A Tragedy of Democracy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $6.76 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by apex_media
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships direct from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $25. Overnight and 2 day shipping available!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America Hardcover – June 30, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0231129220 ISBN-10: 023112922X Edition: First Edition

Buy New
Price: $23.19
9 New from $13.21 23 Used from $11.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.19
$13.21 $11.99

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Frequently Bought Together

A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America + By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans
Price for both: $49.30

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press; First Edition edition (June 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 023112922X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231129220
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,442,601 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

tour de force

(Nichi Bei Times)

Robinson deftly merges the Pacific Rim experience into one coherent magnum opus.

(Wayne Maeda Nichi Bei Times)

A superb history about one of the more shameful chapters in U.S. history.

(Jeff Kingston The Japan Times)

A superb history about one of the more shameful chapters in U.S. history.

(Jonathan Mirsky Times Literary Supplement)

[A] memorable... revealing book.

(Jonathan Mirsky Times Literary Supplement)

Robinson has clearly mastered his subject, and this book provides a clear, comprehensive account, including facts both well known and obscure.... Highly recommended.

(Choice Magazine 1900-01-00)

Robinson has clearly mastered his subject, and this book provides a clear, comprehensive account, including facts both well known and obscure.... Highly recommended.

(Choice 1900-01-00)

A Tragedy of Democracy serves as a timely reminder of how badly things can get out of control in times of war.

(Rachel Pistol Reviews in History 1900-01-00)

In examining the mistreatment of ethnic Japanese Americans and Canadians as a tragedy of democracy, Greg Robinson has produced a triumph of narrative synthesis, one that will stand as the definitive work of its generation.

(Daryl J. Maeda Journal of American Ethnic History 1900-01-00)

Review

A magnificent tour de force. This book will achieve the status not only of the best extant study on the topic, but also the one most widely adopted in college classrooms and purchased by the general public.

(Arthur Hansen, director of the Japanese American Evacuation History Project)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Another book is possible, always.
Etienne ROLLAND-PIEGUE
Greg Robinson's latest book, A Tragedy of Democracy, is worthy of being the definitive work on Japanese American/Canadian wartime experience.
Gene Oishi
They serve a very useful purpose in getting the story out and the impact on the reader is much more personal when reading these memoirs.
ThisReviewer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Gene Oishi on July 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Greg Robinson's latest book, A Tragedy of Democracy, is worthy of being the definitive work on Japanese American/Canadian wartime experience. As a Japanese American who spent World War II in an internment camp, I have over the past fifty years read nearly every book that has been written on the subject and I wondered what could be added to the mountain of information already available.

Robinson's work on the Japanese Canadian experience was almost totally new to me. I had read Joy Kogawa's novel, Obasan, and summary accounts of what Canadian Japanese endured during the war, but I was stunned to learn in detail the depth of the animosity and vindictiveness of the Canadian government and the harsh treatment it meted out to the hapless Japanese. It made me think that compared to our Canadian kin, we Japanese Americans had it easy. Much of what he wrote of the Latin American situation was also new for me.

But I call it a definitive work not simply because it deals with all of North America and much of the Latin American experience. This is the first book that gives coherence to a widely diversified, multi-faceted story. Until now, if someone was seriously interested in the Japanese American wartime experience, I would have recommended several books, some focusing on history, others on politics, law, sociology, psychology and so on. I think I can now say, "Read Greg Robinson's book." Beyond finding an impressive amount of original material, he took full advantage of all that has been written on the subject; he looked down from the mountaintop, so to speak, and provided a broad perspective that has been lacking.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Etienne ROLLAND-PIEGUE on November 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Greg Robinson takes great pains to justify his decision to add his own entry to the long list of books and documentaries that have addressed the removal and confinement of West Coast Japanese Americans during World War II. He does this out of academic modesty, and the reasons he gives for revisiting a well-trodden path are perfectly valid. But he didn't need to justify himself. A Tragedy of Democracy stands out by itself as an exceptional piece of scholarship. It is a book attuned to our times and circumstances, and it will likely remain the reference on the issue for at least the decade to come.

This being said, I don't want to imply that this is the last possible book on the issue and that it closes the topic from any future enquiry. Another book is possible, always. Just as the author felt compelled to revisit the narrative of Japanese Americans' wartime confinement, other scholars may offer different perspectives on the same issue, or they may use Greg Robinson's research results as a material for their own constructions.

To begin with, the historiography of A Tragedy of Democracy is very American, with its insistence on legal cases and its final plea for constitutional guarantees of democracy. A similar endeavor by a French historian, to take a hypothetical example, would have focussed more on the subjectivity of camp inmates, and would have been more experimental in its writing. The comparison between the United States and Canada's treatment of their West Coast Japanese communities, which forms the hallmark of the book and defines its original contribution, could be extended to the harassment of other minority communities during World War II and to other periods. These would make different books, with different histories to tell.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Janis L. Edwards on June 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A number of academically-oriented books on the internment have emerged recently, opening up the subject as far more complex than the view presented in earlier memoirs. I would put this book as among the very best, along with Alice Yang Murry's "Historical Memories of the Japanese AMerican Internment and the Struggle for Redress," for their detailed and sober examinations of the various dynamics of the civil rights and human saga of Japanese Americans in the twentieth century. These are issues that not only continue to reverberate for an ethnic community, but for the American purpose. For the serious reader, this is an important book. For the academic reader it is indispensable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Seward on October 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Mr Robinson's research about the Japanese American and Japanese Canadian experiences in each country's version of the Enemy Alien Internment Program is superb. No question. However, the few statements that he made about the German American internment experience showed that he did no discernible research into what he had written about German Americans.

Here were a few facts that Robinson either got wrong or didn't bother to mention.

German immigrants were interned as late as 1947, some for as long as five years without trial.

The Crystal City Internment Camp that Robinson refers to in his book was ethnically, about half Japanese and half German. If you go to You Tube and type in Crystal City Camp, you will see an excerpt from a Government produced propaganda film showing both Japanese Americans and German Americans who were locked up together. I have friends who were there.

There were more German American women interned in Hawaii than Japanese American women. I know someone who was there.

The hearings were, by and large, a kangaroo court. German immigrants were not allowed due process anymore than Japanese immigrants were. Neither side was granted Due Process. I know someone who went through the hearings.

German, Jewish, Italian and Romanian Latin Americans were also interned with Japanese Latin Americans.

Jewish refugees from Germany were legally considered German and were so a few of them wound up interned.

Italian immigrants were not immune. The father of baseball great Joe di Maggio was forced off the West Coast for about a year.

Go to CSPAN and type in Enemy Alien Internment and you can watch a more complete lecture on the internment.

I would love just once to find a good book that encapsulates all of the story of Internment, not just Japanese or German.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search