Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Totto-Chan: The Little Girl at the Window Paperback – May 15, 1996


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.25 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

There is a newer edition of this item:


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Kodansha USA; 1997 edition (May 15, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 4770020678
  • ISBN-13: 978-4770020673
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #784,681 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"[Totto-chan] is a quiet indictment of sterile education."
New York Times

"Sensitively written, delicately illustrated, poetically translated, Totto-chan is, like a haiku, filled with aesthetic and philosophical depth."
Library Journal

"[Totto-chan] has reminded millions of Japanese what children think education should be."
International Herald Tribune

"Totto-chan can be expected to attract American educators, parents, and perhaps some children who appreciate the international view beyond their own first-floor window."
Christian Science Monitor

Language Notes

Text: English, Japanese (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
48
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 51 customer reviews
This is one of my all-time favorite books.
Totto-chan's child
This book consists of Tetsuko Kuroyanagi's childhood of a very unusual school with a very woderful headmaster.
jyosefin
I'm not recommending this book just because I'm Japanese, but because I think it's a really easy book to read.
yuriko miyake

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
A heart-warming, and delightful collection of true stories of young Tetsuko Kuroyanagi, a famous television personality in Japan. It begins when Totto-chan ( Tetsuko's nick name) was expelled from the first grade because of her disruptive behaviour. She was then transferred to a very unique school ran by a headmaster who had his own teaching philosophy. The school itself was not in a building but in discarded railroad cars. The book also includes other adventures Totto-chan had been involved in, and also previews what life had been like as a small child in Japan during the outbreak of World War II. I recomend this book to parents, and teachers because of Mr. Kobayashi- the headmaster's philosophy of education. It also makes fun reading for children, as I myself have had this book since I was twelve years old.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Kasey M. Moctezuma on June 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
I received this book as a gift from a pen pal in Japan about fifteen years ago, and recently found it on Amazon - so I had to buy copies of it for all of my friends. This is a very sweet, simple book and it is also a true story of the author, who is a famous television personality in Japan. The story is written very simply, and it would not be inappropriate for a child, yet not too simplified for an adult. The story begins when Totto-chan, the heroine of the story, is on her way to a new school after being expelled from her old school (she does not find out about the expulsion until years later). The new school is a progressive school which does things in a different way, and treats children differently, teaching them to see the world in a new way. The book is filled with side splitting funny stories, and a few touching ones as well. When you finish reading it, (it won't take long) it will bring a tear to your eye, but make you smile, and make you feel better for having read it. Check it out - I promise you won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "beariehugz" on February 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
Totto Chan is my favourite book! I mean it! My first encounter with Totto Chan was in a book of short stories during a literature lesson. I was deeply amazed by the fact that how a first-grader could be expelled from school. Reading about Totto Chan's experiences really tugged at my heartstrings. Even her new school Tomoe Gakuen exuded a charm of its own. I simply love the atmosphere of the school and the song that the students dutifully sing before meals. While reading the book, I could almost imagine myself attending classes in abandoned railroad cars and the euphoria of going to school everyday. Definitely not a chore, not anymore. I would recommend this book to everyone who wants to relive their childhood memories. This book is worth every penny! What are you waiting for? Go get it now!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on June 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
It is an ausome book which features the life of a young, innocent Japanese girl during World War 2. She was expelled from her first school when she was in Grade 1, for disrupting the class by making lots of noise in many ways. The girl left for another school (Tomoe) thinking that her very understanding mother had chosen to leave the school on her on will. Her new school was very unique as its classrooms were actually discarded railroad cars. The headmaster himself was very different from other headmasters. He had looked at education from a different angle altogether. He understood children very well and was a father-figure to Totto-Chan and all the children of the school. The book is divided into many chapters and nearly every chapter teaches a lesson. The book can be read by anybody as it has a mixture of elation,sorrow and adventure.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
Totto-chan is a wonderfully-woven book written through the innocent point of view of a little child. Her looking at the window, whether to the musicians or to a better school, symbolised her imaginative nature and hope for what she wants. Tomoe Gakuen is a unique school and the headmaster is a perfect example of a person who promotes freedom of speech. Although this book is rather simple, I like the way the story slowly unfolds, just like the slow revealing of a curtain to see what's outside the window. It teaches us the importance to be child-like.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By yuriko miyake on May 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'm 14 and in 8th grade. I recommend "Totto-chan The Girl at the Window" to any age, any kind of people if they can read English or Japanese. I'm not recommending this book just because I'm Japanese, but because I think it's a really easy book to read. Maybe, some people won't like it that much because it's not a book that makes you excited, romantic, or horrifyed. But I think no one will hate it. It take place in Jiyugaoka, Tokyo during World War 2. The sory is fiction, however, it's about the auther's real life when she was in first to second grade. I think the innocent girl Totto-chan tought me many kinds of things, especially about friendship and innocence. I think for every chapter there's a moral, but I think most were things I had learned in the past, however forgot them. It reminded me of all the feelings I experienced when I was little and can't experience any more. I think this book is full of these kinds of things I mentioned. It makes us flash back to the little discoveries, little adventures which non-innocent people can't experience anymore. It reminds us of something that doesn't really effect our usual lives, however, it's a really important thing which we just forgot. You might think that it's a boring book, but that's not true. Just try it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?