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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars `Trading Option Greeks' Speaks Fluent English
I believe that a mentor's aim is to impart his knowledge based on many years' experience so that his scholar student excels the mentor. Mr. James B. Bittman must be a great mentor, since Passarelli's book not only matches the excellence of Bittman's book (`Trading Options as a Professional') but exceeds that lofty level.

This book is not for the Beginner in...
Published on December 26, 2009 by Ramal Murali

versus
122 of 130 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Its alright
When I bought this book, I was expecting really in-depth analysis of various Greeks and their effects on basic option positions as well as complex spreads. However, I was bit disappointed.

If you have read any decent preliminary option trading books (Natenberg, McMillan et al) or if you have been trading option spreads for say 1+ year, this book would be...
Published on September 17, 2008 by Aniruddha Pant


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122 of 130 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Its alright, September 17, 2008
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
When I bought this book, I was expecting really in-depth analysis of various Greeks and their effects on basic option positions as well as complex spreads. However, I was bit disappointed.

If you have read any decent preliminary option trading books (Natenberg, McMillan et al) or if you have been trading option spreads for say 1+ year, this book would be useless. In aggregate there would be about 10-12 page material which may useful for such people. Last chapter on relationships between implied and realized volatility is OK.

For some reason the author has morbid fear for graphs of positions and greeks. He ends up giving tables after tables to illustrate effect of various greeks on option position.

If you are at a stage where you think I buy call option when I am bullish and I buy put option when I am bearish, this book will help you understand the effects of other equally important variables in pricing and trading, but then there are so many other which give this information in a better fashion in my opinion.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars `Trading Option Greeks' Speaks Fluent English, December 26, 2009
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
I believe that a mentor's aim is to impart his knowledge based on many years' experience so that his scholar student excels the mentor. Mr. James B. Bittman must be a great mentor, since Passarelli's book not only matches the excellence of Bittman's book (`Trading Options as a Professional') but exceeds that lofty level.

This book is not for the Beginner in Options Trading. Options are derivative instruments; their prices are derived from the prices of the underlying securities. The theoretical price of options may be calculated using the Nobel Prize winning Black-Scholes model with six inputs: stock price, strike price, time to expiration, risk-free interest rate, dividends, and annual volatility of stock price (the standard deviation of the short-term returns over one year). The Greeks (delta, gamma, theta, vega and rho) express the sensitivity of the options price with respect to the price of the underlying, time to expiration, volatility, and interest rate. The establishment of options on VIX (CBOE's Volatility Index, popularly known as the Fear Index) enabled traders to trade volatility itself; Passarelli's book provides an excellent guide for such traders to understand the Greeks (including volatility Vega, an adopted Greek!).

In Chapter 1, Passarelli imparts the Basic knowledge to the reader interested in option trading, in a mere 20 pages of crisp, crystal clear exposition of the basic option strategies and the profit and loss diagrams (the risk profile). I strongly recommend that this chapter be read at least twice to ensure that the concepts presented are well understood. I wish the authors (of well written books on Option Trading) would point out that Call Buyer and Call Seller are participating in a `Zero-Sum Game' and the Buyer's gain is the Seller's Loss and vice versa. The Zero-Sum game is evident when the Profit and Loss diagrams for Long Call (Call bought) and Short Call (Call sold) are clearly presented as mirror reflections of each other (with the mirror along the horizontal price axis).

Greek Philosophy in Chapter 2 provides a good presentation of the Greeks and a clear explanation of the Put-Call parity (or as the author learned in his early professional life: Call is a Put, Put is a Call). In the author's own words `this book is meant to be less a how-to manual than a how-come tutorial.' However, I believe the `How-to' is the harder part for the reader to grasp and the reader could benefit immensely from any guidance provided by the author in this regard. Knowledge is enlightening, but profit is elusive. How does the reader apply the `Greek Philosophy' to accomplish successful trades?

In the discussion of the Historical Volatility, the author is a little unclear regarding the normal vs. log normal distribution assumption in the Black-Scholes model. The model assumes a normal distribution of returns of the underlying security, which is same as saying the underlying security price distribution is lognormal (has a longer right tail compared to a normal distribution). As the author states: Historical Volatility is the annualized standard deviation of the daily returns. Implied Volatility is the volatility input to the pricing model that will produce a theoretical price matching the market price of the security (between the Bid and Ask prices).

While discussing implied volatility (p 58) the author describes volatility trading brilliantly as follows. In the mind of a volatility trader option prices are translated into volatility levels. The actual prices of the options themselves are much less relevant to this type of trader. If such a trader buys options when volatility is low anticipating increased volatility, profits are assured when volatility does indeed rise. The author states succinctly: A trader who thinks a stock is going to rise will buy the stock. A trader who thinks IV (implied volatility) is going to rise will buy options.

Chapter 4, Option-Specific Risk and Opportunity is worth its weight in gold for any reader interested in learning how to trade options. For example, the P&L illustration of Kim and her Long ATM call scenario shows the hockey stick region bounded by the P&L graph at trade time (44 days prior to expiration) and the kinky line showing the P&L at expiration with breakeven at $36.10. This discussion could be further enhanced if the author does not go overboard with the notion that Greeks rule the trade and stock is of little consequence. The reason we look at Greeks (instead of just stock movement) is `divide and conquer (understand)'. The Greeks are (partial) derivatives of the option theoretical price with respect to the associated parameter input in the pricing model (while the other parameters are held constant). The bottom line is this: if stock rises she wins and if it falls she loses. Pascarelli's excellent analysis familiarizes the reader with the Greeks to such an extent that the Greeks (including the adopted one, Vega) are not strangers anymore! The Greeks are good company, but ultimately you profit with the stock that you brought to the option dance. I would highly recommend that the reader re-read and absorb the six pages of the Long ATM Call before proceeding with the rest of the chapter. The page long discussion on `Finding the Right Risk' is an excellent way for the reader to weigh the question: trade stock or option?

In Chapter 6, the author makes the concept of Put-Call parity very easy to understand so that the terms `Synthetic Positions' and `Arbitrage' are nor scary creatures any more. The beginning/intermediate reader may just skim through this chapter since `market makers are among the only traders who can trade positions profitably...'.Besides, if you need a `Box' full of `Jelly Rolls' you can always visit the nearest Dunkin Donuts!

The next several chapters cover advanced topics which in the author's words `have a lot of moving parts and can be intimidating to the new comers'. I consider myself a beginning/intermediate trader and believe in understanding the concepts well before applying them in real world trade scenarios. Even if you decide to skim through or skip some of the advanced discussions, I strongly recommend that you read the four pages (314-318) on `How Market Makers Manage Delta-Neutral Positions'. Here you get a good understanding of what made Mr. Pascarelli a good market maker and now a good teacher for readers like me. Also, the final chapter on `The Trader's Thought Process' has some good advice for the reader.
Volatile Markets Made Easy: Trading Stocks and Options for Increased Profits
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great reference book!, April 21, 2009
This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
If you are interested in trading options and have some basic options knowledge, this book is well worth the small investment to gain insight into options trading mechanics. Most options books I have bought do not cover greeks in this amount of detail. When setting up a spread, this book gives a detailed analysis on the effect of each greek in the position. It covers many of the common types of trades.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Up there with the best: trading by the greeks, January 25, 2011
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
"In my top half dozen options books worth buying".

As a long-term trader (and presenter) of options I've read mostly all of the serious options books that would be used as teaching resources. Whilst Natenberg, McMillan, Hull et al are all good there is something particularly honest about this book in it's style: the humor with which the topics are presented. The author carefully explains the greeks over dozens of pages with excellent examples then goes back over the elements of an option's price when a particular strategy is used. He derives and explains the changes as the underlying changes. His description rivals the computer-generated pay-offs. Excellent!

For a while now I have run courses in advanced retail trading (no, that's not a contradiction) but in these elite courses I teach strategies without using the words 'Put' or 'Call'. I'll just use expressions like long delta etc. as, in the end, all options trades are an arrangement of the greeks. Once that is understood positions can be conceptionalised instantly and a trader's probability of success shyrockets. Ultimately this is where this book takes us.

This book is a good introduction to trading by understanding the greeks and, yes, the author uses strategies with puts and calls.

Incidentally buying a good book is, essentially, a low long delta position with very low theta. Gamma this one to your success. But beware: the IV will keep you awake at night thinking of strategies!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for getting to the next level, August 10, 2010
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
After starting to trade options I got burned on some bad decisions. Typical of starting out but what really killed me was not accounting for/understanding Theta. The "intro" book I read didn't cover this. Trading Option Greeks is perfect in that it's easy enough to follow but comprehensive enough to cover the Greeks...integral to options. Looking back I now see how option trading without understanding these concepts was foolish. This book covers some complex concepts which sometimes meant reading sections twice. This said, it's worth every penny. Just buy this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must Know Information, December 15, 2009
This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
This book contains an unbiased review of option strategies. Although more experienced traders may find nothing new, novice traders should read and understand all the information in this book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trading Option Greeks, June 15, 2009
By 
Donald Stanton (Paradise, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
I have read the first three chapters so far. The book is well written and is loaded with examples of detailed explinations of the principles taught. The early chapters appear to lay the foundation for more complex strtagies that are presented later in the book. For me the book is an excellent recourse.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Trading Greeks, April 15, 2014
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
I need to read at least one more time before I could absorb all this book explains.
It gets into the nitty gritty of the components of the Black Scholes option pricing model.
It explains why each component is important and when, as well as, how, they affect each other.
Read this book with a white board handy because you will need to draw diagrams to fully understand it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book on Options, October 12, 2011
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
This is an excellent book on options especially because of how easy it is to understand complex concepts. The chapter on option arbitrage made market maker style trades such as reversals/conversions, boxes and jelly rolls very clear. I also found the chapters that described how the greeks change on each strike when different variables change to be helpful. For example, if vols rise or fall, what happens to the out of the money, in the money and at the money vegas, deltas and gammas. For people looking to advance their options to the next level I highly recommend Trading Option Greeks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book on trading the Greeks!, March 30, 2011
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This review is from: Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial) (Hardcover)
I really liked this book! It's a comprehensive introduction to the Greeks, and it was easy to read although it took me a while since I realized I have so much to learn that's not taught in options classes. I learned a great deal from reading it: the information was well organized with great examples also. Would definitely recommend it to traders who are not aware of how trade the Greeks.
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Trading Option Greeks: How Time, Volatility, and Other Pricing Factors Drive Profit (Bloomberg Financial)
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