Totalitarianism: The Inner History of the Cold War and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Totalitarianism: The Inner History of the Cold War Hardcover – June 8, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0195050172 ISBN-10: 0195050177 Edition: 1St Edition

9 New from $56.50 25 Used from $1.19 1 Collectible from $99.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$56.50 $1.19
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1St Edition edition (June 8, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195050177
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195050172
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,277,280 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Gleason's study of totalitarianism is an outstanding treatment of the complex and contentious subject. What gives it special value is that it contains a thoughtful and succinct analysis of the theories of totalitarianism and at the same time deals equally successfully with the practical politics of totalitarian systems and states.

From Booklist

Gleason surveys the intellectual course, in the U.S. and Europe, of the totalitarian model of one-party dictatorships. It is a political concept that became so influential in the councils of power that numerous scholarly careers and institutes were created in the late '40s to study the Soviet Union. Essentially, Gleason critiques the relevant books and ideas produced, and, incidentally, the two powerful and popular novels, Darkness at Noon and Nineteen Eighty-Four, that crystallized the idea of totalitarianism and underpinned the West's justification for resisting Communist expansion. Naturally, refutations of the model were offered over the decades, mostly from the Left resisting conservative claims that Communists were unredeemedly illiberal, an intellectual battle that peaked with Jeane Kirkpatrick facing off critics of Reagan's foreign policy. The text is smooth flowing for readers first plunging into this matter, and libraries that haven't purged their collections of the model's essential formulation, Arendt's Origins of Totalitarianism, can renew interest with this scholarly piece of intellectual history. Gilbert Taylor

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Caesar M. Warrington on June 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
Be aware, this book is less about the history of the Cold War or those socio-political systems considered "totalitarian" as it is about the origin and context of the word itself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Henrique Varajidás on April 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
If you seek an introduction to the twentieth-century debate on totalitarianism, this is a must have. As long as you understand that the author's goal is to present a historiography of the concept itself - and not to articulate some new theory -, you should be able to enjoy its rich content and its vast scope (the chapter on Eastern Europe intellectuals is especially rewarding). You get clear summaries of what a huge amount of authors wrote on the subject and you are provided with very nicely framed historical contexts for the arguments and controversies presented.

It delivers what it promises, 100%.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Larry VanDeSande VINE VOICE on October 16, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I felt like a college student again reading Abbott Gleason's "Totalitarianism: The Inner History of the Cold War" because the book was like so many immovable histories I read in college -- books that traverse their subjects so inellectually the history was static and the people, events and upheavals that made the history were considered afterthoughts. This one defeats itself by spending a chapter taking potshots at the most telling tome about totalitarianism, Hannah Arendt's classic The Origins of Totalitarianism: Introduction by Samantha Power

If this sounds like I didn't like the book, that's a possibility. I don't know if I liked it or not. It wasn't an easy read and for pages at a time it wasn't very interesting with references couched in laborious footnotes of published materiial. It lacked the scope, passion and purpose of Arendt's tome and it didn't explain much about what totalitarianism did to the nations in question during the Cold War. It occasinally talked about the people that influenced totalitarianism and some of its foils but spent far more time referencing what people wrote about this.

Gleason begins by defining Mussolini's Italy in the 1920s as the template for 20th century totalitarianism and spends a lot of time defining the term and citing sources that use it to define total government. He moves onto other forms of fascism then to the inevitable communist countries and the American response to them, oftem seeming to say Americans hated communists in the 20th century while they regularly sided with other totalitarian states.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images