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The Traitor (Captive Hearts) Mass Market Paperback – August 5, 2014


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Product Details

  • Series: Captive Hearts (Book 2)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks Casablanca (August 5, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402294999
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402294990
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 4.5 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,753 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Picking up where The Captive ended, Burrowes continues her examination of imprisonment and the wounds of war from unexpected and intriguing angles...subtle, cozy, thoughtful, and gently paced, this is a satisfying read that easily handles a difficult character and avoids any whiff of the middle-book blahs. " - Publishers Weekly

"Burrowes continues the Captive Hearts series with an unusual twist: The villain of the previous book is now the hero. It takes a skilled storyteller to turn a ruthless interrogator into a man worthy of readers' respect and adoration. She accomplishes this with compassion, talent, depth of emotion and appealing secondary characters, as well as an unconventional heroine. Burrowes steps outside the box and readers are gifted with a memorable love story." - RT Book Reviews, 4 1/2 stars

"Romances about reformed men, such as Lisa Kleypas' Devil in Winter (2006), are as memorable as they are
enjoyable, and Burrowes' The Traitor is exceptional." - Booklist

About the Author

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Grace Burrowes' bestsellers include The Heir, The Soldier, Lady Maggie's Secret Scandal, Lady Sophie's Christmas Wish and Lady Eve's Indiscretion. The Heir was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2010, The Soldier was a PW Best Spring Romance of 2011, Lady Sophie's Christmas Wish won Best Historical Romance of the Year in 2011 from RT Reviewers' Choice Awards, Lady Louisa's Christmas Knight was a Library Journal Best Book of 2012, and The Bridegroom Wore Plaid was a PW Best Book of 2012. Her Regency romances have received extensive praise, including starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Booklist. Grace is branching out into short stories and Scotland-set Victorian romance with Sourcebooks. She is a practicing family law attorney and lives in rural Maryland.

More About the Author

Grace Burrowes started writing as an antidote to empty nest and soon found it an antidote to life in general. She is the sixth out of seven children, raised in the rural surrounds of central Pennsylvania. Early in life she spent a lot of time reading romance novels and practicing the piano. Her first career was as a technical writer and editor in the Washington, DC, area, a busy job that nonetheless left enough time to read a lot of romance novels.

It also left enough time to grab a law degree through an evening program, produce Beloved Offspring (only one, but she is a lion), and eventually move to the lovely Maryland countryside.

While reading yet still more romance novels, Grace opened her own law practice, acquired a master's degree in Conflict Transformation (she had a teenage daughter by then) and started thinking about writing.... romance novels. This aim was realized when Beloved Offspring struck out into the Big World a few years ago. ("Mom, why doesn't anybody tell you being a grown-up is hard?")

Grace eventually got up the courage to start pitching her manuscripts to agents and editors. The query letter that resulted in "the call" started out: "I am the buffoon in the bar at the RWA retreat who could not keep her heroines straight, could not look you in the eye, and could not stop blushing--and if that doesn't narrow down the possibilities, your job is even harder than I thought." (The dear lady bought the book anyway.)

To contact Grace, email her at graceburrowes@yahoo.com.

Customer Reviews

The love story between Milly and Sebastian is sweet.
M. E. Almaguer
This is the second book in Ms. Burrowes' Captive Hearts Series.
Kathie @First Page to the Last Book Reviews
The story is well written and has mystery and suspense.
bettysunflower

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Penny Black on August 6, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought The Captive (Captive Hearts) was a pretty amazing book, but the Traitor turned out to be even better. Ms. Burrowes created a hero, who found a way to survive, when the odds were against him, and was forced to live with the consequences of his actions, even after the war ended.

Whent the story opens, Sebastian St. Clair, dubbed Traitor Baron, is shunned en masse by the high society and fighting duels with officers, whom he'd interrogated while serving with the French. His life is in a state of limbo: while he doesn't particularly want to live, he doesn't care to die either. With his title going into escheat upon his death, his beloved aunt would be left with little. So, he muddles along, until his aunt hires a new companion.

Milly, a woman of genteel birth, went into service to escape her cruel cousins and their nefarious plans for her future. In St. Clair household, she finds sanctuary, friendship, and ultimately comes into her own as a force to be reckoned with. From their first encounter, it was apparent that Milly and Sebastian were meant for each other: she knew how to respond to his questions and get him to open up to her in return. Their verbal sparring was lively and engaging, and the attraction that built between them didn't outpace the developing friendship.

All the pieces of the story fit together to reveal a greater plot, in which the lines between heroes and traitors were blurred, and impossible choices were made in the name of king and country.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Nora Fan on August 6, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I have enjoyed all of Grace Burrowes' books, and was intrigued with the prospect of making the villain of the first book in this series ("The Captive") the hero of the next one. Sebastian St. Clair, a half-English, half-French heir to an English Barony, was stranded with his mother in France when war broke out. Forced to work for the French military, he became the careful tormentor of many captured English officers during the war. Now that he is back in England in his ancestral seat, he is haunted by his past and hounded by his former victims. Only Millicent Danforth, his Aunt's paid companion, sees him as a man separate from the war.

I thought Burrowes handled this well, making the reader see Sebastian through Milly's eyes, which humanized him and allowed for his back story to be told. I will not retell the plot, as other reviewers have done so quite well. I'll only say this seemed a bit of a departure, hero-wise, for the author, and I think she did an excellent job with it.

As with all her books, I thoroughly enjoyed this.

One complaint: There seems to be a serious lack of editing and proofreading in the book industry these days. I am resigned to e-books that are full of misspellings, grammatical errors, and even missing words and paragraphs,especially those that are self-published where the authors may not have the benefit of professional polishing. However, I expect better -- much better -- from a printed book from a commercial printing house. There were several spots here with continuity errors and mangled names.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. Hoskins on September 16, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sorry to give anything by Grace Burrowes just one star, but this is a terrible book for more than one reason. Though Ms. Burrowes tries valiantly to make Sebastion St. Clair, the hero, a sympathetic and likeable character he remained for me rather unredeemable. And on top of that, the book has several plot holes which are hard to ignore and not only mess up this book, but punch holes into the previous novel, The Captive. And finally, the pace of the book draaagggssss and the stilted dialogue is annoying.

First, the flawed characters, Sebastion and by default, Milly, the heroine who falls in love with him. Sebastion excels at torturing people and while he clearly feels bad about this, it is an unescapable fact that he did indeed torture people over and over again. Yes he didn't kill them, but no doubt he had them wishing he would. Clearly something is broken or damaged inside a person who can inflict unimaginable pain on other human beings over and over for the purpose of breaking their spirit. Personally I'd like a hero that when given the option of brutalizing people or facing death, chooses death over such depravity. Sebastion doesn't and that is something that Ms. Burrowes fails to ever explain away.

Milly, bless her blind little soul, tries futily to explain it all away by pointing out that Sebastion didn't capture the soldiers he later tortured, therefore he can't be held responsible. Much in the same way guards at concentration camps didn't actually capture and transport Jews to the camps, therefore we should hold them blameless for the starvation, torture and pain they inflicted on their prisoners??? It just doesn't fly. She points out repeatedly that the men Sebastion tortured are alive and walking around London now so they should what?? get over it??
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