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Traffik - Miniseries


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DVD 2-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Actors: Bill Paterson, Lindsay Duncan, Fritz Müller-Scherz, Jamal Shah, Talat Hussain
  • Producers: Peter Ansorge
  • Format: Box set, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Acorn Media
  • DVD Release Date: June 26, 2001
  • Run Time: 315 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005J3CD
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #124,633 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Traffik - Miniseries" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Interview with writer Simon Moore and producer Brian Eastman

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The acclaimed Masterpiece Theatre miniseries and the basis for the Academy Award winning film Traffic. A riveting thriller filmed on location in Pakistan, Hamburg and London, Traffik is and unflinching look at those who grow, sell and use drugs and the futility of efforts to stop them. Starring Bill Paterson (The Singing Detective), Lindsay Duncan (An Ideal Husband) and Julia Ormand (First Knight) in her extraordinary film debut. Three lives intersect explosively on the front lines of the drug war. Jack, a British government minister, thinks diplomacy will prevail until a fact-finding mission to Pakistan coincides with volcanic upheaval in his personal life. Helen, the British wife of a German businessman cough smuggling heroin, discovers her own steely determination to survive. And Fazal, a Pakistani Farmer forced out of his poppy fields, find a far more dangerous occupation.

Customer Reviews

This, the original Traffik, makes the film version look small and choppy and incoherent.
Charlotte Vale-Allen
For instance, both highlight the futility of supply-side-only approach to the drug war, that treatment and other demand-side approaches are necessary.
"alidarbac"
This is a brilliant production with wonderful photography, crisp directing, and top-notch acting.
Richard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Charlotte Vale-Allen VINE VOICE on June 9, 2001
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Traffik is one of the most memorable viewing experiences I've ever had. Not only does it give a very clear view of the economic necessity that is the driving force in the lives of the people who cultivate the poppy fields, but it also gives sharply focused insights into how ill-informed politicians make hay on a hot-potato issue. It's only when the effects of drug abuse come home--to Bill Paterson, the splendid Scottish actor who plays a member of parliament whose daughter falls victim to addiction, and to Lindsay Duncan, the wife of the importer--that we see the lengths people will go to, for all sorts of reasons, to engage in the traffic, going one way or the other. Duncan is extraordinary in this series; her transformation from innocent wife to determined conspirator is stunning. This, the original Traffik, makes the film version look small and choppy and incoherent. Benicio Del Toro's performance in the film is, without doubt, a fine one. But when it takes a viewer at least half the movie to figure out who the good and bad guys are, you've wasted a lot of time. Traffik doesn't waste a single frame. It's a breathtaking ride from start to finish and leaves the film version in the dust.
If you saw the movie and thought it was okay, see the TV series and you'll see something great. Years after the fact, there are scenes in the mini-series that will come back to haunt you. This is a profoundly affecting, deeply compelling drama.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Timothy J Perior on January 22, 2002
Format: DVD
I am a Los Angeles writer and filmmaker that was eager to see the style and magnitude of Traffic when it was released. I found it tragic, powerful and well made with reservations toward the characterization of Michael Douglas and Julia Ormond. I was completely unaware of Traffik. Sometime later Traffik was released (or re-released) on PBS and I sat amazed at the identical plots and characters except I knew I was watching the original and so far superior I was astonished that Traffic dared show its face. On the night of the Academy awards all from Traffic received their awards lauding one another and not a mention of the creative source from which they had drawn...and quartered.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Hamood Rehman on July 4, 2004
Format: DVD
I was one of the few people in the world who watched this mini-series before the Hollywood production. I must admit the Hollywood version was excellent as well, considering the fact that it didn't have time to build up on characters. This miniseries is one of the most gripping and well-made productions ever. Although it is six hours long, you don't feel that it is and don't even remember looking at the clock while watching it. The lengths at which the production team has gone through to make sure everything looks authentic is admirable. This mini-series was filmed at a time when Pakistan was struggling with its poppy production. I'm glad to say that Pakistan has successfully rooted out the poppy cultivation within its borders, thanks to efforts made by this movie and the like. However, Afghanistan has more than made up for the loss.
Overall, an excellent movie, except for a few overdone scenes, especially the last dramatic climactic scene.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By B. Farrell on April 22, 2004
Format: DVD
"Traffik" written by Simon Moore and directed by Alastair Reid is a milestone in recent British television history. It is a beautifully crafted and terrifying vision of the international drugs trade and the effect this trade has on different individuals. It destroys the myth from a Western European viewpoint that heroin begins and ends its life in areas of urban decay and dislocation and gives us an unemotional snapshot of the whole process of its production.
Steven Soderbergh's US adaptation was always going to fail to reach the heights of its British counterpart (although it was a highly worthy effort), and an issue and narrative of this scale needed six hours (at least) to give it gravitas. Each character in "Traffik" is well developed and expertly played: Bill Patterson's Jack Lithgow, the stubborn drugs czar who fails to comprehend the problem he is tasked with solving while simultaneously watching his college educated daughter (Julia Ormond) slip further into heroin addiction; Lindsay Duncan as a drug importer's wife who plays the Lady Macbeth role much more effectively than Catherine Zeta Jones in "Traffic"; Jamal Shah as Fazal, opium farmer turned heroin producer and the closest thing the audience has to having it's conscience openly voiced; Fritz Muller Scherz's single minded Hamburg cop, out to bust the suppliers and dealers no matter what the cost.
One of the main strengths of this mini series is that in never uses too many quick emotional taglines. The viewer is sucked into the storyline of each character and is constantly forced to re-assess their previous assumptions. Fazal is a particularly good example of this.
Read more ›
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By John on April 15, 2004
Format: DVD
Nothing much to add, apart from saying that the region 2 release has been superbly produced, so if you want to avoid the poor US market adaptation and have a multi region player, purchase the region 2 version from Amazon UK.
It was really dumb to change the original subtitling to dubbing.
If you can take it raw, watch Traffik. If you can't, watch the movie.
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