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A Town Called Suckhole Paperback – September 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Eraserhead Press (September 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193638387X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936383870
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #997,716 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

EPIC PRAISE FOR A TOWN CALLED SUCKHOLE!
 
"The town itself is a character, beautifully realized through unconventional means.  Barbee's Suckhole is like one big birth defect, yet somehow he makes it all appealing... smothered and covered like an order of Aussie fries, and the gooier it gets, the more delicious it is to digest.  Highly recommended." -AIN'T IT COOL NEWS
 
"A Town Called Suckhole is the finest post-apocalyptic southern gothic mudpunk buddy-cop blow-out ever put to print. Which is to say this mutant motherfucker of a debut novel lands with serious world-inventing swagger and marks David W Barbee as a go-to Bizarro writer for outrageously over-the-top action, big laughs and surprising heart."  -JEREMY ROBERT JOHNSON, author of We Live Inside You and Angel Dust Apocalypse
 
"With the manic intensity of a tent revival on fire and the stupefying mendacity of a snake oil peddler on peyote, Barbee builds a rich, grimy world so steeped in rampaging Confederate id that for long stretches, I could not see it clearly through my red, blinding rage at not having written it, myself." -CODY GOODFELLOW, author of Perfect Union
 
"Joe R. Lansdale has some company when it comes to crazy southern gothic weirdness-a man by the name of David W. Barbee.  Basically, every little thing that was, is, and will be wrong with redneck culture is absolutely right in A Town Called Suckhole." -THE AUSTIN POST

More About the Author

David W Barbee is an author of bizarro fiction, the weirdest fiction on the planet. His work is full of dark monsters and strange maniacs, influenced by a deranged childhood diet of cartoons, comic books, and cult movies. He is the author of A TOWN CALLED SUCKHOLE and THUNDERPUSSY, while his short fiction has appeared in Verbicide Magazine, Surreal Grotesque, Full Metal Orgasm, Amazing Stories of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, and The Best Bizarro Fiction of the Decade.

He lives in the mangy wilderness of Georgia with his wife and dogs.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dustin Reade on November 28, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the things I have always loved about Louis L'Amour is that, in all of his books, each chapter usually starts with some kind of scene description. Like, he'll talk about the way the sun looks as it crest over a sand dune in the distance. He then pans back in his description and introduces the characters. For example: the thing about the sun and the sand dunes? That gets explained in great detail and then he reveals that it is on this same dune upon which our hero is riding his trusty horse after that last battle with the Indians. Or cowboys. Whatever.
The point is, I always enjoyed the way he did that. It really laid the scene out nicely and helped me to fully visualize the world he was writing about.

David W. Barbee, in this book, utilizes the same device, and to marvelous effect. (should that have been "affect"? I can never tell. Oh well.)

Seriously, the descriptions in this book are top-notch. They are vivid and fully realized, and Barbee utilizes all sorts of literary devices to help the reader grasp them. And it works.
The town of Suckhole is here in all its Mud-Soaked Glory. The characters, though hilariously stereotypical, were nonetheless fully realized--not to mention visualized.
That's a neat trick. The whole "show-don't-tell" thing. It works. And David W. Barbee can do it like a sumbitch.
Not to mention, this book is filled with some really startling ideas. Like, the origin story of Dexter Spikes? blew my effin' MIND! Probably because I am fascinated with evolution, and to see it used in this way was a treat, to say the least.

Also, this book basically had everything a fan of weirdo-lit could possibly want: Giant Bugs, Robots, Cleft-Lipped Rebels, A Murder Mystery, severed genitals, and so on. It is one hell of a honky-tonk hoedown and it is worth every penny and every minute.

I think you should probably read it.
Today.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
if there ever was a grind house book. This would be it,, sex, violence, mutants, the post-apocalyptic South. A must read.
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Format: Paperback
"A Town Called Suckhole" isn't a great novel, but it has one of the strongest, funniest first chapters of any novel I've ever read. The rest of the book revels in stereotype with a dash of Troma film. If you're like me and you find that sort of thing entertaining, then consider this a five-star review.
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Format: Paperback
David Barbee first came to my attention when he wrote Carnageland for the New Bizarro Author Series. I didn't get a chance to read that one but I remembered the name when he put out his next book, A Town Called Suckhole. I've always been a sucker for post-apocalyptic fiction so I eye-balled this one for awhile. It wasn't until he ran a special for a signed copy of his book that I finally bought it. I'll just go ahead and mention that when I got the book in the mail Barbee threw in a bunch of extra goodies like comic books and trading cards, he's just a swell guy.

The meat of the book takes place after the War of Northern Aggression was ended with the dropping of nuclear bombs. The world had been destroyed but the south was able to rise up with the help of such great rednecks as George W Foxworthy, Jeezus, and the beloved St. Hank. They helped in the creation of the town of Suckhole. Fast forward some odd years and it's time for the Hell-Yeah Heritage Jamboree. Someone has been brutally killing the town's folk. It's up to the sheriff, his son, and a monster that doesn't exist named Dexter Spikes to figure it before the start of the Jamboree. Things end up getting pretty crazy and violent.

There's so much about this book to like. Suckhole is filled to the brim with a crazy cast of characters. From Sheriff Billy Jack Bledskoe with his horrible cleft lip to Skynyrd Lee Faulkridge and the rest of the steroid pumped Militia. Chances are you've never read about characters like this before, and Barbee has the chops to write them real and unforgettable. Some of my favorites would be the sentient robotic moonshine stills, with their need to one up each other.

There are lots of references to the south and country music in this book.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
This book gave me a southern accent and probably some diseases. This is the bizarro anti-tribute to redneck culture that Squidbillies wishes it could be. It's a page turner with a city smashing climax that totally pays off.
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By Adam Schemke on December 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book definitely lives up to it's claim as being the 'weirdest Southern Gothic ever'. Set in a hellish future it's full of revisionist history even crazier than any current redneck could conjure. For a Yankee like myself Suckhole was utterly terrifying, as well as howlingly funny.
A book full of characters that at are once recognizable and shockingly grotesque (in a extremely good way). A post-apocalyptic story like none I've ever read and enjoyable from start to crazy finish. This is hopefully the first book in a long career for Mr. Barbee because he gave us one humdinger of a debut novel.
Take that Abraham Hussein Lincoln!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
----What's 23 feet long and has 14 teeth?----
----The line for funnel cake at the Suckhole Jamboree.----

This book reads like an extreme version of the old computer game, Redneck Rampage.

IF you can avoid the mutant hillbiiilies, werepossums, froxes, and giant mosquitos, the swamp witches are waiting to eviscerate you and steal your manhood in the nastiest way possible.

Make it to the end of the game/book, and you get to face .... Hank Williams, Jr.

Yee-haw!
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