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Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time Hardcover – June 1, 1975

ISBN-13: 978-0945001102 ISBN-10: 094500110X

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1348 pages
  • Publisher: GSG and Associates (June 1, 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 094500110X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0945001102
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 2.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,588 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Carroll Quigley (1910-1977) was a highly respected professor at the School of Foreign Service at Gerogetown University. He was an instructor at Princeton and Harvard; a consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense, the House Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration; and the U.S. Navy.

Customer Reviews

Read page 950!
xerxes88@aol.com
Quigley's Tragedy and Hope is a very important historical work describing the intrigues of powerful financial and industrial interests aiming to dominate the world.
Anne
This is a great book that everyone who wishes to understand the world must read.
Francisco de Varona

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

136 of 145 people found the following review helpful By anarchteacher on June 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
"As a teenager I heard John Kennedy's summons to citizenship. And as a student at Georgetown, I heard the call clarified by a professor I had named Carroll Quigley, who said America was the greatest country in the history of the world because our people have always believed in two great ideas: first, that tomorrow can be better than today, and second, that each of us has a personal moral responsibility to make it so."

When Bill Clinton spoke these stirring words to millions of Americans during his 1992 acceptance address before the Democratic National Convention upon receiving his party's nomination for President of the United States, the vast multitude of his television audience paused for a micro-second to reflect: Who is Carroll Quigley and why did he have such a dramatic effect on this young man before us who may become our country's leader?

Carroll Quigley was a legendary professor of history at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University, and a former instructor at Princeton and Harvard.

He was a lecturer at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, the Brookings Institution, the U. S. Naval Weapons Laboratory, the Foreign Service Institute of the State Department, and the Naval College.

Quigley was a closely connected elite "insider" to the American Establishment, with impeccable credentials and trappings of respectability.

But Carroll Quigley's most notable achievement was the authorship of one of the most important books of the 20th Century: Tragedy and Hope - A History of the World in Our Time.
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130 of 141 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I have read this book three times! It never ceases to surprise me. Quigley traces the evolution of the Establishment in the 20 century via his access to restricted documents in several countries including the USA. He mentions the roles played by foreign policy think-tannks such as the Council on Foreign Relations and the Royal Institute of International Affairs influence in shaping the respective policies of these countries ie:USA and UK and their failures such as the Great Depression, appeasement of Hitler, their successes such as the domination of the executive government of USA, the foundation of the UN by using socialists and communist spies like Alger Hiss - Machiavelli at work- Here, he elaborates that the Elite seeks a Globalist Government divided along regional lines. More over Quigley sees the Elite as a Clear and Present Danger to Americans and the world at large , this propels him to write the book in question. A more systematic reference can also be found by reading the Bertram Gross' Friendly Fascism which corroborates Quigley's view on the Elite's need for a Globalist government via International Institutions and Agencies like UN, IMF, World bank etc.For information is available even as we apeak from THE COMMISSION ON GLOBAL GOVERNANCE at [...] and the growth industry of GLOBALIST ISSUES.Read also in tamden with Foundations:their power and influence by rene wormser and a series of monographs by sociologist G. William Domhoff to further corroborate Quigley's view of the 20th Century. - to the tragedy, we are the hope-
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347 of 386 people found the following review helpful By Michael S. Swisher on May 30, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Tragedy and Hope" is a sprawling history of the world during approximately the period 1890-1960. If one is looking for the details of some half-forgotten international incident during this period, he is likely to find them somewhere in this book. Reading "Tragedy and Hope" is a good refresher course for anyone wishing to understand twentieth-century history, especially the two World Wars, the events leading up to them, and their consequences. Unfortunately the index is sketchy and not always helpful in this process. Furthermore, footnotes and a bibliography are entirely lacking. Although the author, Carroll Quigley, was an eminent academic, this is not an academic textbook, and it is hard to tell just what was its intended audience.
The archetype of "Tragedy and Hope" is the work of Procopius, a courtier in the time of the Byzantine emperor Justinian, whose official history, the " De Aedificiis," celebrated the accomplishments of his monarch - but who supplemented it with a secret history, the "Anecdota," in which he spilled the dirt on the emperor and his wife Theodora. Much of the interest in Quigley's book centers around his dirt-spilling account of the machinations of international bankers and of the organizations they formed to exert influence behind-the-scenes on political and diplomatic activity, such as the Round Table, the Royal Institute of International Affairs and the Council on Foreign Relations. While his discussion of these matters occupies a fairly small number of the book's 1300-odd pages, it has drawn the attention of so-called "conspiracy theorists," mostly on the political right (e.g. the John Birch Society) but also some on the left, such as the sociologist G.
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