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Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective Paperback


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Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective + Family Ministry Field Guide: How Your Church Can Equip Parents to Make Disciples + Perspectives on Family Ministry: Three Views
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Kregel Academic & Professional (August 19, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0825439078
  • ISBN-13: 978-0825439070
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #501,225 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Randy Stinson (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is dean of the School of Church Ministries at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville and serves as president of the Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood.

Timothy Paul Jones (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is professor of leadership and church ministry at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has written a number of books, including Misquoting Truth and Perspectives on Family Ministry.

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Customer Reviews

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See all 11 customer reviews
This is an excellent resource to help those in ministry consider what a true gospel saturated church should look like.
Gkeen1
The second point of the book is a very basic call for any parent of children to be investing in the lives of their children daily.
TylerRSmith
Every church that buys "how-to" books for moving towards family ministry needs to be certain to also purchase this book.
Michael Leake

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sarah J. Bailey on March 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
I have not read this whole book, but it's definitely not because I don't want to, this is a hefty book and it's not one to just read through in a day or two. I'm about half way through and everything has been so good about this book - if you're wanting more information on family ministry whether it's family equipping or family integrated churches, this book will help in understanding how to implement and why parents, and especially dads should be equipped in how to train their children up in God's Word. This book really hits home for me since we're looking for a church that doesn't segregate according to age - I've yet to see in the Bible how age segregation is Biblical and with my children being homeschooled most of the Sunday school curricula are written at a level below that of my children since we integrate God's Word into our school day.

The book is divided into three parts:

The Character of God and the Created Order: A Biblical and Theological Framework for Considering Family Relationships
Covenants and Community: Family Discipleship in Christian History
Growing the Family of God: Guiding a Congregation toward Theologically Grounded Family Ministry

Within each part there are chapters that cover the following, although this is not an exhaustive list by any means:

The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit: The Trinity as Theological Foundation for Family Ministry, Bruce A. Ware
Male and Female, He Created Them: Gender Roles and Relationships in Biblical Perspective, Randy Stinson
Among Your Company at Home: Family Discipleship in the Late Ancient and Medieval Churches, C.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael Leake on March 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is a classic story (that probably has Jewish roots) about a new bride that is cooking her first big dinner for her husband. She decides to go with a recipe that has stood the test of time; a roast that was passed down to her by her mother, who in turn had learned it from her mother. Part of the recipe called for cutting off the ends of the roast. The husband, is astonished by this. He asks, "why in the world do you cut off the ends of the roast? That is the best part!". Her reply is simple, "That's the way my mom always made it".

Later on in the week the new bride decides to question her mom about this practice of lopping off the ends of the roast. The mother's reply is the same as the daughter's, "that was always the way my mom made it". The two curious ladies decide to ask grandma why she cut off the ends of the roast. She says, "I always cut off the ends of the roast because that is the only way that I could get it to fit in the pan".

The point of the story is that generations upon generations can dutifully follow a tradition without even understanding it. What is worse when ripped from its original intention the new generation's following of a practice is not only stupid it is also quite unhelpful and maybe even harmful. What happened with the grandmother and her roast is that she taught the daughter the practice but never explained why she did it. The daughter then was not able to contextualize the recipe for her own setting and so she slavishly followed a tradition and handed an unnecessary "must" down to her own daughter.

What is true of a three generations of ladies cooking a roast is just as true of many churches.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gkeen1 on March 15, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent resource to help those in ministry consider what a true gospel saturated church should look like. It has encourage me even as a lay member of my church to consider my relationships within the church and my home as a place of ministry and gospel witness. Thank you to these authors for the work you have done on behalf of the church to assemble this fantastic resource!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TylerRSmith on April 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
Trained in the Fear of God is a wonderful resource that makes the connection to help shift the ideology from the "programatic-segmented" culture of the church towards the "family-equipped" model of the church. Simply put this book points the church to focus on the hearts of their members instead of the numbers. There were two major points that I thought were very important while reading this book. The first point being a reminder that the church is a body of different members that work as one. The second point being that parents are called to invest in the lives of their children on a daily basis.
The First point from this book provides an instrumental foundation to understanding how the church functions as one body. This does not call the church to be segregated, yet it calls for the church to get involved in each others lives. This looks more like youth sacrificing their Saturdays to serve the elderly or serve the chiildrens ministry on a Sunday night, instead of being cut off from the church forming a "parachurch." This book really places an emphasis on how the church is a body of believers that are from every age,tounge, tribe, and nation focused on Christ and Him alone.
The second point of the book is a very basic call for any parent of children to be investing in the lives of their children daily. This book does a great job of capturing is that training your children is more than plugging them into a ministry at church for a couple of hours a week. The call to raise or train your children is a constant process, whether it be fleshed out through daily scripture readings, worship, and/or prayer parents are called to constantly to be pointing their children to Christ. The book points us to the passage in Deuteronomy 6:1-9 as background for this process.
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