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Tracking Apollo to the Moon Hardcover – May 18, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-1852332129 ISBN-10: 1852332123 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 426 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (May 18, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852332123
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852332129
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,410,129 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hamish Lindsay has done a marvellous job of telling the story of manned space flight   He has given his readers a sort of encyclopedia of the beginning of man's quest for flight into space. This is followed with a splendid description of the real time operations of all of the major missions. As one who lived through the Camelot period of space in the 60s and knows the trauma we all endured, I am greatly impressed with the detail and authenticity of the stories that Hamish so vividly tells. For example, as I read Hamish's account of the Apollo 11 and 13 missions, I could again imagine myself back in mission control reliving some of the finest moments of my life...Those of you who are fortunate to read Hamish Lindsay's account will be much richer for it."
- FROM THE FOREWORD BY CHRISTOPHER C. KRAFT, JR.,
NASA's First Flight Director and Retired Director of the NASA Johnson Space Center

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Customer Reviews

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See all 14 customer reviews
Kudos to the editorial staff that reviewed this book before publication as it is one of the few books I have read without glaring factual errors.
Amazon Customer
In essence, I am truly overwhelmed by the work and love that has gone into this book, and both the author and publishers deserve credit for a truly magnificent job.
Colin Burgess
This book is both a superb introduction to the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo/Skylab programs and a valuable addition to the collection of any space enthusiast.
Dr. Eric M. Jones

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Colin Burgess on June 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I've been researching and writing about spaceflight history since the early 1960's and have amassed a library on the subject of several hundred books. I do not know Hamish Lindsay personally, so I can be objective in my review, but when I was told about a book he'd written as someone involved in tracking the Apollo flights from Australia I thought it might have been interesting but probably overly technical. The reality is that this is a brilliant book, and both the author and publishers have combined to bring us one of the best and most vividly illustrated stories ever of the space era I grew up in. The text is divided into engrossing vignettes detailing all of the manned spaceflights as well as many of the more spectacular robotic missions, and Hamish is an extraordinarily good story-teller. The fact that it is told from an Australian viewpoint is refreshingly novel, but this should not deter overseas readers - rather, it will intrigue them. I found many excellent stories and quotes new to me in the text, and it is certainly an exciting new reference book that I will refer to often. Many Apollo-era astronauts have contributed their memories to the book, and the glowing introduction by Chris Kraft is essential reading before embarking on the text. It is obvious that Hamish sought to use many photos never seen before in his book (quite a number in brilliant colour), and these are used to wonderful effect. On first reading I could only find three very minor errors, and one of these is a typo, so there has certainly been some meticulous research,writing, and editorial work done before publication. In essence, I am truly overwhelmed by the work and love that has gone into this book, and both the author and publishers deserve credit for a truly magnificent job. It will become a classic among space books.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Peter Mackay on June 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I had the privilege of meeting Hamish today at a book signing, and though I know a fair bit about space exploration, and I've read just about every book on the US and Soviet space projects, today I felt closer than ever before to the men who made this great adventure possible. Hamish, in a few words, made clear to me the incredible difficulties of controlling spacecraft and retrieving information from a vast distance. The environment is absolutely unforgiving and there are no second chances. The planning and the execution have to be perfect.
The book itself is astounding. It is far more image-rich than any of the recent memoirs and histories, with photographs, maps, diagrams, cartoons, paintings on every page, rather than a few black and white shots grouped in the middle. The images themselves are chosen with care and matched to the text - I was impressed with two of the earliest photographs of the Lunar Module, almost lost against the immensity of the lunar landscape, a reminder of just how fragile and precious was this little bubble of Earth.
Sometimes it seems as if I've read the same story of Apollo many times over from slightly different viewpoints, with just a few little nuggets of "newness" to savour. With this book, Hamish has given us a whole new perspective on the adventure, and I've got to say that he has also given this reader a feeling of excitement and enthusiasm that is hard to gain from the more buttoned-down writings of the US astronauts, flight controllers and engineers.
It might be a cliche, but this book puts you there.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. Bostick on June 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Hamish Lindsay has accomplished what few other manned space program writers have; he has captured the excitement of the Apollo Program from the viewpoint of a participant, has led into it with an historical perspective of man's quest for the stars, and has sprinkled it with historical data, photographs and cartoons which results in an outstanding record of not only what happened during Apollo, but why.
I believe this book will be for future generations THE authorative record of one of mankind's greatest achievements.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Bartels on June 24, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book would be a great introduction for anyone who hasn't read any previous biographies/details of the Apollo or NASA histories. However for those who have, the book may turn out to be a real disappointment. I'm Australian and was looking forward to a detailed Aussie perspective on the spaceflight industry, but this seems to me to be too brief. Only glimpses are shown of the development of Honeysuckle Creek/Carnarvon tracking stations etc, which may please international readers but not this Aussie!
The book seems to be trying to gain an international audience by overviewing the entire NASA spaceflight chronology, but after a few chapters some of the quotes and phraseology started to appear disturbingly familiar. Why do I get the impression the author has read every other book on the subject and just cut and pasted from each of them? The reference to Al Shepard as 'Smiling Al'/'Icy Commander' will be VERY familiar to some, and is only one example of a number of apparent ... which start to annoy after a while and eventually to the point where I gave up reading. (And why the strange purple print?)There are also some inaccuracies in the text which point to the author not having done original research, but these are not major, only adding to my irritation.
It's not really revelatory except in some brief instances, and won't contain much you haven't read before if you are a space buff. The book is rather shallow and as a previous reviewer found, does not take a definite perspective, which I found a big letdown.
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