Trampled by Turtles

Wild Animals
by Trampled by Turtles
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Formed: 2003 (11 years ago)


Biography

"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." –Jack London
*****
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that no man steps in the same river twice; that not only is the river different, but so is the man. The members of Trampled By Turtles have experienced much change over the last few years – in addition to exciting advancements in their professional lives, personal changes such as relocation and parenthood have led ... Read more

"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." –Jack London
*****
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that no man steps in the same river twice; that not only is the river different, but so is the man. The members of Trampled By Turtles have experienced much change over the last few years – in addition to exciting advancements in their professional lives, personal changes such as relocation and parenthood have led to reflection on the nature of change and impermanence, both in interpersonal relationships and one’s place in the natural world. On Wild Animals, their eighth album, the band considers both the nature of impermanence, but also what remains constant in the midst of change.

Trampled By Turtles formed in 2003 in Duluth, Minnesota, and have gained in popularity over the years. From their beginnings on the Midwestern festival circuit, they have reached new heights with each album. The release of 2012’s Stars And Satellitessaw the band play to more fans than ever, sell close to 100,000 albums and make their first national television appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman. This year will see the band headline Red Rocks Amphitheater for the first time and the kickoff of their own festival, Festival Palomino, which will take place September 20, 2014 in Minneapolis and will also feature The Head and The Heart, Low, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires and others.
One thing that has not changed: the band is made up of Dave Simonett (guitar/lead vocals), Tim Saxhaug (bass/harmony vocals), Dave Carroll (banjo, harmony vocals), Erik Berry (mandolin) and Ryan Young (fiddle/harmony vocals). Principal songwriter Dave Simonett has been especially affected by change over the last few years. He relocated from his native Duluth to the city of Minneapolis. “When I lived in Duluth, I think I took connection with uncivilized nature for granted. There, I had to drive 20 minutes and I was in the middle of nowhere, and I did this almost daily,” says Simonett. “This was a very important ritual for me. Solitary time in a nearly untouched landscape is my version of church, so I think there is a bit of loss of religion in a lot of my work these days.” This loss of communion with nature is reflected in the title track (“We found everything we need/Buried deep beneath the leaves”) as well as recognition of the fleeting nature of our physical form (“There’s another world/It’s made for us/Trapped in bodies/They’re made to rust”).

Says Simonett, “I've always been a little obsessed with our struggle to stay connected to our simple animal side, the part of our nature that lived off the earth, hunted live game, worshipped trees and mountains. I believe a lot of sadness is caused by feeling disconnected with the rest of nature. A lot of what is instinctual for us is beaten down and frowned upon in modern society. It has to be confusing for the subconscious.”

Another change in Simonett’s life that has had a profound effect is fatherhood. “It changed everything,” he says. “It’s a cliché to say that having a child changes one’s priorities, but it’s the absolute truth.” He has also found the experience to be creatively freeing, something that he didn’t expect: “I worried that a family would have a negative effect on the creative process, thinking that great art came from suffering. I’ve found that it is the removal of the focus from myself that has been a wellspring for my songwriting.” In “Hollow,” his recoiling from the unyielding decay of the natural world and the realization that the natural order is not human-centric (“Little did we know that the world was dying/That the birds outside/They never sang for us”) gives way to a joyous letting go in the face of welcoming his daughter (“But shortly you were here, my little daughter/And now the birds can grow, and the winter doesn’t matter”).

Simonett has come to value his creative process – “I tend to create by letting my subconscious bubble up and only after the songs come to the surface do I try to sort out what it all means,” he says. This semi-ecstatic method of divining songs has been one of the things that the band feels has attracted fans, in that its music that comes from an intuitive place. The band placed themselves in the capable hands of Alan Sparhawk of the band Low and engineer B.J. Burton (Poliça, Megafaun) who crafted a sonic landscape that was spatial and new. Says Berry, “Alan really had us focus on tone,” while Young adds that “Alan had some great ideas on arrangements, and kept us in the right frame of mind to get great takes.” For Carroll, it was a thrill to work with Sparhawk, as he and the rest of the band were fans, but the relationship with Low dates back several years to when Low invited Trampled By Turtles to open their west coast tour.

Says Carroll, “The fact that we respected him, but also were friends, made it a very comfortable experience.” Young gives huge kudos to Burton for his contributions: “He’s the reason that the record sounds as good as it does. He added distortion to the octave viola and delays on the vocals which added incredible atmosphere.” The band’s signature harmonies are intact, although the effects that Burton added created a depth that Saxhaug, the band member who has traditionally done most of the vocal arrangement. The production team pushed the band to consider new ways of approaching harmony, and the result “opened our ears” according to Saxhaug, who added, “I wasn’t sure that recording could feel new after six studio albums, but that went away on the first day. Making this album was the most creative I’ve ever felt in my life.” Sparhawk was moved by the band’s relationship with one another, saying that “there is something generous about the way they play. They make room for each other, they serve the song, yet at times seem to ride the chaotic edge of stringed oblivion. It is the sound of joy; the kind of joy that the truth gives you, even when it's a hard thing to hear.” He had a sense going in that it would be a special album. “I had seen them live multiple times, and I loved the demos. Once they started, they stood in a loose circle, back a little, letting the room fold the sound together, they spun the tornado, calmed the winds and then right back again.” “There has always been an indefinable, special quality about our chemistry,” says Berry. “It’s been a treat to find that more than ten years in we still can turn new corners together in the way we approach a song or a sound, and still with that quality. That something that makes us us.”

Wild Animals is testament from a group of young men, though not quite as young as they once were, growing much more confident in their voice, sonically as well as offering sentient ideas about their place in the world.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." –Jack London
*****
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that no man steps in the same river twice; that not only is the river different, but so is the man. The members of Trampled By Turtles have experienced much change over the last few years – in addition to exciting advancements in their professional lives, personal changes such as relocation and parenthood have led to reflection on the nature of change and impermanence, both in interpersonal relationships and one’s place in the natural world. On Wild Animals, their eighth album, the band considers both the nature of impermanence, but also what remains constant in the midst of change.

Trampled By Turtles formed in 2003 in Duluth, Minnesota, and have gained in popularity over the years. From their beginnings on the Midwestern festival circuit, they have reached new heights with each album. The release of 2012’s Stars And Satellitessaw the band play to more fans than ever, sell close to 100,000 albums and make their first national television appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman. This year will see the band headline Red Rocks Amphitheater for the first time and the kickoff of their own festival, Festival Palomino, which will take place September 20, 2014 in Minneapolis and will also feature The Head and The Heart, Low, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires and others.
One thing that has not changed: the band is made up of Dave Simonett (guitar/lead vocals), Tim Saxhaug (bass/harmony vocals), Dave Carroll (banjo, harmony vocals), Erik Berry (mandolin) and Ryan Young (fiddle/harmony vocals). Principal songwriter Dave Simonett has been especially affected by change over the last few years. He relocated from his native Duluth to the city of Minneapolis. “When I lived in Duluth, I think I took connection with uncivilized nature for granted. There, I had to drive 20 minutes and I was in the middle of nowhere, and I did this almost daily,” says Simonett. “This was a very important ritual for me. Solitary time in a nearly untouched landscape is my version of church, so I think there is a bit of loss of religion in a lot of my work these days.” This loss of communion with nature is reflected in the title track (“We found everything we need/Buried deep beneath the leaves”) as well as recognition of the fleeting nature of our physical form (“There’s another world/It’s made for us/Trapped in bodies/They’re made to rust”).

Says Simonett, “I've always been a little obsessed with our struggle to stay connected to our simple animal side, the part of our nature that lived off the earth, hunted live game, worshipped trees and mountains. I believe a lot of sadness is caused by feeling disconnected with the rest of nature. A lot of what is instinctual for us is beaten down and frowned upon in modern society. It has to be confusing for the subconscious.”

Another change in Simonett’s life that has had a profound effect is fatherhood. “It changed everything,” he says. “It’s a cliché to say that having a child changes one’s priorities, but it’s the absolute truth.” He has also found the experience to be creatively freeing, something that he didn’t expect: “I worried that a family would have a negative effect on the creative process, thinking that great art came from suffering. I’ve found that it is the removal of the focus from myself that has been a wellspring for my songwriting.” In “Hollow,” his recoiling from the unyielding decay of the natural world and the realization that the natural order is not human-centric (“Little did we know that the world was dying/That the birds outside/They never sang for us”) gives way to a joyous letting go in the face of welcoming his daughter (“But shortly you were here, my little daughter/And now the birds can grow, and the winter doesn’t matter”).

Simonett has come to value his creative process – “I tend to create by letting my subconscious bubble up and only after the songs come to the surface do I try to sort out what it all means,” he says. This semi-ecstatic method of divining songs has been one of the things that the band feels has attracted fans, in that its music that comes from an intuitive place. The band placed themselves in the capable hands of Alan Sparhawk of the band Low and engineer B.J. Burton (Poliça, Megafaun) who crafted a sonic landscape that was spatial and new. Says Berry, “Alan really had us focus on tone,” while Young adds that “Alan had some great ideas on arrangements, and kept us in the right frame of mind to get great takes.” For Carroll, it was a thrill to work with Sparhawk, as he and the rest of the band were fans, but the relationship with Low dates back several years to when Low invited Trampled By Turtles to open their west coast tour.

Says Carroll, “The fact that we respected him, but also were friends, made it a very comfortable experience.” Young gives huge kudos to Burton for his contributions: “He’s the reason that the record sounds as good as it does. He added distortion to the octave viola and delays on the vocals which added incredible atmosphere.” The band’s signature harmonies are intact, although the effects that Burton added created a depth that Saxhaug, the band member who has traditionally done most of the vocal arrangement. The production team pushed the band to consider new ways of approaching harmony, and the result “opened our ears” according to Saxhaug, who added, “I wasn’t sure that recording could feel new after six studio albums, but that went away on the first day. Making this album was the most creative I’ve ever felt in my life.” Sparhawk was moved by the band’s relationship with one another, saying that “there is something generous about the way they play. They make room for each other, they serve the song, yet at times seem to ride the chaotic edge of stringed oblivion. It is the sound of joy; the kind of joy that the truth gives you, even when it's a hard thing to hear.” He had a sense going in that it would be a special album. “I had seen them live multiple times, and I loved the demos. Once they started, they stood in a loose circle, back a little, letting the room fold the sound together, they spun the tornado, calmed the winds and then right back again.” “There has always been an indefinable, special quality about our chemistry,” says Berry. “It’s been a treat to find that more than ten years in we still can turn new corners together in the way we approach a song or a sound, and still with that quality. That something that makes us us.”

Wild Animals is testament from a group of young men, though not quite as young as they once were, growing much more confident in their voice, sonically as well as offering sentient ideas about their place in the world.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

"There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive." –Jack London
*****
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that no man steps in the same river twice; that not only is the river different, but so is the man. The members of Trampled By Turtles have experienced much change over the last few years – in addition to exciting advancements in their professional lives, personal changes such as relocation and parenthood have led to reflection on the nature of change and impermanence, both in interpersonal relationships and one’s place in the natural world. On Wild Animals, their eighth album, the band considers both the nature of impermanence, but also what remains constant in the midst of change.

Trampled By Turtles formed in 2003 in Duluth, Minnesota, and have gained in popularity over the years. From their beginnings on the Midwestern festival circuit, they have reached new heights with each album. The release of 2012’s Stars And Satellitessaw the band play to more fans than ever, sell close to 100,000 albums and make their first national television appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman. This year will see the band headline Red Rocks Amphitheater for the first time and the kickoff of their own festival, Festival Palomino, which will take place September 20, 2014 in Minneapolis and will also feature The Head and The Heart, Low, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires and others.
One thing that has not changed: the band is made up of Dave Simonett (guitar/lead vocals), Tim Saxhaug (bass/harmony vocals), Dave Carroll (banjo, harmony vocals), Erik Berry (mandolin) and Ryan Young (fiddle/harmony vocals). Principal songwriter Dave Simonett has been especially affected by change over the last few years. He relocated from his native Duluth to the city of Minneapolis. “When I lived in Duluth, I think I took connection with uncivilized nature for granted. There, I had to drive 20 minutes and I was in the middle of nowhere, and I did this almost daily,” says Simonett. “This was a very important ritual for me. Solitary time in a nearly untouched landscape is my version of church, so I think there is a bit of loss of religion in a lot of my work these days.” This loss of communion with nature is reflected in the title track (“We found everything we need/Buried deep beneath the leaves”) as well as recognition of the fleeting nature of our physical form (“There’s another world/It’s made for us/Trapped in bodies/They’re made to rust”).

Says Simonett, “I've always been a little obsessed with our struggle to stay connected to our simple animal side, the part of our nature that lived off the earth, hunted live game, worshipped trees and mountains. I believe a lot of sadness is caused by feeling disconnected with the rest of nature. A lot of what is instinctual for us is beaten down and frowned upon in modern society. It has to be confusing for the subconscious.”

Another change in Simonett’s life that has had a profound effect is fatherhood. “It changed everything,” he says. “It’s a cliché to say that having a child changes one’s priorities, but it’s the absolute truth.” He has also found the experience to be creatively freeing, something that he didn’t expect: “I worried that a family would have a negative effect on the creative process, thinking that great art came from suffering. I’ve found that it is the removal of the focus from myself that has been a wellspring for my songwriting.” In “Hollow,” his recoiling from the unyielding decay of the natural world and the realization that the natural order is not human-centric (“Little did we know that the world was dying/That the birds outside/They never sang for us”) gives way to a joyous letting go in the face of welcoming his daughter (“But shortly you were here, my little daughter/And now the birds can grow, and the winter doesn’t matter”).

Simonett has come to value his creative process – “I tend to create by letting my subconscious bubble up and only after the songs come to the surface do I try to sort out what it all means,” he says. This semi-ecstatic method of divining songs has been one of the things that the band feels has attracted fans, in that its music that comes from an intuitive place. The band placed themselves in the capable hands of Alan Sparhawk of the band Low and engineer B.J. Burton (Poliça, Megafaun) who crafted a sonic landscape that was spatial and new. Says Berry, “Alan really had us focus on tone,” while Young adds that “Alan had some great ideas on arrangements, and kept us in the right frame of mind to get great takes.” For Carroll, it was a thrill to work with Sparhawk, as he and the rest of the band were fans, but the relationship with Low dates back several years to when Low invited Trampled By Turtles to open their west coast tour.

Says Carroll, “The fact that we respected him, but also were friends, made it a very comfortable experience.” Young gives huge kudos to Burton for his contributions: “He’s the reason that the record sounds as good as it does. He added distortion to the octave viola and delays on the vocals which added incredible atmosphere.” The band’s signature harmonies are intact, although the effects that Burton added created a depth that Saxhaug, the band member who has traditionally done most of the vocal arrangement. The production team pushed the band to consider new ways of approaching harmony, and the result “opened our ears” according to Saxhaug, who added, “I wasn’t sure that recording could feel new after six studio albums, but that went away on the first day. Making this album was the most creative I’ve ever felt in my life.” Sparhawk was moved by the band’s relationship with one another, saying that “there is something generous about the way they play. They make room for each other, they serve the song, yet at times seem to ride the chaotic edge of stringed oblivion. It is the sound of joy; the kind of joy that the truth gives you, even when it's a hard thing to hear.” He had a sense going in that it would be a special album. “I had seen them live multiple times, and I loved the demos. Once they started, they stood in a loose circle, back a little, letting the room fold the sound together, they spun the tornado, calmed the winds and then right back again.” “There has always been an indefinable, special quality about our chemistry,” says Berry. “It’s been a treat to find that more than ten years in we still can turn new corners together in the way we approach a song or a sound, and still with that quality. That something that makes us us.”

Wild Animals is testament from a group of young men, though not quite as young as they once were, growing much more confident in their voice, sonically as well as offering sentient ideas about their place in the world.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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