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Tracking Time (April Woo Mysteries) Audio, Cassette – Abridged, November, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: April Woo Mysteries (Book 6)
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Americana Publishing; Abridged edition (November 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1588070573
  • ISBN-13: 978-1588070579
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,749,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The appealing Chinese American NYPD detective April Woo is back in this popular series. Psychiatrist Jason Frank has asked for her help in finding Maslow Atkins, a training analyst who's gone missing after a therapy session with his patient Allegra Caldera, a highly disturbed young woman. Maslow was last seen setting off for an evening run through Central Park, so April calls in a canine tracking unit. The dog's discovery of the body of a homeless man who was the only known witness to Maslow's abduction causes a rift between April and her boyfriend Mike Sanchez, the homicide cop who abruptly pulls rank to take over the case. But April stays on Maslow's trail anyway, and soon finds that although Allegra seems to be the logical suspect, two out-of-control teenagers from affluent families may also be involved in the kidnapping and murder. When Allegra turns out to be connected to Maslow in ways neither he nor Jason Frank suspected, the plot takes another fascinating turn.

What makes author Leslie Glass's police procedural series unique (Stealing Time, Judging Time, Loving Time) is the cross-cultural relationship between April and Sanchez, a romance doomed to failure, according to Skinny Dragon, April's endlessly fascinating mother. It took several books in the Time series for April to fall into Mike's well-muscled arms, and if Skinny Dragon has her way, there'll be plenty more before she dances at their wedding. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Six books into Glass's April Woo series (Stealing Time; Judging Time; etc.), the NYPD detective remains one of the more promising yet frustrating characters in crime fiction. Woo is caught between three culturesAher native Chinese, her adopted American and that dictated by the Job. Woo lives at home with her parents, tethered by Chinese morality and lifestyle, yet she is one of the most hard-driving, career-minded detectives on the force. Despite such unusual qualities, she is not particularly companionable. In her latest outing, she's cold and standoffish, stranded in a so-so plot in which she just barely takes center stage. Woo is on the hunt for a missing psychiatrist, Maslow Atkins, who disappears in Central Park during an evening jog. Chief among the suspects is Allegra Caldera, one of Atkins's patients, who may be stalking him. Unknown to Woo, Allegra is also the victim of foul play, kidnapped by the same hoods who snagged Atkins. Together, they are imprisoned in a tiny cave in Central Park, not quite dead but badly beaten. Their tormentors are two spoiled, thrill-seeking teens, David Owen and Brandy Fabman, products of privileged Manhattan backgrounds. Woo struggles through the case, worrying about her minor missteps, fretting about how she's perceived by the higher-ups, wringing her hands over her failings as a daughter and lover. The search ends predictably and without much punch, yet the strength of Glass's story lies in her cultivation of themesAbroken families, culture clash, ambition and prideAas well as her strong portrayals of secondary characters. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

On the whole there are no really convincing humans here & I didn't care what happened to them.
MARGARET& PETER
As a Kindle reader, I've become used to errors created in the translation from print to digital, but the typos in this book were very numerous and distracting.
OMalleycat
Tracking Time is well-plotted with the added dimension and depth of well sketched characters and relationships that keeps you turning the page.
Dot

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on October 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Psychiatrist Dr. Maslow Atkins uses running in Central Park just before twilight to relieve some of his stress. One particular day, a patient, Allegra meets Maslow at the entrance to the park. He reminds her that he will see her in his office tomorrow. However, the next day Maslow fails to show up for an appointment with his mentor Dr. Jason Frank, who calls his friend Lieutenant April Woo to see what happened to Maslow.

April conducts a search even employing a K9 team but all she learns is that a wino witnessed two people attack a third person that might be Maslow. April meets Allegra at the doctor's office, but has no grounds to detain the woman who they find out later is Maslow's half-sister. Allegra is the next one to vanish. April believes two teens associated with both victims have something to do with the incidents, but no one can find them either.

With each new work, the April Woo tales seem to get better which is no mean feat since the quality has always been sky high. April continues to mature, as she becomes stronger due to her new experiences. Her newfound independence begins to separate her from a dependence on her Chinese relatives and the rest of the Chinese community. Leslie Glass uses her beguiling heroine to provide a humanized police investigation that turns TRACKING TIME into a wonderful treat for anyone who enjoys a great story starring a strong individual with a touch of romance to add flavoring to a tasty stew.

Harriet Klausner
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Nick G on October 11, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When Dr. Maslow Atkins, a young New York psychiatrist, goes for his jog in Central Park and does not come out, an immediate investigation is prompted...
Leading the investigation is detective sergeant April Woo.
After being urged by friend Jason Frank, to look into the psychiatrist's disappearance, April will dive into every aspect of Maslow's life, as well as his patient's...including a young girl who likes to cut herself and harbors a dark secret.
Even when the entire police force puts pressure to close the case, April, will proceed to look for the missing doctor and solve the case.
"Tracking Time" is another great entry in an already excellent series. April Woo is the toughest, smartest and most genuine of all characters in suspense fiction, and Leslie Glass continues to turn out fresh, suspensful plots with each new novel she writes.
Any fan of suspensful, police procedurals should look to the April Woo series for a great read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dot on November 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Tracking Time, the most recent book in this series that features Detective Sergeant April Woo suceeds not only as a thrilling suspense novel but a disturbing look at today's society. April takes on the whole department as she searches for missing psychoanalytic student Maslow Atkins and uncovers shocking family secrets and teen violence right out of today's headlines.
Tracking Time is well-plotted with the added dimension and depth of well sketched characters and relationships that keeps you turning the page.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By sweetmolly on December 3, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Tracking Time" could happen in no other place. The urban wilds of Central Park, the pseudo-sophistication of the very young, the myriad of indulgences available, the hyper-success driven adults, and the pounding pace of life are unique to New York City.
Ms. Glass deftly presents an excellent suspense story that has its small surprises throughout, but is not a whodunit. The strongest area of the narrative is characterization; the extremely sympathetic Dr. Maslow Atkins, the thoroughly distasteful over-privileged teenagers, the self-absorbed parents, and the homeless bum, PeeWee. The regulars: April Woo, Skinny Dragon, Mike Sanchez, and Jason Frank remain fresh in this series.
The tale hinges on Dr. Atkins disappearance. He takes off for his regular jog in the park at dusk, not even carrying his billfold, and drops from sight. He is known as a man of very regular habits, and when he fails to show up for an appointment, Dr. Frank is concerned enough to call in his friend Detective April Woo. The suspense notches sharply upward when we find out the would-be killers were interrupted in their attack on Dr. Atkins, and have hidden the wounded man in a culvert in a remote part of Central Park. Will the killers come back and finish the job? Will the police and K-9 dogs locate him first? Will Dr. Atkins somehow effect his own release? I found the scenario a real page-turner.
I get exasperated with April, who goes from a splendidly efficient police officer to giggling girlishness over her infatuation with chauvinistic Mike. However, this is an ongoing trait in the entire series, and I put up with it as you do with a friend who seems to have a glaring weakness. A larger theme of the story is how children who "have everything" can go so disastrously wrong.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. Bukowsky HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is the first novel that I have read by Leslie Glass. "Tracking Time" explores the lives of the rich and selfish. Two teenagers named David and Brandy have parents from hell. Their parents are too wealthy and self-absorbed to know what is going on in their kids' lives. Brandy and David are twisted and bitter youngsters who embark on a campaign of violence and terror for the sake of a few thrills. The protagonist, Detective April Woo, is investigating the disappearance of psychiatrist Maslow Atkins and she senses that Brandy and David are somehow involved. There is little suspense here, since Glass lets us know up front who did what to whom. April has little to do in the way of investigating. The novel's best moments come from the analysis of the protagonists' lives. We learn about April's tortured relationship with her mother, whom she calls (disrespectfully) "Skinny Dragon," and with her good-looking lover, Mike Sanchez, who loves April but has a roving eye. The most wicked and enjoyable writing is reserved for the parents in the book and the two teens, who are all spoiled and nasty people. Glass is sarcastic and funny in the way that she dissects these warped individuals. The novel is well-paced and the dialogue is crisp and often amusing. "Tracking Time" is entertaining and I recommend it for fans of psychological suspense.
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