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Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered: New Perspectives on Migration, Sex, Work, and Human Rights (Transnational Feminist Studies) Paperback – June 25, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-1594510977 ISBN-10: 1594510970

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Product Details

  • Series: Transnational Feminist Studies
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Paradigm Publishers (June 25, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594510970
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594510977
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,095,100 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Contributors: Natasha Ahmad, Vachararutai Boontinand, Lin Chew, Melissa Ditmore, John Frederick, Matthew S. Friedman, Josephine Ho, Jagori, Ratna Kapur, Phil Marshall, Jyoti Sanghera, Susu Thatun --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Kamala Kempadoo, Professor in Social Science at York University, Canada, is the author of Sexing the Caribbean: Gender, Race and Sexual Labor (2004) and Global Sex Workers: Rights, Resistance, and Redefinition (1998).

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By DFG on June 21, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An interesting book at an interesting time, when the problem of human trafficking is finally beginning to get the international attention it deserves. Unfortunately, as the book points out, much of that attention is based upon a few overly simplistic assumptions.

The editor and the essayists argue persuasively that greater attention needs to be paid to those forms of trafficking which do not fit into the (mostly inaccurate) stereotype of 'young girl snatched from home and forced into prostitution', and to how trafficking is facilitated by strict migration laws, gender stereotypes and an absence of worker protections.

Those who think trafficking can be stopped by criminalising prostitution, or by denying funding to organisations simply because they don't take an abolitionist line, will find much food for thought here.

If I have one complaint about the book it's that it's too Asian-centric. While that's obviously the part of the world where the trafficking problem is most acute, it wouldn't have hurt to include just one essay about another part of the world.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Patricia L. Aliperti on May 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
Working on my thesis on human trafficking, I have found this book very useful.
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20 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Seth J. Frantzman HALL OF FAME on January 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
Under the guise of being against trafficking but wanting to 'de-sensationalize it' this book in the end argues that all laws against trafficking are in fact really 'racist' laws that are really designed to stop migrant labour and are themselves harming 'indigenous' and 'aboriginal' people. This is a wonderfully crafted scam, a typical scam that uses underlying principles and high language to promote or simply dis-regard the millions of women held in virtual slavery year after year in places as far flung as Bangkok, Prague and New York. No one in their serious mind can claim a law that puts away a person who sells a 12 year old girl into a brothel to work as a slave is really a 'covertly racist law' that 'discriminates' against the 12 year old by not allowing her the freedom of being enslaved. Yet this book bends over backward to do just that, to try to covnince us that in fact if only the 'racist' west stopped pushing its values on the 'east' by telling places like Cambodia that it is wrong to sell 12 year girls who thought they were going to work as chamber maids into brothels is somehow 'racist' becuase, and this is the insinuation, 'that is what cambodian girls are for'. This is a disgusting, wrethed, offence and racist text whose conslusions do a great disservice to the global effort to stop slavery and human trafficking.

Seth J. Frantzman
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3 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Drew Hunkins on July 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
Prostitution between consenting adults (adults!) should've been decriminalized generations ago. The primary reason it's still on our criminal statute books is because of the historical influence the Christian fundamentalists have had on our legislative branches on both the state and federal level. And of course no politician would ever have the chutzpah to get up on the stump to say what needs to be said: legalization of prostitution between consenting adults is the only reasonable solution.

Decriminalization and regulation would go a long way in keeping both the women and men safer. Prostitutes are sometimes the victims of serial killers while their customers are not infrequently the victims of larceny and robbery. Legalization, while not perfect, would help to alleviate some of these issues. Furthermore, the government could tax it and generate some much coveted revenue for cash strapped budgets. It would also help to deal out many of the pimps who parasitically feed off the labors of women in the sex underworld. Legalization is not a panacea; however it is a much sounder public policy than the status quo.

Most men past the age of about 45 have little means of attracting a sexually attractive woman. Moreover, physically handicapped men, ugly men, old men, men with little confidence, have almost no way of winning the charms of a pretty woman. Yet they still have sexual interests that aren't going anywhere. Perhaps one could even argue they have a right to sexual pleasure with a consenting adult. Allowing them to pay for sexual favors from an obliging woman is virtually the only rational solution. Obviously with prostitution being illegal a man cannot visit a prostitute without the dread of getting arrested and ruining life and reputation. This worry must end.
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