Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available
 

Touched By Fire: Doctors Without Borders in a Third World Crisis [Kindle Edition]

Elliott Leyton , Greg Locke
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $9.99
Sold by: Random House LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $9.99  
Hardcover --  
The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks by Sam Maggs
The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs
It’s never been a better time to be a girl geek. Learn more | See related books

Book Description

When the rapes and massacres, the plagues, the famines, the floods, or the droughts erupt in far-off places, the world stands still. MSF does not.

They are the “smoke jumpers” among international aid organizations. While others are often stymied or delayed by bureaucratic red tape, the men and women of Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières or MSF) move in. They provide food and clean water. They dig latrines. They set up first-aid stations and field hospitals. They treat all-comers according to need. Often they are the last to remain in situations abandoned by others as too dangerous.

The risks they take are moral and ethical as well as mortal. They are acutely aware that giving aid is controversial. Does it really do any good to save a child from murder one day when it will probably starve in the weeks ahead? Is it appropriate to bring expensive western medicine into a country that, in the long run, can’t afford it? Should relief be given to civilians who are being starved on purpose, as part of a cynical political game, by a local warlord?

Elliot Leyton and Greg Locke saw something of the implications of these and other questions when they travelled to Rwanda in the fall of 1996. There they found themselves plunged into a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions. Hundreds of thousands of people were on the move. Armed militias and hostile armies lurked in the background. Mass starvation, plague, and an eruption into civil or criminal violence were immediate possibilities. The two Canadians, one an internationally recognized expert on the psychology of killing, the other an experienced photo-journalist, had a rare opportunity to observe MSF in action at a time when the stress was enormous and its resources were stretched to the limit.

They watched and listened, to the perpetrators of violence and their victims, to the survivors and those who gave them assistance, and, above all, to the people of MSF who dedicate themselves to saving lives because, in the words of one MSFer: “The world can afford a humanitarian ideal.”

The result of Leyton and Locke’s research is an extraordinary written and visual record of small miracles performed in the midst of catastrophe.


From the Hardcover edition.


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Leyton aims to make outsiders understand what is going on in Rwanda and many other countries and what makes workers for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF)--which, as an independent organization, gets physicians more quickly into places where they are needed than, say, the UN--throw themselves selflessly into such horrible situations. Few will be able to read his devastating book without crying or becoming infuriated. Leyton, an anthropologist, focuses especially on MSF work in Rwanda during the genocides of 1994 and 1996, giving not a glossy media report but a down and dirty account, featuring individualized men, women, children, civilians, soldiers, and politicians as well as statistics. Genocide, he argues, is civilization's main tool for neatening populations and boundaries, and far from being a primitive invention or an African aberration, it is a European practice, begun by the 1895 and 1915 Turkish genocides of the Armenians. Black-and-white and color photos add much to Leyton's forceful, eye-opening text. William Beatty

From the Inside Flap

When the rapes and massacres, the plagues, the famines, the floods, or the droughts erupt in far-off places, the world stands still. MSF does not.

They are the ?smoke jumpers? among international aid organizations. While others are often stymied or delayed by bureaucratic red tape, the men and women of Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières or MSF) move in. They provide food and clean water. They dig latrines. They set up first-aid stations and field hospitals. They treat all-comers according to need. Often they are the last to remain in situations abandoned by others as too dangerous.

The risks they take are moral and ethical as well as mortal. They are acutely aware that giving aid is controversial. Does it really do any good to save a child from murder one day when it will probably starve in the weeks ahead? Is it appropriate to bring expensive western medicine into a country that, in the long run, can?t afford it? Should relief be given to civilians who are being starved on purpose, as part of a cynical political game, by a local warlord?

Elliot Leyton and Greg Locke saw something of the implications of these and other questions when they travelled to Rwanda in the fall of 1996. There they found themselves plunged into a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions. Hundreds of thousands of people were on the move. Armed militias and hostile armies lurked in the background. Mass starvation, plague, and an eruption into civil or criminal violence were immediate possibilities. The two Canadians, one an internationally recognized expert on the psychology of killing, the other an experienced photo-journalist, had a rare opportunity to observe MSF in action at a time when the stress was enormous and its resources were stretched to the limit.

They watched and listened, to the perpetrators of violence and their victims, to the survivors and those who gave them assistance, and, above all, to the people of MSF who dedicate themselves to saving lives because, in the words of one MSFer: ?The world can afford a humanitarian ideal.?

The result of Leyton and Locke?s research is an extraordinary written and visual record of small miracles performed in the midst of catastrophe.

Product Details

  • File Size: 12542 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart (January 27, 2014)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00I1ZKAEC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,008,024 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
(4)
5.0 out of 5 stars
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The clearest explanation of "why" aid workers do it. December 29, 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Of all the texts I have read concerning Africa and its political/economic problems, this is the best contribution to understanding the motivations of those involved in providing humanitarian assistance. It represents ultimately a message of hope which counters the many pessimistic texts covering this area. The hope is neither misplaced or naive, but is a product of a level of understanding on the part of the authors rarely grasped I think by similar authors. Highly recommended.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Level Appraisal December 28, 2001
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
The criticisms I can aim at this book are few: there's some needless reiteration of points made early on and some loss of context in the wash of events described. Both are stylistic and really just matters of taste.
Knowing only what an outsider can glean about MSF, this seems a wholly objective, balanced assessment of the group(s), its membership(s) and the circumstances, compromises, and pervasive questions attendant to both. The very real limitations and dangers of international aid are presented frankly, as is the selfless dedication of the MSF staff. Individuals are not squeezed into comfortable categories; the complexities, even the occasional flashes of swagger or ugliness, of each participant are served up with relative detachment.
As an introduction to the politics and human costs of genocide (admittedly from a singular, but coherent political perspective), it's hard to beat.
The photographs, which portray a parallel narrative, are likewise honest, and both stories are rendered with sufficient feeling expose what is truly uplifting about MSF.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Level Appraisal December 28, 2001
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
The criticisms I can aim at this book are few: there's some needless reiteration of points made early on and some loss of context in the wash of events described. Both are stylistic and really just matters of taste.
Knowing only what an outsider can glean about MSF, this seems a wholly objective, balanced assessment of the group(s), its membership(s) and the circumstances, compromises, and pervasive questions attendant to both. The very real limitations and dangers of international aid are presented frankly, as is the selfless dedication of the MSF staff. Individuals are not squeezed into comfortable categories; the complexities, even the occasional flashes of swagger or ugliness, of each participant are served up with relative detachment.
As an introduction to the politics and human costs of genocide (admittedly from a singular, but coherent political perspective), it's hard to beat.
The photographs, which portray a parallel narrative, are likewise honest, and both stories are rendered with sufficient feeling expose what is truly uplifting about MSF.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down! August 19, 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of MSF work and I loved this book ... I read it in one night, I couldn't put it down! The photos compliment the stories nicely. If anyone is interested in learning more about the people MSF care for and the about what makes a person leave behind their family and friends to do this work, this is the book to read! Enjoy!Touched By Fire: Doctors Without Borders in a Third World Crisis
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Search Customer Reviews

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category