Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $6.65 (35%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Gently Used Book, Clean Pages, Tight Binding, Minor Wear, Ships Now.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Touchpoints 3 to 6 Paperback – October 15, 2002


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.30
$4.79 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

Touchpoints 3 to 6 + Touchpoints-Birth to Three + Discipline: The Brazelton Way
Price for all three: $33.77

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development
  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press (October 15, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738206784
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738206783
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.8 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Like a soothing tonic, Touchpoints Three to Six offers a simple theory and plenty of sound advice to parents who struggle with their child's ever-changing moods and behaviors. Noted pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., bestselling author of Infants and Mothers and Touchpoints, builds on his theory that kids essentially "rev up" prior to reaching developmental milestones (like walking, talking, and potty training). Unfortunately for the whole family, such revving typically involves temper tantrums, night waking, and regression. Teaming with child psychiatrist Joshua D. Sparrow, M.D., Dr. Brazelton offers compassionate suggestions for recognizing key touchpoints in children 3 to 6 years old, helping kids work through them, and keeping one's cool throughout the process.

The first four chapters--one per age--provide fairly exhaustive study material on five topics: temperament, learning, moral development, building relationships, and separation and independence. To make the reading more engaging, Brazelton and Sparrow whip up four imaginary children, each with a distinct temperament, learning ability, and level of adaptability. Their shared experiences--from exploring the playground at age 3 to "entering the real world" during their 6th year--provide a helpful backdrop for discussing a myriad of pertinent issues. Smart dialogue, accurate depiction of parents' emotional responses, and surprise discoveries both amusing and serious all add to the breadth of information covered. The second half of the book offers about 200 pages of alphabetically arranged "perennials" and "current issues," for troubleshooting specifics like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, computers, divorce, habits, sadness, and toilet learning. An excellent resource for those who support empathetic parenting. --Liane Thomas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Venerable pediatrician Brazelton (Touchpoints) teams up with child psychologist Joshua D. Sparrow to adapt his theory of "touchpoints" to children ages three to six. In his earlier work, Brazelton explained that infants undergo periods of behavioral regression (touchpoints) before each developmental burst. Here he addresses issues like sibling rivalry, bedwetting, tantrums and lying as normal aspects of development, and suggests ways parents can be emotionally supportive. The first of the book's two major sections follows four imaginary children with varying, composite temperaments (an active boy, a quiet boy, an intense girl and a cheerful girl), exploring everything from adjusting to a new sibling to making friends. Readers may soon find themselves skipping all but the portions directly related to their own child's temperament type (and weeding out the fictional scenes to get to the nitty-gritty of what to do when a child lies, wets the bed, etc.). In the second section, the authors straightforwardly discuss various contemporary parenting concerns, such as the pros and cons of computers and dealing with divorce. Throughout, Brazelton and Sparrow maintain a characteristically comforting tone, reminding parents that it's best to accept a child's temperament while helping her adapt to the world. The authors not only point toward the predictable touchpoints for this age group but note that parents, too, may react to transition in certain ways, such as worrying that one is abandoning their first child when a new baby arrives. As always, Brazelton's poised, encouraging voice guides parents through the developmental maze. Photos.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
2
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 19 customer reviews
I do child care work with children of all ages and this book is a wealth of information.
Candis L. Nonnemacher
I have found that with the help of this book, the new understanding I have of my four-year-old has led me to new ways of responding to her difficult behaviors.
Victoria Beecher
I purchased this book to give as a gift and the recipients are happy to have in for their first child.
Ann B. Garrou

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Gail A. Brewster on February 27, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have admired Dr. Brazelton for years. I was delighted to find that he had come out with a book on three to six-year-olds. As the author of a behavior management program (The Voucher System), I have been searching for the right book to help parents of four-year-olds understand this often challenging age. I wish I had read the book before singing its praises to hundreds. Compared to "Touchpoints: Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development," Dr. Brazelton's new book lacks a reflection of his vast knowledge and wonderful talent. However, a person can glean much from this book. Even though "answers" are often hidden behind waves of arbitrary reading the book does touch on many important issues.
What many young parents are looking for is a simply laid out book addressing the habits, emotional development, and characteristics which are conducive to a child's respective age. This is not that kind of book. Have we forgotten that parents need the same answers we did twenty years ago? I remember the colorful, easy to read, thin book that helped me through the first six years. It explained that it's normal for a five-year-old to go through a lying phase, and how a four-year-old needs fantasy play, story books, coloring books and interaction with adults who will teach them the many things their minds are dying to soak in.
If you like to read, and you have the time, I suggest ordering this book and reading it cover to cover. It may not be the best book on specific answers to specific questions, but it's worth a read.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
62 of 66 people found the following review helpful By L. Scribner on September 28, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I am very sad to say that I was very disappointed since I am not sure I could have made it through the first three years without the first Touchpoints. Unfortunately, the clean organization and consistent formatting in each chapter that made Touchpoints such a valuable reference was lost in favor of more detailed stories about four children. It is very difficult to find your child in the four examples since they are so detailed it reads more like a novel than a parenting book. Also, I am aware of the amazing experience of the authors, but I don't know any children like those described. The three-year-olds are much more verbal and social, with less motor development than the ones I have known. That alone makes me feel like I am reading a sociological ethnography rather than the practical primer I was hoping to find. If you are looking for practical advice on why your four-year-old has started night waking, or why your formerly mellow three-year-old now has daily temper tantrums, you will only find it here if you are willing to dig through the entire volume and read between the lines.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 25, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dr. Brazelton seems to be a gentle and loving advocate for children, and a doctor who understands them! I've read other books by him and enjoyed them very much, and been comforted by them, and was looking forward to this addition to his work. Unfortunately I agree with most of the other comments made here, that the format makes it much more difficult to find specific information. Because the authors use four composite children to describe many events and behaviors, it makes it difficult to tease out what is relevant. Our toddler is very similar in temperament to "Billy", but Billy supposedly grew up with an abusive father for a while and his mother has remarried -- nothing like our child's experience -- so what becomes irrelevant in the text and what can we still use? Largely told as lengthy narratives, it takes a long time to find useful ideas, but there is a good index that helps.
Despite the poor format, the ideas here are solid and helpful. Brazelton and Sparrow posit that as children reach milestones of development they backslide in other areas -- a usually peaceful child suddenly indulging in temper tantrums as they begin to conquer speech, for example.
We've found Brazelton's ideas helpful and spot-on, and there are unique events in this age range that make the book useful, though the clunky format keeps it from being invaluable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Victoria Beecher on December 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
I highly recommend this book to every parent of children ages 3 to 6, and their teachers too. It is so much more respectful -of parents and children- then all those books that just tell parents what to do and talk about children as if they were simply meant to be programmed or controlled. I have found that with the help of this book, the new understanding I have of my four-year-old has led me to new ways of responding to her difficult behaviors. As a result, she is thriving, maturing before our eyes, and we're all happier for it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By erica2 on March 19, 2011
Format: Paperback
I just had to put down this book for a minute and write this review because I really feel this book is quite wonderful and valuable. Instead of all the "do this" "do that" of the typical parenting books "Ten days to this...." "Seven Ways to...." whatever, Brazelton uses NARRATIVES to follow a number of children from age three to age six, in the process describing the developmental touchpoints along with all the struggles and successes they experience. Along the way, he shares his insights about each developmental stage but it's really learning through the stories of the children. It's like having this incredibly skilled, wise, and experienced professional take you on a tour in which you examine the lives of a handful of children as they start to grow up. The things the children experience, of course, are similar to the things all children experience, so you come away from the book with a deeper understanding of how to be the best most understanding parent you can be--not a checklist of things to change about yourself or gimmicky techniques. In other words, this is SOLID. Brazelton leaves it to each parent to draw their own conclusions rather than pummel the parent on the head with some agenda, technique, method, school of thinking, etc. To make the book more overtly practical, he does include in the final section a series of short chapters about specific issues or subjects parents might be especially needing some guidance about like sleep, honesty, special needs kids, twins, grief and loss, etc. I would recommend this book to any parent who wants to take the time to really think about your kid and what he or she needs rather than just try to quickly apply some expert's method or technique.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?