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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for training ideas for the family church
I have not read this whole book, but it's definitely not because I don't want to, this is a hefty book and it's not one to just read through in a day or two. I'm about half way through and everything has been so good about this book - if you're wanting more information on family ministry whether it's family equipping or family integrated churches, this book will help in...
Published on March 14, 2012 by Sarah J. Bailey

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Timely, weighty, helpful for leaders
This book comes at a timely moment for me, as pastor of a church that is concerned about continuing a pattern of godly, biblical training for all ages. For the last 15 years, we've attempted (not without struggles, mind you) to create a more favorable multi-generational approach to Christian Education. We don't want our children to feel isolated. This is the problem that...
Published on March 15, 2012 by Kevin Sorensen


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for training ideas for the family church, March 14, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
I have not read this whole book, but it's definitely not because I don't want to, this is a hefty book and it's not one to just read through in a day or two. I'm about half way through and everything has been so good about this book - if you're wanting more information on family ministry whether it's family equipping or family integrated churches, this book will help in understanding how to implement and why parents, and especially dads should be equipped in how to train their children up in God's Word. This book really hits home for me since we're looking for a church that doesn't segregate according to age - I've yet to see in the Bible how age segregation is Biblical and with my children being homeschooled most of the Sunday school curricula are written at a level below that of my children since we integrate God's Word into our school day.

The book is divided into three parts:

The Character of God and the Created Order: A Biblical and Theological Framework for Considering Family Relationships
Covenants and Community: Family Discipleship in Christian History
Growing the Family of God: Guiding a Congregation toward Theologically Grounded Family Ministry

Within each part there are chapters that cover the following, although this is not an exhaustive list by any means:

The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit: The Trinity as Theological Foundation for Family Ministry, Bruce A. Ware
Male and Female, He Created Them: Gender Roles and Relationships in Biblical Perspective, Randy Stinson
Among Your Company at Home: Family Discipleship in the Late Ancient and Medieval Churches, C. Michael Wren Jr
The Pastor's Home as Paradigm for the Church's Family Ministry, David Prince
Family Ministry, the Priority or a Priority? Lilly Park

If your church is segregated by ages and you or you Pastor is looking for a new direction to make sure that youth are being taught by those who God ordained should be teaching them then this book is a great place to start. By understanding the past and the present as well as each model of a family ministry church, we can begin to have parents taking their God given responsibility and training up children in the home, where ultimately it's supposed to be happening all day, every day and all the time.

**I was provided a copy of this book from Kregel Publications in exchange for my honest review, no other compensation was given.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Must Have for Family Ministers, March 12, 2012
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This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
There is a classic story (that probably has Jewish roots) about a new bride that is cooking her first big dinner for her husband. She decides to go with a recipe that has stood the test of time; a roast that was passed down to her by her mother, who in turn had learned it from her mother. Part of the recipe called for cutting off the ends of the roast. The husband, is astonished by this. He asks, "why in the world do you cut off the ends of the roast? That is the best part!". Her reply is simple, "That's the way my mom always made it".

Later on in the week the new bride decides to question her mom about this practice of lopping off the ends of the roast. The mother's reply is the same as the daughter's, "that was always the way my mom made it". The two curious ladies decide to ask grandma why she cut off the ends of the roast. She says, "I always cut off the ends of the roast because that is the only way that I could get it to fit in the pan".

The point of the story is that generations upon generations can dutifully follow a tradition without even understanding it. What is worse when ripped from its original intention the new generation's following of a practice is not only stupid it is also quite unhelpful and maybe even harmful. What happened with the grandmother and her roast is that she taught the daughter the practice but never explained why she did it. The daughter then was not able to contextualize the recipe for her own setting and so she slavishly followed a tradition and handed an unnecessary "must" down to her own daughter.

What is true of a three generations of ladies cooking a roast is just as true of many churches. There are various practices and strategies that have become a "must" to churches but the historical, theological, and even practical reasons for doing them have not been handed down. As a result of this oversight churches either neglect to key biblical practices (such as parents discipling their children) or they slavishly follow extrabiblical traditions without really knowing the reason why.

Summary

Trained in the Fear of God is a book compiled by Timothy Paul Jones and Randy Stinson that aims at providing these historical, theological, and practical reasons for engaging in family-equipping ministry. Family-equipping ministry is "the process of intentionally and persistently coordinating a congregation's proclamation and practices so that parents are acknowledged, trained, and held accountable as primary disciple-makers in their children's lives". It's not a program to be added to your church but a philosophy of doing family ministry that attaches itself to everything the church does.

This philosophy of ministry is catching on in many churches. It is the philosophy of youth, student, and family ministry at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is quickly spreading to many other institutions. It is filling a void that is left in many other approaches to family ministry. As such many churches are adopting it. With such a spreading one of the dangers is that family-equipping ministry will just become the latest program and two generations from now it will become the next "lopping off the end of the roast" and its theological, historical, and practical foundations will be neglected.

Trained in the Fear of God is divided into three sections: Biblical and Theological Framework, Historical Foundations, and Practice. They are not titled that, but that is essentially the way the book is broken up. There are seventeen different chapters from different contributors (many of them are professors at SBTS). The reader is encouraged to check out the Table of Contents.

The book not only makes a compelling case for the necessity of family ministry it also paints a picture of what family ministry looks like in practice. There are helpful chapters that engage cultural misrepresentations (Al Mohler's chapter on Homosexuality as an example). There are chapters that deal with family ministry in various contexts (Kevin Smiths' chapter on Family Discipleship and the African American Experience). There is even a chapter on the child's brain and how family ministry helps to shape the child's brain. There is much to offer in these pages.

Should You Buy It?

If you are a church leader you should really consider buying this book. I am convinced that Family-Equipping Ministry (whatever it looks like in your particular context) is the way that churches need to minister to families. Every church that buys "how-to" books for moving towards family ministry needs to be certain to also purchase this book. It will build a foundation that will answer the question of "why" for generations to come.

If you are a mom or dad you should also buy this book. It will not only help you to see your valuable role in discipling your children but it will provide helps in doing so. In places where the book itself does not answer the "how-to" questions it will point you to other resources that will.

I highly recommend this book. Also as a little tip I would suggest looking up the Table of Contents and then doing a Google Search for the articles. You might be surprised what you find while you are waiting to purchase the book.

It's a little pricy but worth every penny. Churches need this book as a resource, so do schools, and so do parents.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource, March 15, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
This is an excellent resource to help those in ministry consider what a true gospel saturated church should look like. It has encourage me even as a lay member of my church to consider my relationships within the church and my home as a place of ministry and gospel witness. Thank you to these authors for the work you have done on behalf of the church to assemble this fantastic resource!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Resource, I Encourage Everyone to Read it, April 4, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
Trained in the Fear of God is a wonderful resource that makes the connection to help shift the ideology from the "programatic-segmented" culture of the church towards the "family-equipped" model of the church. Simply put this book points the church to focus on the hearts of their members instead of the numbers. There were two major points that I thought were very important while reading this book. The first point being a reminder that the church is a body of different members that work as one. The second point being that parents are called to invest in the lives of their children on a daily basis.
The First point from this book provides an instrumental foundation to understanding how the church functions as one body. This does not call the church to be segregated, yet it calls for the church to get involved in each others lives. This looks more like youth sacrificing their Saturdays to serve the elderly or serve the chiildrens ministry on a Sunday night, instead of being cut off from the church forming a "parachurch." This book really places an emphasis on how the church is a body of believers that are from every age,tounge, tribe, and nation focused on Christ and Him alone.
The second point of the book is a very basic call for any parent of children to be investing in the lives of their children daily. This book does a great job of capturing is that training your children is more than plugging them into a ministry at church for a couple of hours a week. The call to raise or train your children is a constant process, whether it be fleshed out through daily scripture readings, worship, and/or prayer parents are called to constantly to be pointing their children to Christ. The book points us to the passage in Deuteronomy 6:1-9 as background for this process.
This book was a great resource for anyone in the body. I am thankful for the men and women who contributed to it, and am thankful for the reminder, that it's not about the numbers, yet its about Christ. I hope this review was helpful, and I encourage anyone to read it.
Jesus Changes Everything.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Educational & Informative, March 16, 2012
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Godspoetic1 (Somewhere Over The Rainbow) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
I was delighted to have the chance to read "Trained In the Fear of God", as I am always intersted in books on theology and biblical perpective and History. First off, let me just note that this book is no light-weight, it does contain a little over 300 pages of text for the reader to deeply delve into! And when I say deeply, I do mean deeply! The authors waste no time in setting a historic, biblical background from the get go. So if you can hang on long enough, as some get bored with that, then I do believe you will find a lot of enjoyment out of the rest of the book.

Next, the book is broken into three sections for the reader to teach one how to implement "training up their children/family in the fear of the God", beginning with theological and historical content, then moving on to the more practical approach of theological foundation, in practicing it. My main negative with this book is first, how there was just too much repeating, creating confusion throughout for the reader, and what bothered me more, was how some scripture was taken out of context. As a whole though, the idea and thought behind the book was well-intended, and the book is very meticulously written and organized for the reader.

If you were to consider buying it, I would say go for it, and choose for yourself. I do think it may make for a good study guide for those in ministry mainly. It may not be one of my favorite books, but it is still a pretty decent book as a whole.

FTC Guidelines disclosure, I must state that I was given a copy of the book, "Trained In the Fear of God" from the publisher in exchange for my review. My opinions are expressly my own, and are in no way influenced positively or negatively, due to receiving this book in exchange for the review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Timely, weighty, helpful for leaders, March 15, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
This book comes at a timely moment for me, as pastor of a church that is concerned about continuing a pattern of godly, biblical training for all ages. For the last 15 years, we've attempted (not without struggles, mind you) to create a more favorable multi-generational approach to Christian Education. We don't want our children to feel isolated. This is the problem that so often leads to teens abandoning the church once they've left home--they've never been made to feel like they belong there in the first place. We also want our parents to realize that what we offer at the church is not to be the frontline of discipleship for their children: they are!

Trained in the Fear of God might not be the easiest book to read, at least in the opening portion, as the authors lay out some of the historical background, but if you're willing to dig deep here, it lays a good foundation for where we need to go next. The practical sections will give the most help, but don't neglect the foundational building blocks of the theological reasons "why" we should be involved in family-equipping ministry. If you just jump to the "how to's" you'll simply be adding programs to your church--something you don't need to do.

I would recommend this book to leaders within churches, both vocational and lay leaders. I'm convinced the future demands that we take this approach. I recommend it for parents as well, but my initial thought is they may need encouragement to stick with the reading. It almost comes across as more of an academic, college-class-type of approach and most moms and dads aren't going to tackle something on that level, especially if they're feeling "desperate."
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Helpful Equipping Resource, March 13, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
In nearly ever church I've attended, I have noticed the alarming problem of faith being lost from one generation to the next. Children raised by godly parents seem to have no true concept of faith on their own, missing the relationship that seemed so vibrant in their parents. What could possibly have gone wrong?

The answer is discipleship - or, rather, a lack thereof. Parents often live unaware of the need to disciple their children at home. Instead, they entrust their children to programs of the church. Regardless of the inherent success of those programs, they are only intended to be reinforcements of what is taught on a daily basis in the home. If nothing is taught at home, true discipleship is lacking.

Trained in the Fear of God, edited by Randy Stinson and Timothy Paul Jones, is a collection of thoughts from a variety of authors who are concerned about the lack of family discipleship.

The target audience for Trained in the Fear of God is church leadership. The goal is to educate and equip church leaders with the foundational resources necessary to equip families to disciple in their own homes. But, I can see this book being equally useful in the hands of any church member. One family living out discipleship in their own home could have an incredible impact on other families in the church.

Trained in the Fear of God is divided into three parts.

Part one covers the Biblical and theological framework for in-home discipleship, laying the ground work for why it is essential for parents to train up their own children.
Part two deals with family discipleship in the historical context, moving through church history to show where discipleship has and has not been evident.
Part three gives practical thoughts and suggestions for implementing family discipleship training in the home, including dealing with singles and with children from non-Christian homes.
One important aspect about Trained in the Fear of God is that it is not a step-by-step guide to a new program for the church to implement. While that can be considered a weakness of the book because it can leave a church leader unsure of what steps to take to make changes in his own church, I also see this as the book's greatest strength. The authors are not claiming to have all the answers and the perfect steps to follow to raise godly children. Instead, they acknowledge that every church is different, but the need for family discipleship is a constant that supersedes all other differences.

I see this book as a great resource for motivating the establishment of family discipleship.

This book was sent to me by Kregel Publications in exchange for my honest review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Family Ministry, March 12, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
There are so many books to be read . . . some cover to cover and some browsed as a reference. I found this book difficult to get into initially but when I got over my need to read every word, I was able to appreciate the overview and thoughts presented.

I found the crux of the book to address the much needed topic of getting the family involved in the church community. There are many schools of thoughts on how to reach people and present the gospel to children and adults alike.The initial thought that I found interesting is how much our modern churches focus on separating each individual group. We have "children's ministry" and "Sunday school" and "men's breakfasts" and "ladies bible studies" and "vacation bible studies" and all of these are fantastic and serve their purpose. But how often do we focus on integrating the whole family as one group to teach, grow and involve?

There are so many things we know but don't do on a daily basis. In the home, it's having dinner together and asking each other questions about the day. This can be such an amazing time of fellowship and deep conversation and teaching and laughter. What is the church equivalent of "dinner at the table"? And how as a congregation are we encouraging such growth?

Randy Stinson and Timothy Paul Jones combine thoughts and ideas from many resources and present clear, practical tips and ideas for the church to equip, encourage, and minister to the family.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Building a Family Equipping Ministry, March 12, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
More than a "how to book" on family ministry, Trained in the Fear of God lays a theological foundation for equipping families to do ministry. When I first picked up this book, I was looking for a how to book. I am glad it was so much more.

Part of the so much more are the 1st 2 parts of this book that lay a theological and historical foundation. I appreciated the emphasis on equipping families to pass on their faith in their own homes. The role of the church is to equip parents (particularly fathers in the authors viewpoint) to raise their children to know the Lord.

According to the authors/editors of the book, "the goal of this book is to call congregations to develop a theologically grounded, scripturally compelled perspective on family ministry and then to make Spirit-guided transitions in every ministry to move wisely toward this ministry model."

The theologically grounded aspect and scripturally compelled perspective comes from a Southern Baptist emphasis. The family ministry perspective comes from a family equipping approach instead of a segmented approach that breaks family ministry down to age appropriate or situation appropriate ministry. In Trained in the Fear of God, generations learn together, worship together, and parents are equipped, empowered, and challenged to embrace (especially fathers) the discipleship of children. The Family Equipping Ministry model is defined as "Family equipping churches cultivate a congregational culture that coordinates every ministry to champion the role of parents as primary faith trainers in their children's lives."

I appreciated the editors/authors recognition that more important than family ministry is a living relationship with Jesus Christ. The gospel of Jesus Christ is what changes people, not one's family ministry paradigm.

Flowing out of the gospel is the transformational work of the Scriptures. Households and churches who seek to follow the Biblical principles with certain roles and responsibilities for each member of the family. Each contributor builds upon this idea whether it be gender roles, age roles or the role of the church.

Part 2 of the book looks at the historical development of family ministry in the life of the Christian faith. As a Lutheran I appreciated the emphasis of Luther's contribution to equip fathers to teach their children well.

The perspective for family ministry works well with families that have both parents present, but found it a bit challenging in terms of what to do in cases of widowhood, abandonment or divorce?

I appreciated the multi-generational approach, and completely support that. Yet I have also realized in ministry, that families learn best together, but also with their own age and situation. It's not either/or, it's both/and. Part of that response is addressing a congregation wide multi-generation approach to life.

Part 3 of the book develops a more practical approach built on the theological foundation and historical practice of the 1st 2 parts. Most books begin at part 3. Most pastors simply want to move to the how to (myself included). That's why I appreciated beginning with the why, or perhaps even more importantly what God says in His Word.

Principles were not only laid out in part 3, but how they have been lived out in each author's life. This took the how to's from theory to day to day reality. Even in this section family was affirmed as "a" priority of the church, not "the" priority. "The" priority is a living relationship with Jesus Christ. Gospel empowered families and churches can change their communities and their world.

I give Trained in the Fear of God 4 stars out of 5 stars. It made me think about my own views and practice of family ministry. As editors Randy Stinson and Timothy Paul Jones have brought together numerous authors of the 17 pages who affirm family equipping ministry together, while bringing their own perspective to the discussion.

I recommend Trained in the Fear of God for those who congregational leaders who are looking to equip families to minister to the generations in their own homes, especially in the area of faith development. A church putting together a family ministry team will find each chapter a good launching point for discussing what family ministry not only means, but also what it looks like and even more what God's view of family ministry looks like. The ultimate goal Moses tells us in Deuteronomy is to train our children and ourselves in the fear of God.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Kregel Publications and was not required to give a positive review.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Foundation Setting..., April 4, 2012
This review is from: Trained in the Fear of God: Family Ministry in Theological, Historical, and Practical Perspective (Paperback)
"Trained in the Fear of God" provides deep theological, historical, and practical reflection for the growing family-equipping movement within evangelical churches. Due to the influence of authors such as Steve Wright, Mark DeVries, and Timothy Paul Jones, many pastors and church leaders are beginning to recognize the irreplaceable role of the family in discipleship. Whereas many ministry models seek to bypass the family for the sake of relevance, these authors recognize that God has not given the church that option. Effective and faithful discipleship within the context of the church must partner with families. This much-needed book lays a biblically reflective foundation for this movement.

As with any thematic compilation, the biggest weakness of this book is that it contains quite a bit of overlap. However, if you are unfamiliar with this movement, the repetition serves to help the reader learn what is happening. I found that to be the case as I read the book alongside a young man who was encountering many of these themes for the very first time. We were able to discuss key historical turning points and vital biblical texts on the family early in our conversations in order to build a vocabulary that enabled deeper discussion later on. It's the perfect book for ministers to use in training future church leaders for family ministry.

The book is divided into three sections. Part one provides a biblical and theological framework. Part two explores family discipleship in church history. And Part three gives practical guidance toward implementation of the family-equipping ideas laid out in the first two sections. Some chapters were more helpful than others, but all were valuable in looking at this central biblical theme from many different angles. There is also an indispensable introductory chapter by Bryan Nelson and Timothy Paul Jones that really puts the whole discussion into context: "In God's design, Christian households and churches are not shelters from the conflict; they are gospel-empowered training bases for the conflict...This book has been written with a desire for the development of church ministries that partner with families to train children to enter into battle against the darkness" (14).

Part one includes two chapters which examine family discipleship in the Old Testament as well as in the New Testament. These chapters clearly show that the family is central to God's plan for the world. There are also three chapters of theological reflection on relevant themes. Bruce Ware argues that the Trinity helps us to understand the family. Just as each member of the Godhead "is equal in value and dignity and worth," so is each member of the family. However, each member of the Trinity is also distinct in roles and relationships. The Son submits to the Father, and the Spirit submits to the Father and the Son. Ware points to the nature of the Godhead to help us understand the distinctions in roles and relationships between the members of the family. The main point for today's church is this: Distinction in role and relationship does not imply distinction in value and worth. Or, more specifically, submission does not imply lesser dignity. The Son is not less than the Father because of his submission. Neither is the wife less than the husband. Randy Stinson follows this chapter with further reflection on the distinction between men and women. The church should not seek to blur these distinctions. Instead, the church should celebrate these distinctions as God-designed. Stinson argues that to ignore gender distinctions compromises the authority of Scripture, the health of the family, the health of the church, and the advance of the gospel. Albert Mohler focuses on the controversial topic of homosexuality, arguing that we must trust God's revelation on this topic. For a church to ignore the Bible's teachings on homosexuality is to "reject the authority of Scripture" and to "succumb to cultural pressure and accommodate their understanding...to the spirit of the age" (90).

Part two explores family discipleship throughout church history, and aids in understanding some of the peaks and valleys so that modern readers can learn from past mistakes. Chapter nine is the most helpful chapter in this section and examines how we got where we are now. In this chapter Ryan Steenburg and Timothy Paul Jones show how recent cultural shifts have impacted the church's ministry to families. Cultural movements like the Industrial Revolution and shifting theories of education have impacted the church, at times pulling it away from biblical faithfulness. Modern theories of efficiency have seeped into the church, leading to a greater emphasis on specialists. In many cases these specialized experts have replaced parents, because it's easier to hire an expert than to train parents. Where do we go from here? Part three helps to answer this question.

Part three provides practical guidance for ministers in the field. I found this to be the most helpful section of the book, because the authors are all experienced in seeking to implement this vision within the church and home. This section takes the ideas of the previous sections from theory to real life. David Prince writes a much-needed chapter for pastors. He argues that "no church will effectively establish any form of comprehensive-coordinative family ministry unless the pastor's family models the change that the congregation is seeking" (165). Further, he argues that we often get the relationship between the church and the family backwards. The church doesn't exist to serve the family. Instead, the family exists to serve the church and "to portray to the world...the household of God" (168). Prince does not mince words: "When a pastor organizes his life around golf outings and college sporting events in the name of 'ministry'--all while his wife raises the children--then the men in the church hear the daily 'sermon' delivered with far greater clarity than the one delivered from the pulpit on Sunday" (170). Another very important chapter in this section is Brian Haynes'. Haynes outlines a very practical method for emphasizing the family within the ethos of the church. He points to the practice of celebrating "rites of passage," or points of "spiritual maturity preceded by a period of parental instruction that focuses on specific, age-appropriate biblical truths" (193). He calls these "milestones" and lists seven: parent/baby dedication, salvation and baptism, preparing for adolescence, purity for life, rite of passage to adulthood, high school graduation, and life in Christ. While particular churches may choose to leave off some of these and add others, the practice of celebrating milestones is a creative and powerful way to influence the congregation toward recognition of the family's central role.

"Trained in the Fear of God" is an excellent book that would benefit ministry students, pastors, and families.
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