Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Traitors: The Worst Acts of Treason in American History from Benedict Arnold to Robert Hans Paperback – November 4, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, November 4, 2003
$6.90 $0.01

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Trade (November 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425191850
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425191859
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #792,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

There is nothing remarkable about most traitors, writes Sale, an award-winning reporter on terrorism and counterintelligence for UPI. Their lives are "essentially uneventful, most of them lacking in exotic glamour of any kind"-until they are caught. But, he underscores, they have one thing in common: they are criminals and thus "do not think at all like the rest of us do." Looking at seven traitors, from Benedict Arnold to Whitaker Chambers to Robert Hanssen, he offers brief accounts of their lives, the sequence of "little defections...small dishonesties...disdain for common decency" and other factors that led up to the big defection, whether it was John Wilkes Booth's assassination of President Lincoln or Elizabeth Bentley's spying for the Soviets. The portraits are sharp and place their subjects in historical context. Anyone interested in how traitors are made will find good reading here.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Richard Sale covers terrorism and counterintelligence for UPI, has won the National Press Club Award, and appears frequently on television.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Arnold V. Loveridge on January 29, 2004
Format: Paperback
The biggest frustration I had with this book is that the selection of traitors was simply too small. Sale writes in such wonderful, descriptive detail that you want to know the same sort of information about other traitors in American History. The chapters are mini-biographies that give the reader a wonderful look inside the life and mind of the selected traitors.
I especially liked reading some of the background information about intelligence and "dirty war" tactics during the revolutionary and civil war eras which is not commonly taught in standard high school or college history courses. This book brought those eras into greater focus for me.
Regarding the Walker case, I think most Americans just have no idea how one person can be so destructive. I would have liked to hear that our counter-intelligence community has learned some lessons from that case.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
Mr. Sale's Traitors is a five-star performance of the very first class. He has written mini-biographies of some of America's most notorious scoundrels: Benedict Arnold, John Wilkes Booth, Alger Hiss, John Walker Jr., Robert Hanssen. But it is the way Sale has written about his people that has allowed him to produce such a gem of a book.
Many writers on espionage complacently assume that the subject itself is enough to generate interest. Here Sale appears to assume the opposite. He appears to think that Arnold, Booth, even the Hiss case, have, for most Americans, long ago gone down to utter dust. Sale therefore fashions a narrative with the coloring and dramatic action of fiction that brings his subjects to life under his readers' very eyes.
Sale's ambition seems to be to move the minds of his readers through their feelings. This requires him to be a dramatic artist with an ability to set a scene combined with a deft sense of when to change to a different perspective or approach the story through an additional character. Sale's transitions are excellent and you can tell that he has labored over certain dramatic effects so that their impact on the reader will be fresh, forceful, unimpeded and surprising. Sale succeeds so well that his scenes do move us, and his cameos cut to the quick.
The scope of two of Sale's most important episodes, Whittaker Chambers and John Walker Jr. are amazing. In the first, Sale takes us through the Russian Revolution ("Lenin was a fierce little man with a balding bullet head and neck like a bull") then moves to show how Stalin used terror in the 1936 Spanish Civil War to crush the world's first genuine worker's revolution because it wasn't under Soviet control.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
I heard the author on the radio, and decided to read his book. TRAITORS does a good job describing the most famous traitors in history. Looking at their childhoods (is it surprising that most had not so great family lives growing up?), and also looking at personality traits that can lead to a person becoming a traitor. Good history lesson, with some psychology thrown in.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search