Transculturalism: How the World Is Coming Together

5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1576872185
ISBN-10: 1576872181
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Claude Grunitzky, the Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of TRACE magazine, has unparalleled experience in pubishing a magazine and creating youth-oriented marketing programs on both sides of the Atlantic. TRACE magazine, based in New York City and printed in Italy, relies on satellite offices in London and Paris, as well as on a global network of first-rate writers and photographers for the production of a universally praised bimonthly lifestyle magazine which has become the hip cosmopolitan reader's bible of new ideas. TRACE fuses aggressive reporting, arresting visuals, and savvy promotion to support an editorial vision that is unafraid to question the most trendy breakthroughs in global youth culture. Last year, Grunitzky and his business partners completed a multimillion dollar financing led by the Goldman Sachs Group. As a result, the TRACE brand is now being leveraged globally across various magazine and television platforms, with various editions of TRACE around the world. In April 2002, Grunitzky and business partner Richard Wayner launched TRUE Agency, a specialized advertising and marketing shop partnered with Omnicom's TBWA\Chiat\Day, which became the African-American agency of record for Nissan in July 2002, with 2003 billings estimated at more than $22 million.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: True Agency (January 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1576872181
  • ISBN-13: 978-1576872185
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #311,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Debbie Rigaud began her writing career covering news and entertainment for magazines--namely, Seventeen, Twist and CosmoGIRL!. She's interviewed celebs, politicians and other social figures, but enjoyed interviewing "real" girls the most. Manhattan-born and Jersey-bred, Debbie now lives in Bermuda with her husband.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Pitts on June 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
I imagine this was quite a 'trendy' book to own when it came out in 2003. On retrospect though, it doesn't seem a particularly relevant text to own in the 2010's.

Some of the foresights on who are going to be tomorrow's multicultural 'stars' were wrong, the movers and shakers they claimed to be taking over in the world of the arts still largely unknown and some of the features just, well, desperate. There are 'cutting edge' pieces on 'new' subcultures like 'The Aggressives' (Aka Lesbians) and 'Transmen' (Transexuals) as well as 'Space Invaders' (Graffiti artists) and at times it can be cringeworthy in its self indulgence, culminating in an hilariously egoic, insecure piece a director (Michael Power anybody!?) did about himself, encouraging friends to say what they loved and hated about him. There are some interesting moments; most of Claude Grunitzky's articles hold weight, especially the piece about French Hip Hop. Journalist Sara Elise Patterson provides a nice travelogue and Alex Sharkey's 'What is Cool?' is fun. The problem is that the book is SO trendy, it probably only REALLY mattered for the few months after it was published. 2000 and late one might say.

Where the book does succeed though is in looking at where the world was in 2003 and is interesting in that, you can see traces (no pun intended) of how we got to where we are now. It's also quite amusing to see how fleeting the world of the fashionista is. Some of the subjects/writers believe in their trends SO much, but with the advantage of being able to look back, the style over substance approach is almost painfully evident.

Overall a pretty unique, interesting read, but (I imagine...) not the way they intended it to be

J Pitts
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Minott on September 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When this book first came out many of the ideas it represented were part of the verge culture that only Tastemakers and Fashionista in major cities were aware of. However, currently most of the content in this tome is outdated. The further we get from 2004 the more apparent that will become.

Yet this book is still enjoyable if read for mostly entertainment purposes and not strictly as a cultural guide. It is still interesting to see so many emerging ideas of "cool" from around globe even if they were never actually considered "cool" by the masses.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. Ita on August 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
How provocative, challenging and even optimistic is this anthology of essays, edited by the insightful Claude Grunitzky, you may ask? Very much so on all counts. The writers are well aware of the capability of thinking, visionary individualists to transform and improve an advanced capitalist consumer society that is within a century of decline due to the depletion of resources, overpopulation and incresing intolerance (including that of one "reviewer" below, Matt, who clearly has not read this anthology). The fusion of cultures is inevitable in a society with instantaneous communications capability, from the McCluhanesque "cold" medium of television to "hot" radio and interactive Internet media. The book amkes no claim that other cultures ghave "equal" voice with or within western imperialism, but that such a voice is subject to the cultural transformation. The book would indeed be offensive if Matt's allegations were true -- but they aren't. Get it. Read it. Judge for yourself. I do not agree with every assertion in the book -- but found it a terrific catalyst for thought and ideas. Get it. Read it. Enjoy!
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By curious georgia on March 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
i LOVE this book! "transculturalism" says everything that needs to be said about now the world's citizens need to communicate with each other, and every page is CAPTIVATING. the illustrations are great, too. i want to know all the people in this book! my name is "curious georgia."
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Matt W. on April 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
How terribly self-congratulatory this book is. All the people in it conveniently seem to forget that the live within the confines of an advanced capitalist consumer society. The idea that other cultures have an equal voice with western imperialism is ridiculous. The book would be more offensive if it weren't so ignorant. It's We Are The World for the ipod set.
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