the world." We cannot and must not divorce our faith and our thinking.

Any alternative to this holistic, "total truth," Christian worldview, or any alternative to Christianity, according to Pearcey, is religion and the worship of idols. Having a false worldview demonstrates a misunderstanding of the true character and nature of God, and in effect, this leads to worshiping a false god, or idol worship. If we are to participate in the liberation of Christianity from its cultural captivity, we must not yield to the cultures "gods," or look at the one true God falsely. When we yield to the idea that God's universe, and all the truth therein, is not His own, we neglect God and are no longer worshiping the one true God, or living from a Biblical and Christian worldview.

Nancy Pearcey's book Total Truth addresses all of God's truth, or "total truth," and addresses living from a Christian worldview in four sections. In section one, What's in a Worldview?, she talks about a Christian worldview through the following chapters: Breaking Out of the Grid, Rediscovering Joy, Keeping Religion in Its Place, and Surviving the Spiritual Wasteland. In section two, Starting at the Beginning, Pearcey addresses philosophies or origins and differing worldviews in these chapters: Darwin Meets the Berenstain Bears, The Science of Common Sense, Today Biology, Tomorrow the World, and Darwins of the Mind. In section three of her book, How We Lost Our Minds, Pearcey explores the predicament that we find ourselves in, in modern Christendom, in these chapters: What's So Good About Evangelicalism?, When America Met Christianity -- Guess Who Won?, Evangelicals' Two-Story Truth, and How Women Started the Culture War. In the final and fourth section of her book, What Next, Living It Out, Pearcey applies these sections in her final chapter, True Spirituality and Christian Worldview.

At the end of Total Truth, Pearcey includes several helpful and insightful appendices, appendix one, How American Politics Became Secularized, appendix two: Modern Islam and the New Age Movement, appendix three, The Long War Between Materialism and Christianity, and appendix four, Isms on the Run: Practical Apologetics at L'Abri. Then, she includes an exhaustive section of notes. Next, she includes a thorough recommended reading list. Finally, Nancy Pearcey ends her book with a helpful Study Guide.

Total Truth, by Nancy Pearcey, is a fantastic book on truth and living from a Christian and Biblical worldview. This is simply a must read for anyone in education or ministry, or anyone who is looking to think and live rightly, Biblically, holistically, and from a Biblical and Christian worldview. This is a very important work as the culture has shifted, and continues to shift, to a postmodern and to a post Christian thinking and worldview. We must think rightly about all of God's truth and all of God's creation. Nothing less than the "total truth" will do as we seek to participate in the cultural mandate to help liberate Christianity from its cultural captivity as we think rightly and live Biblically from a solid Christian worldview.

This review was first published on my blog, My Two Mites, and Examiner.com, and will be posted in goodreads.

Bibliography

Pearcey, Nancy. Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from its Cultural Captivity (Study Guide Edition), Crossway Books, Wheaton Ill., © 2004, 2005.

The New King James Version. Nashville : Thomas Nelson, 1982, S. Col 3:17
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Some Gems in a Lot of Rough, January 4, 2013
By 
This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
I debated whether or not this should be a two or three star review before eventually deciding that Pearcy's good points were tertiary to her intent. Thus, I felt like what could have been fair was less than.

However, it's difficult to rate this book in the first place considering that it felt like three or four books ranging from decent to atrocious. Still, it is somewhat easy to differentiate between those books thanks to Pearcy's handy separation of the tome into four parts.

Part One is her attempt to provide a definition of a worldview and the effect one's worldview has on one's life as well as the need for one's worldview to be Christian. Already the seeds for problems were planted when it became clear that her understanding of what a worldview is had been strongly shaped by the worldview she had; she failed to be able to step out of her perspective to gain a larger picture. There is a feedback loop - one's worldview shapes one's interpretation of facts, including Scriture, which in turn shapes one's worldview - that she doesn't seem aware of. In the midst of this, however, her consideration of the sacred/secular split was actually quite astute and helpful.

In Part Two, Pearcy's real problems begin manifesting. She seems to make the assumption that everyone has a single, coherent worldview, which is potentially an impossible feat. We all bear fractured and conflicting perspectives, but she argues from the understanding that one's worldview is always unified and non-conflicting, just usually wrong. She also repeatedly provides the logical results of illogical thinking, which is in of itself illogical since illogical thinking does not, by definition, have to lead to a logical end. The assumption that human beings are driven primarily by analytical processes is prevalent throughout as well as the belief that the catalyst for one's worldview to change is primarily through intellectual confrontation, both of which are questionable if not completely faulty.

Also in Part Two, Pearcy makes two glaring errors. The first is where she comes exceedingly close to stating that a Christian does not believe until he/she has formulated a complete Christian worldview, which is absurd and makes Christianity about rational analysis rather than about faith or the heart. The second is where she attributes various moral failings in American culture to an evolutionary worldview despite the fact that such failures were prominent in many cultures throughout history far before evolution was ever conceived. In addition, she attacks some cultural phenomena without understanding them. On the positive end, she does posit some good questions and observations about evolution science, though Francis Collins (whom she upheld as an evangelical scientist) countered many, though not all of them, in his book published two years after. Still, I wish she had examined the strengths and flaws of each perspective rather than considering only one side, a move that seemed to lack humility.

Finally in Part Three, Pearcy feels like she begins writing in her strengths. She analyzes the birth and progress of Evangelicalism, beginning with the Great Awakenings, where she draws parallels to the style of those movements to the contemporary evangelical culture. She posits where the origins of evangelical emotionalism and celebrity come from and traces the philosophical ideals in its theology, though her solution to Evangelicalism's current problems being to allow theology to determine its character is naive. Regardless, these were actually quite worthwhile chapters.

Part Four is but a single chapter, and while I agree with a good portion of it, it also fails to sound out much beyond, "Do the right thing." In the end, Pearcy's recommendation is right thinking and the application of willpower, which undercuts the cross and fails to understand the intricacies of human nature.

There are two, final issues that I was unhappy with throughout. The first is Pearcy's over-reliance on reason and the intellect. She fails to understand the person as a whole, perceiving only the mind as meaningful and worthwhile. The second is her aggressive response to problems. Her answer is always to fight back against untruth and evil, but this flies in the face of Jesus' life and sacrifice. For her, truth seems to trump love rather than finding a means of integrating them. I fear she is like the Greeks who sought wisdom and thereby missed Jesus. (1 Cor. 1:22-23)
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24 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, November 29, 2009
As an avid seeker of the Truth, I thought that this book would be an interesting read, especially considering it's subtitle. I was disappointed however. While I am not opposed to reading lengthy books, I think that Pearcey's style was rambling and the basic information contained in this book could have been condensed into a book half its length. The historical information that Pearcey shares about how Christianity has ended up being relegated to the private realm of "whatever is true for you" is informative. However, I constantly found myself anxious to get to the practical application of her arguments. Imagine my disappointment, when after almost 400 pages of reading (not light reading either), her action plan basically consisted of Christians needing to act in a loving manner toward one another and apply what the Bible teaches to their everyday lives. This seemed to be such a "duh" conclusion, I sit here now typing this amazed that I invested so much time in reading this book. I should have practiced better "book previewing" skills and read the last chapter first instead of laboring through the entire book waiting to hear some practical steps for how to "liberate Christianity from it's cultural captivity." If you want to know how to liberate Christianity from it's cultural captivity, don't waste your time with this book. You will not walk away with any practical application. And if you are already a convinced creationist, just know ahead of time that the extent of Pearcey's recommendation is to support the arguments for Intelligent Design against those of evolution ("duh" again). The best advice I can give to everyone, Christian or not, is to seek the Truth and don't be afraid to question the basis for your own beliefs. Question your teachers, question the authors you read, question the beliefs and practices of yourself and those around you. Who wants to believe in a lie? Don't be lazy -- find the Truth. Don't hide behind what you've been taught, or what you think. Know why you believe what you believe and be able to defend it.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CLEAR, PROFOUND....TRULY A MUST READ, January 13, 2007
By 
Brad Cooper (northern Indiana) - See all my reviews
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I've read hundreds of books but have found little time to review them. This book deserves for me to make time. THIS IS UNDOUBTEDLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS I HAVE EVER READ.

This book has been of immense help to me in understanding and crystallizing numerous issues that I have been grappling with and struggling to convey to others. (I've been teaching on these issues for over 25 years--10 years as a pastor--and I'm currently in charge of teaching apologetics at the non-denominational evangelical church where I attend with my family.)

This appears to be a synthesis of Pearcey's own learning and writing over the last 30+ years of searching, learning and grappling with Biblical truth under the guidance of such excellent mentors and fellow travelers as Francis Schaeffer, Chuck Colson, etc. that the Holy Spirit has used in her life.

In this book, Pearcey skillfully unveils the blind spots in the evangelical intellect (and the intellect of Western culture in general).

It's not without reason that the edition of this book that I have contains 5 pages of enthusiastic reviews by more than 50 of the Church's most respected leaders.

Al Mohler (President of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) comments: "May well be one of the most important Christian books of our times." No disrespect intended, but I think Al may be hedging here. Personally, I have no problem saying that this IS one of the most important Christian books of our times.

James Sire (author of The Universe Next Door) says: "Best work of cultural analysis from a Christian standpoint available today."

Gene Edward Veith (Culture Editor, World magazine) writes: "Breaks new ground in worldview analysis....the most insightful applications since Francis Schaeffer."

I could go on and quote the other 50 (Ha!).....Let me just say, in summary, that Pearcey has done a great service to the evangelical church and to the world. She has reviewed the difficult and complex history of western philosophy and summarized it succinctly and clearly--drawing out numerous profound and relevant insights that burst forth page after page.

WHETHER YOU'RE A CHRISTIAN OR NOT, IF YOU HAVE TIME TO READ ONLY ONE BOOK THIS YEAR, I URGE YOU TO MAKE IT THIS ONE.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing a Biblical worldview into our everyday lives, January 25, 2011
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This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
In my seminary class, Shaping the Mind of a Leader, this book was assigned for us to read. After reading it, I realized that this book isn't just a book that should be read in classrooms, this book should be shared in our churches!

Nancy Pearcey's book Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity addresses the need for evangelical Christians to apply their biblical worldview into all aspects of their lives. Not just for Sunday mornings or Bible studies, but even at work and in the home.

Pearcey brings up several examples in order to reiterate her point, that really help illustrate the necessity for Total Truth (a biblical worldview in every aspect of our lives) in our world.

She also combats Darwinism and the theory of natural selection. After that section she "throws a few jabs" at the evangelical church which some may find offensive.

But if you are a theology student, or an evangelical Christian, this book is a must read! The insights that she brings forth and the way that they are presented are well worth the time to invest in reading this excellent work.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Apologetics Book to Read, November 9, 2009
This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
If I had to pick one book that clearly and unabashedly depicted the current secular worldview and the Christian need for preparedness to combat it,this is the book I would choose without hesitation. Pearcey, a devotee of the teachings and writings of Francis Schaeffer, sounds the alarm of what is happening to our culture as biblical truths concerning morals and ethics are marginalized or attacked outright. She and others like Charles Colson and Ravi Zacharias have become the C. S. Lewis of apologetics in today's cultural conflict.

If one is truly and earnestly seeking to, "Sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear", then Total Truth is the work that will aid in the dissemination of a Christian worldview.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From the Inside Flap:, March 19, 2006
Does God belong in the public arena of politics, business, law, and education? Or is religion a private matter only-personally comforting but publicly irrelevant?

In today's cultural etiquette, it is not considered polite to mix public and private, or sacred and secular. This division is the single most potent force keeping Christianity contained in the private sphere-stripping it of its power to challenge and redeem the whole of culture.

In "Total Truth", Nancy Pearcey offers a razor-sharp analysis of the public/private split, explaining how it hamstrings our efforts at both personal and cultural renewal. Ultimately it reflects a division in the concept of truth itself, which functions as a gatekeeper, ruling Christian principles out of bounds in the public arena.

How can we unify our fragmented lives and recover spiritual power? With examples from the lives of real people, past and present, Pearcey teaches readers how to liberate Christianity from its cultural captivity. She walks readers through practical, hands-on steps for crafting a full-orbed Christian worldview.

Finally, she makes a passionate case that Christianity is not just religious truth but truth about total reality. It is total truth.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, March 21, 2013
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This review is from: Total Truth (Study Guide Edition): Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity (Paperback)
After reading this book, my wife purchased four more copies to give to friends, and will probably give more out. It challenges the worldviews many Christians have and don't realize it. We have so many worldly mindsets, and don't frame our thoughts and ideas Biblically.
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