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Transact-SQL Programming: Covers Microsoft SQL Server 6.5 /7.0 and Sybase Adaptive Server 11.5 Paperback – April 8, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 840 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; First edition (April 8, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565924010
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565924017
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,675,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kevin Kline is the Technical Strategy Manager for SQL Server Solutions at Quest Software, a leading provider of award winning tools for database management and application monitoring tools. Kevin is also a founding board member and former President of the international Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS) and frequently contributes to database technology magazines, web sites, and discussion forums. Kevin's most popular book is SQL in a Nutshell published by O'Reilly Media. Kevin is also the author of monthly magazine columns for SQL Server Magazine and Database Trends & Applications. Kevin is a top rated speaker, appearing at international conferences like Microsoft TechEd, DevTeach, PASS, Microsoft IT Forum, and SQL Connections.

Lee Gould is a principal consultant with Sybase Professional Services in New York where she works mainly in the financial services industry on Wall Street. She has been working with SQL Server since 1992 and has been involved in the computer industry for over ten years. She has published numerous articles in Microsoft SQL Server Professional (Pinnacle Publishing) and presented on a variety of topics at the International Sybase User Group and Powersoft conferences. Lee was born in Liverpool, England. She grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa, where she attended the University of Witwatersrand and received her bachelors of commerce in business information systems. Lee immigrated to America four years ago and is currently pursuing an MBA at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. Lee lives in the suburb of North Brunswick, New Jersey, with her two cats, Lady and Paganini. She can often be seen running, cycling, swimming, and horseriding while she trains for marathons and ultra triathlon events. When not immersed in sport, Lee is an avid fan of classical music, good wine, the piano, science fiction and Terminator II. Her motto on life is "carpe diem," which she endeavors to follow regardless of where it leads her. Lee can be contacted at lee_k_gould@yahoo.com.

Andrew Zanevsky, an independent consultant and founder and president of AZ Databases, Inc., has been working with SQL Server since 1992. He writes a monthly column "Super Administrator," for Microsoft SQL Server Professional (Pinnacle Publishing) and has published more than a hundred technical articles throughout his career. He immigrated to the United States from Minsk, Belarus in 1991. He started programming in 1982 and holds a degree from the Belarus State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (equivalent to an M.S. in computer science). Andrew lives in a suburb of Chicago with his wife Katrin, son Anthony, and stepdaughter Esther. Katrin is also a SQL Server consultant. They work on some projects together and can talk about Transact-SQL at dinner. Andrew's daughter Nikkie lives in New York, wants to be a writer, and has won numerous awards in art contests. Andrew was the president of the Great Lakes SQL Server Users Group in Chicago from 1994 through 1997. He can be reached at zanevsky@azdatabases.com.


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Customer Reviews

I give it 2 stars for being so out of date.
Sam Johnson
This book doesn't even cover SQL Server 7.0, let alone 2000.
Jerry T.
Likewise one would be foolish to buy and read this book.
Kindle Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Tsai on February 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
You'd think this book covers SQL Server 6.5, 7.0 and Sybase SQL Server that this is going to be patchy here and there, trying to cover one product here and another product there. You'd think SQL Server 7.0 is so much more advanced than SQL Server 6.5 that this book has to make so many compromises that it's only half good for either. And you'd probably think that this book has so few pages, this must only be an intro.
Not so on all three accounts. This book is to-the-point Transact-SQL. There's no filler material here. I've programmed in Transact-SQL for quite awhile, and the examples, along with the descriptions, help me produce clean code. SQL Server is sensitive to how code and indexes interact. The author stresses the synergistic design of indexes and code.
Here is what you do have to watch out for if you're considering this book:
*This book is clearly a T-SQL only book. For example, it does not dwell on the exact page size; 6.5 uses 2k pages, while 7.0 uses 8k pages. You must be aware of this when you code and design indexes. This book covers the concepts very well, but it is up to you to apply the concepts to your design.
*Certain exciting additions such as Linked Servers are not discussed. The book is a bit backwards on the inter-operability of SQL Server, since Linked Server offers remote queries in addition to the functionality of Remote Servers (Linked Server is not available in 6.5).
*Replication is also not discussed. SQL Server 7.0 has greatly improved on the replication capabilities over 6.5, both in ease and reliability. In all fairness, replication is an enterprise architecture issue more than a coding issue.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
I liked this book, but SQL 7.0 is covered in an appendix. Moreover, many of the techniques shown are archaic and have been deprecated by Microsoft, even for SQL 6.5. For example, joins are often show using the old join syntax. I wouldn't have such a problem with this if this book didn't advertise itself as a SQL 7.0 book. It's definitely not a 7.0 book and if you buy it expecting that, you'll be disappointed. Another problem with the book is its failure to adequately distinguish between Sybase and Microsoft syntax. There are some important differences, as the products have diverged more with each new release. Some of the examples show code that works on Sybase, but not on Microsoft (or vice versa), without telling the reader. The book would have been better off focusing on one or the other.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Morris on October 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
T-SQL hasn't changed so much in 7.0 that its users cannot get a lot of useful information out of this book. For 6.5 DBA's, it is a *MUST* have book, no matter what your skill level.
Don't let the people who whine about it being focussed more on 6.5 than 7.0 scare you away. These people are obviously not managing real database installations because most of the professional DBA's I know (me included) are still managing 6.5 servers and will be throughout most of next year.
Buy this book if you want to be a DBA worth your paycheck.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jim Burns on April 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I remember SQL Server 4.2 and 6.5 well enough to know that this was a good book in its time. Problem is, 7.0 has been out for over a year and SQL 2000 is on the horizon. This book is woefully out of date. It queries system tables (in the first place, you shouldn't do that unless absolutely necessary) that don't even exist anymore (e.g., sysprocedures). It uses old-style joins throughout, despite the fact that they've been deprecated by Microsoft, Soukup&Delaney, Henderson, and many others. Last but not least, it *claims* 7.0 coverage, but does not deliver. A perfunctory appendix on 7.0 does not constitute SQL Server 7.0 coverage.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By boneheadIII (boneheadiii@media-net.net) on October 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
There aren't a lot of Transact-SQL books on the market, and when I saw that O'Reilly had one I had to have it. Whether you use SQL every day or just want to start learning... This is the perfect book. From the basics, to an in-depth understanding of the subject, this book acomplishes it all. Transact-SQL in a Nutshell is by far, the best 35 bucks I've ever spent. I use SQL every day, and this book has improved my developement time and quality by leaps and bounds. This one should actually get an extra star.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Witecki on November 26, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an outstanding book on writing Transact SQL. The changes brought by SQL Server 7.0 have little impact on the value this book provides to programmers that are new to T-SQL. The book is focused on writing better code, database design, and optimization. If you are looking for a book on SQL Server, this is not for you. If you are looking for an introductory level book, this book is not for you.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
Transact-SQL Programming, by Kevin Kline, et al., is a very good SQL book, and an excellent Transact-SQL book. It covers Microsoft SQL Server 6.5/7.0 and Sybase Adaptive Server 11.5. (The changes in Transact-SQL from SQL Server 6.5 to 7.0 , by the way, are really not significant.)
This book is strongly oriented towards database programming, not administration. It's not for beginners. It's not a setup and configuration guide, nor is it a "cool features" book. And it's definitely not about how to hook up Visual Basic to SQL Server and call it database programming.
In order to get much from this book, the reader should be able to perform basic queries, inserts, updates and deletes using SQL. However, while some familiarity with SQL is presumed, the book has several chapters on "standard" SQL that is some of the best I've ever read for novice to intermediate SQL programming. (If you're entirely new to SQL programming get Joe Celko's Instant SQL book, or something like it.)
There are a few glaring typos throughout the book. I didn't perceive them to be any more frequent than in most recent computer books. Personally, I'd rather have the information in the book available a couple of weeks earlier than to wait for another proofread to shake out a couple of dozen typos. And furthermore, if the typos, in this book at least, are really throwing you, it's because you aren't understanding the material. Go back and re-read more carefully.
Once again, this is a Transact-SQL programming book. It is not a Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 book. If you don't understand the difference, you're probably not ready for this book. But if you want to learn how to use Transact-SQL to write professional, commercial database applications for either SQL Server 6.5/7.0 or Sybase Adaptive Server, this book provides everything you need to know.
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