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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Learning to Grow and Trust Your Instincts
First what this book is not: Not a "how to" book on stock trading. Not a primer for beginning investors. Not a treatise on any particular trading style. Therefore, "Trading from Your Gut" is not by itself a sufficient source of training for becoming a stock trader. But these "nots" are what make Mr. Faith's book unique and valuable - there is no other book that...
Published on February 14, 2010 by Happy Camper

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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Stuff, But Not Enough of it to Fill a Book
In this book, former Turtle Curtis Faith takes a different approach from the trading systems orientation of his earlier Way of the Turtle. It's one that would seem to contradict his earlier focus on systems. After all, instinct and gut feel would seem to be the complete opposite of system trading. It's not really that simple, though.

At the core, Trading from...
Published on March 4, 2010 by John Forman


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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Stuff, But Not Enough of it to Fill a Book, March 4, 2010
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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In this book, former Turtle Curtis Faith takes a different approach from the trading systems orientation of his earlier Way of the Turtle. It's one that would seem to contradict his earlier focus on systems. After all, instinct and gut feel would seem to be the complete opposite of system trading. It's not really that simple, though.

At the core, Trading from Your Gut is about integrating the right-brain instincts and intuition you develop as a trader with the left-brain rational side from which systematic analysis and trading tends to flow. Faith spends a fair amount of time arguing for why that is important. In fact, the better part of the book could be said to fall into that area. The idea is that combining the two parts of your brain will make for much better results than either one on its own.

Now, having said that, Faith considers the swing trading timeframe the most optimal for trading with both sides of your brain. Real short-term trading, he contends, favors a more intuitive approach, while the timescales of long-term trade suit a more left-brain approach because there's plenty of time to think things through rationally. It's worth noting that an awful lot of traders seem to want to go the other way, make gut calls on long-term trades, but use mechanical systems for short-term trading.

If you're looking for short-cuts to develop intuition, though, you're out of luck. Faith tells you what you should already know - that you can only really do that by trading. That said, he does provide some tips for making the process more efficient and effective. There is, of course, a lot of trading psychology discussion in the book, which given the subject matter shouldn't come as a surprise. In fact, Van Tharp wrote the foreword.

As much as I do believe this is a worthwhile subject, I think Faith had to do a lot of stretching to get it to be a book. There is clearly a lot of filler at the end to get close to the 200 page count, including a discussion of the forex book he has in the works. I think when you boil down to the meat of what he's trying to get across you really only have a couple chapters. My personal feeling is that this material, at least as it is currently developed, would have been better off as a section on a more expansive book on trader development, or even trading systems.

My bottom line is that overall I came away a bit disappointed in a kind of "does not fulfill its potential" sort of way. I don't think this was Faith's best effort. It doesn't disuade me from wanting to see what is next book offers, though.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Learning to Grow and Trust Your Instincts, February 14, 2010
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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First what this book is not: Not a "how to" book on stock trading. Not a primer for beginning investors. Not a treatise on any particular trading style. Therefore, "Trading from Your Gut" is not by itself a sufficient source of training for becoming a stock trader. But these "nots" are what make Mr. Faith's book unique and valuable - there is no other book that provides the same very valuable perspective.

His basis thesis - it's right there in the subtitle - is that a stock trader needs to use both his analytical and his intuitive abilities. He emphasizes that with practice the human mind can recognize general patterns in graphs and data that are very difficult for a computer to discern. The ability to immediately "see" that a stock is bouncing off of a support line or that it is "rolling over" may be a very reliable indicator that it is time to buy or to sell, and it often can be obvious with little more than a glance. For a busy trader in a fast-moving market, this special ability of the "right brain" is invaluable.

So, if your are a serious stock trader, the value of the book is in supplementing whatever traiding methods you may be using. It will give you confidence to trust your visual impressions and gut instincts even when you may not have the analytical backup for your decision, and especially when the analytics and intuition line up.

The author is a good storyteller and offers illustrations from a wide varitey of fields. His depth of personal experience and history of successful trading lends credibility to his ideas. I recommend this book as a very worthy addition to any stock trader's collection. It brings into focus what all us traders have sensed - that sometimes we just seem to know what to do without pulling out the calculator. Mr. Faith explains that this is not mysticism, but just another output of an experienced stock trading brain.
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28 of 35 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This Material Is Dangerous, September 11, 2010
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This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
I am a currency trader and have a read a decent amount of trading books covering technical analysis, fundamental analysis, and market/trading psychology. This was a tough one to finish. Trading the way Faith suggests in this book is a foolish venture. The content is riddled with holes and the psychology behind what he is saying will not help you be a better trader. I do agree that any person experienced in their field has a certain intuition that runs in the background of their thinking, but this intuition is based on years of study of actual principles tested in real life situations. It's not based on guessing or a "feeling" as that sort of approach is detrimental to trading.

Trading is a skill, and a difficult skill to master. The odds are stacked against you, maybe more than any other professional field. The last thing you want to be doing is making "gut" decisions. A recent best selling book by Malcolm Gladwell, titled Blink, deals with these same concepts you find in Faith's book, and while Gladwell's book is entertaining to read it is not something you should apply to trading. The element of risk that exists in trading is often what lures us into the fight. In the middle of that fight the uncertainty that looms has to be distilled and managed in order to make a decision. The only way to do this is by applying a set of time tested methods coupled with much practice.

A friend of mine recently put a big chunk of money with a forex trader. After 2 trades that resulted in a 50% draw on the account capital he asked the account manager what the heck he was doing putting so much of the capital at risk, and when he questioned the manager about a current losing trade he was in the guy's response was "don't worry, it will turn around." That is the sort of thing that results from the mentality you find in Faith's book. It produces this type of approach to the markets and it ruins accounts.

If you are serious about trading, then steer clear from the material in this book. It's your money at stake.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sounds like my broker - or a pol spending other people's money, December 15, 2010
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This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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There is no question that intuition, i.e. GUT, plays a part in success. No less business luminary Jack Welch strongly advocates that idea. Problem is, as Jack confirms, that having a 'gut' that leads well only comes from years of experience. In other words you have to fail many times to develop the sense of what works and what doesn't. Truth is - training, education, and operating from proven principles is a better method, at least until your gut has been developed. A better path for those of us who have our own money at stake.

Trading From Your Gut may simply be over my head. The book starts out from the analogy of playing pool - that success in pool comes from a good stroke. Furthermore good strokes are ruined by over thinking. That is the book's thesis - that over thinking stock trading, data, systems, etc. will ruin trading success. The rest of the book develops this theme with many examples. Unfortunately there is very little how to or empirical evidence.

Trading From Your Gut was an enjoyable read and if you take it with a grain of salt some valuable lessons can be learned. However I wouldn't rely on these ideas. Like Poker, you might get lucky on the river card but the odds are against you, highly against you. I'll stick with candlesticks, analysis and data - at least until my GUT is developed.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pleasure to Read; Great Examples, January 10, 2010
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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I'm always skeptical of books on how to make money in the markets. They often tout the author's services, perhaps as a mutual or hedge fund manager. Some celebrated bestsellers such as Stocks for the Long Run by Jeremy Siegel, which forcefully advocated The Efficient Market Hypothesis and also that markets always go up over the long run, get discredited over time by reality. And what is a stock share after all when management can bail out by granting themselves generous options and bonuses even while their corporations head for bankruptcy?

The first thing about Curtis Faith, the author, is that he doesn't discuss participation in the markets as investing. It's all speculation, and maybe he's correct. If it's really speculation sold to us as investments, then it follows that our participation in the markets should be as a trader, not buy-and-hold. It may be different for Buffett as he tends to control seats on the boards of corporations in which he's deeply invested. If you have some control, then maybe it's better to use the buy-and-hold approach.

But I liked this book because Faith described the nature of intuition (right brain) in trading. You don't have to believe your position in a certain security is an investment. You just try to lock in a gain and get out ahead using a method and intuition together. Since you return to a cash position frequently, you might feel freer to let your intuition play a role. Otherwise, if you try buy-and-hold, you end up hoping the economy will improve since that is your only way to win.

My favorite example from this book was about the famous Argentine Formula One racer Juan Manuel Fangio. In a particular Monaco Grand Prix race, Fangio made an observation and used intuition to override what any racer would otherwise do, and it saved the day for him. This showed how we have to remain flexible enough to override our system when events happen quickly, such as what Tom Cruise did as a pilot in the movie Top Gun.

Trading From Your Gut has lessons about trading the stock market and can be generalized to lessons about much of life. It tells you that you always have to trust your intuition and be ready to change your plan suddenly even if all you have to go on is intuition. It tells you to be confident in yourself on this level. I'd recommend this very short, easy to read book to anybody that wants to trade securities for a living. However, such an individual would want to read perhaps a couple hundred books, as it is difficult to consistently earn money trading.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Right Brain Or Left, But Right Informed By Left, July 17, 2010
By 
frankp93 "frankp93" (Connecticut United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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Curtis Faith has an interesting writing voice, particularly for a trading book author.
There's none of the loudmouth, faux-streetwise braggadocio that makes you want to
throw some trading books against a wall (or through a TV screen).

(Disclosure: I worked around Wall Street in the 80's, hung out in bars with the likes of these guys and generally found them to be as obnoxious then in their twenties as many of them still seem to be now in their fifties.)

In refreshing contrast, Curtis Faith uses jarringly simple and direct language in a prose style that reads so relaxed you might start to wonder if he's some kind of naïve trading savant or a satori-infused Zen monk of the markets. Rest assured Faith has the rational/analytical side of trading covered; what he's presenting to us is his personal viewpoint informed by the ups and downs of life since his early success as a Turtle.

In "Trading From Your Gut", Faith applies the popular Right/Left Brain metaphor to what he regards as the yin and yang approaches of a large majority of traders. The left-brainers are the quants, the technicians who tend to be either strict followers of one or more trading systems, or are certain that any trade they make can be justified by analysis. On the right side are the intuitive traders who are all about feel, emotion, and the psychology of the market - on the surface the very antithesis of the quant worldview, but Faith suggests there's plenty of common ground to be cultivated.

With a title "Trading From Your Gut", Faith is obviously focusing on readers who lean toward an analytical, technical approach and could use some loosening up of their intuitive side.

As an aside, I first encountered the Right/Left Brain metaphor in Betty Edwards' classic, "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" - still in my opinion one of the most effectively organized instructional books I've ever read on any subject (there's a review for you).

I've also read that over the years aspects of Roger Sperry's initial brain research have been challenged and it's now fairly well-established that - yes - there certainly are different areas of the brain that handle different functions but - no - they're not quite so cleanly and discretely partitioned into hemispheres and they don't perform quite so independently as first thought.

Regardless, Right/Left Brain is a vivid metaphor that's ingrained in our culture and there's little popular itching to replace it.

Having read Faith's previous book, "Way of the Turtle", I found it hard at first to regard him was anything but a dyed-in-the-wool left-brainer. In "Trading From Your Gut" however, he claims upfront that he was always of both minds - rational and intuitive - as was his Turtle mentor Richard Dennis.

Faith also displays an admirable humility by admitting 1) the methods he used to great success as a Turtle - primarily trend-following breakouts - don't work as well anymore (presumably because so many institutional traders incorporate the strategy into their programs and systems). 2) Rather than claiming like others to have found the Holy Grail of Trading Approaches, his own decision-making continues to evolve as it embraces over time even more of an intuitive approach.

Instead of applying his insights to a wide variety of trading methods, Faith selects a single, popular strategy, swing trading, and demonstrates how a "whole-brain informed" trader might approach it combining both intuitive and analytical tools. He chooses swing trading because the days-to-weeks time frame of an average trade provides sufficient opportunity for practice. And he believes practicing decision making with real money on the line is ultimately the only way to become truly comfortable doing it.

A major point of the book is that to benefit from intuitive insight traders (and decision makers in general) have to reduce the fear and anxiety they often feel over the decision making process. Using fast-paced day trading to illustrate would likely have been inappropriate for most readers - including myself. (Although someone attuned and comfortable with the pace of day trading would certainly benefit from what Faith has to say.)

Faith's right brain techniques include focusing on patterns in charts rather than the numbers they represent to develop a faster, more efficient way to sift for trading opportunities. At first glance this doesn't appear to be a particularly original idea, with pattern matching tools now standard on most broker websites. But Faith's point is that relying superficially on something such as patterns is just as limiting - and potentially risky - as being constrained by an overly analytical approach. The two sides must reinforce and continually nourish one another.

The final few pages of the book, ironically the afterword, really ties together Faith's strongest points effectively - so much so that I wish he'd presented similar thoughts much earlier in the text. Here Faith discusses techniques to reduce the fear and uncertainty that keep many people from trusting their intuition and clinging instead to an oftentimes false sense of security in hard facts and numbers.

As hinted at above, I have to say a weakness of the book is the overall organization of the material.

Even preface-writer Van Tharp indicated he glossed over the early chapters on well-known examples of Behavioral Finance due to his own background in psychology. Frankly a lot of this will be very familiar to anyone who regularly reads books or articles on money management and investing. I felt a lot of it wasn't essential to Faith's argument and could have been omitted or shortened.

While weighing in at barely 200 pages, the book took an unusually long time to read because the focus drifted between different aspects and examples of intuitive thinking. Perhaps this was inevitable with such a topic. But however interesting the various and sometimes lengthy digressions into brain functioning, grand prix racing, chess, and skydiving were, their ultimate purpose didn't materialize effectively until the end of the book. I got it by the time I reached the end; I just couldn't help at times wishing the book came with its own GPS.

Another small criticism is the use throughout of extracted highlight quotes before they actually appear in the text - often immediately before. I don't know whether the author or editor is the culprit here, but it's a bizarre practice in a book and really gunks up the prose rhythm. If you want to extract quotes for reinforcement, in my opinion, do it after they've appeared at least once.

One last small turn-off for me was being treated to a sneak peek of the next installment in Curtis Faith's "Art of the Trade" trilogy, namely a preview of the author's next book on trading FOREX. Perhaps I'm too much the purist but this kind of promotion at the end always detracts from the experience I've just had and feels like the literary equivalent of a telemarketing call after dinner.

The above criticisms aside, there's clearly good stuff to be found in "Trading From Your Gut": valuable lessons that go far beyond trading, particularly for those who over-analyze decisions to the point of paralysis and are forever hesitant to go against "what the numbers say".

Faith's key point is that rational/intuitive is not an if/else dichotomy. The rational inevitably informs the intuitive, as does the opposite. The more you understand the analytical side of what you're dealing with the more informed your intuitive hunches will be. That's as true of the jazz musician as it is of the athlete as it is of the trader.

"Trading From Your Gut" is a calmly-paced meditation on the author's continually evolving attitude towards decision-making - not just for trading but in all aspects of life.

It's worth a patient and thoughtful read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed. Not helpful at all. Even harmful to the novices, March 8, 2011
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
I like the author's other books. This one really disappointed me. Van Tharp is right in the foreword that those early paragraphs on trading psychology is substandard. He wrote that the rest of the book is much better, which I completely disagree. It's just too hard to tell the key point of it. If I got it right, the author simply tells you to "Do swing trading, mind the charts and trade more", yet there's no practical guideline at all on how you can trade with your gut, or how you can improve your ability to trade with your gut. I am obliged to warn novice traders of the high risk of trading using your gut feeling without solid ground. We are no Soros. In short, not recommended.

p.s.

1. Despite my negative comment above, I still would like to share with you the only three favorite passages of mine there.

Wisdom is the capability to have "strong opinions, weakly held." pg47
The qty of buyers vs sellers doesnt drive the price; it's the relative desperation of those buyers and sellers. pg69
Trading using a long term trend following approach requires the ability to stomach sizeable drawdowns, which most people dont have the emotional construction for. pg99

2. Ironically, I find what can easily summarized the author's pages of elaboration in another book "Erronomics" pg174: The grand (chess) masters had superior memory for the positions of the pieces only when the positions made sense - that is, when they were part of a pattern recognized in the big library. In many cases the knowledge of pattern acquired by experts is so deep, their libraries so vast, they are able to create in their heads mental models of how a sequence of events should play out and quickly - almost instantly - detect problems.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what it sounds like...in a good way (3.5 stars), March 2, 2010
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This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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Sorry. If you want to learn how to day trade, this is not a book for you. If you believe snap judgments and intuition are all you need to trade successfully, this is not a book for you. If you believe making money trading is as easy as "wealth building system" infomercials claim, this is not a book for you.

Who IS this book for, then?

1) Experienced traders looking to expand their skill set.
Faith believes that traders should utilize both logical and intuitive thinking. He argues that relying solely on rational thought processes holds traders back. In order to maximize returns, traders need to actively develop their trading intuition. The key here is "actively". Faith is not advocating trading by emotion or whim. Instead, he thinks trading, similar to driving a car or using a computer, contains many decisions that can become automatic or unconscious through practice and repetition.

2) Investors interested in taking the first steps in moving beyond simple buy-and-hold strategies.
Investors thinking about beginning to trade regularly will find clearly written and easily grasped explanations of core trading concepts in Trading From Your Gut. It's important to recognize, however, that the book is not a how-to guide for newcomers to financial markets. Implementing Faith's strategy will require additional research, design, and testing work on the part of the reader. To this end, the book includes an excellent bibliography and additional reading list.

3) Anybody using trend following or technical analysis trading schemes.
No matter your strategy, it's always a good idea to continually test and challenge your current ways of thinking. Technicians will find some new ways to use their chart reading expertise. Trend followers might be made a bit uncomfortable by a former Turtle poking some holes in trend following orthodoxy--but that's the point!

Bottom line: don't be fooled by the cover of this book. The title, the design, and the flap text all make Trading From Your Gut sound like a forced combination of late night TV commercials and "intuition rocks!" books by the likes of Malcolm Gladwell. It's not. Curtis Faith has written an informative guide to becoming a more well-rounded trader. Having said that, the style of the text may be a bit simplistic for seasoned traders; it relies heavily on anecdotes and is light on charts and quantitative analysis. While this makes the book more accessible to beginners, it also makes reading the book somewhat tedious for more experienced investors. 3.5 stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Light, but different, February 26, 2010
By 
Joseph G. Wick (Los Angeles, California United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
Curtis Faith is famous for his participation in the Turtle program and his previous books on the experience. Overall, this book is more useful to the day-trader than long term investor. You will not find much in the way of "secrets" here. On balance, this is a rather light and short essay on psychological aspects of trading. But, unlike the bulk of recent "trader psychology" books it is not about self-discipline and adherence to one's system.

It is different from many recent trading books in that it advocates using one's intuition rather than mechanical "quant" approaches to trading. More accurately, it urges using intuition in conjunction with the more mechanical approaches. After all, people are not machines and the markets have a "fuzzy" aspect better handled by intuition than reason. Faith has some excellent observations as to why technical analysis (charting) works and the importance of keeping one's system simple. (Essentially, "resistance" and "support" patterns work if, and because,they are obvious to other traders and shape their behaviors)

Noting that intuition is different from emotional feeling, this book provides food for thought for both new and experienced traders. Chapters 7 and 8 are especially noteworthy in helping the reader set up his or her own intuitive mindset and apply it to trading. Chapter 8 makes some excellent points about "training" one's intuition (the right brain) to work smoothly with the reasoning left brain. The author emphasizes using technology to speed up training the intuition. His description of his experiences in skydiving and learning to tango, leading to this principle, is interesting. An example of how to speed this training is the use of trading platforms and stock software that allow you to test intuitive ideas more thoroughly and frequently than through actual trading.

The goal is to be able to act more quickly without so much conscious, labored reasoning. The training is analogous to that used in the military, martial arts, or pilot training to make reactions automatic. On balance, Faith makes a persuasive case for fostering the use of intuition in trading and provides some starting points to give it a try.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Refining your intuition and instinct to make you a better trader, March 12, 2010
This review is from: Trading from Your Gut: How to Use Right Brain Instinct & Left Brain Smarts to Become a Master Trader (Hardcover)
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This is a difficult book to review since traders have been hammered so long with literature telling them to keep their trades as systematic as possible, make rational decisions and keep the emotion out of trading. All of a sudden here comes Curtis Faith with a book telling us how we can trade from our gut? This could be dismissed as one of the many books written by so-called traders who can't really trade if it weren't for the fact that he's made already millions in the market as one of the original Turtle Traders. So why the about face?

Mr. Faith starts by explaining that there is a difference between trading emotionally and trading from your gut. Left brain thinking is generally considered the mathematical, computational part of the brain that performs calculations and develops theories. Right brain thinking isn't simply emotional, it's also responsible for the intuitive side of our mind that allows master traders to make quick decisions almost without thought. It's what pulls our hand off a hot stove while our left brain is still figuring out what is causing that pain sensation in our hand. It's also what allows us to look at a chart and instantly match patterns better than pattern matching software. As you would expect, discretionary traders tend to be more right brain thinkers whereas system traders tend rely on the left brain. Mr. Faith argues that becoming an optimal trader involves a balance of both.

A chapter is devoted to "wrong brain" thinking, and another to how the markets move (price action), then proceeds to teach us how to train our gut. This reader gets the feeling he has a good friend who is a neurosurgeon as much of the talk revolves around brain areas, neocortexes, limbic areas and the like as he discusses how the phenomenon of intuition came into being. He then moves on to what constitutes a good trade along with a swing trade example he uses. His final examples put everything together along with some actual examples of trades he has made; both good and bad. While this reads like a short book I believe it will benefit traders interested in market psychology. Also, systematic traders who discover (usually in hindsight) that their gut tends to be right may want to take a look.
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