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Transformers: Exodus: The Official History of the War for Cybertron Mass Market Paperback – June 28, 2011


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Transformers: Exodus: The Official History of the War for Cybertron + Transformers: Exiles + Transformers: Retribution
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (June 28, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345522524
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345522528
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,826 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Transformers: Exodus is precisely the origin story that the franchise needed. It’s entertaining, filled with the sort of epic battles Transformers lend themselves to, and keeps readers breathless with anticipation even though we already know how it ends. Megatronus was a gladiator until he got his name and started thinking about the way Cybertron’s caste system diminished the bots’ potential. Orion Pax was a data worker—a librarian, really—under the master archivist. The archivist is more than he seems, and provides a great deal of context for the history of Cybertron, and a few key deus ex machina twists. Orion Pax, now known as Optimus Prime, is an honest character, who never asks for the greatness that is forced upon him; Megatron, on the other hand, is an egomaniacal tyrant. But in the framework of a political revolution and the civil war that overthrows a system that had practically calcified, there are terrible fights, friendships made and broken, and the beginnings of a genuine epic; above all, it’s fun to read. --Regina Schroeder --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Transformers: Exodus is precisely the origin story that the franchise needed. It’s entertaining, filled with
the sort of epic battles Transformers lend themselves to, and keeps the reader breathless with anticipation
even though we already know how it ends.  [I]n the framework of a political revolution and
the civil war that overthrows a system that had practically calcified, there are terrible fights, friendships
made and broken, and the beginnings of a genuine epic; above all, it’s fun to read.  —Booklist

More About the Author

Alex Irvine has written more than thirty books, both his own original fiction (Buyout, The Narrows, Mystery Hill, A Scattering of Jades) and licensed work for Marvel, Hasbro, Warner Brothers, Fox, Blizzard, Legendary, and other international entertainment companies. He has also written comics (Daredevil Noir, Iron Man: Rapture, Hellstorm, Son of Satan: Equinox), games, and animation. The three games he's currently writing -- Marvel Avengers Alliance, Marvel War of Heroes, and Marvel PuzzleQuest -- together have totaled more than 75 million players. Before leaving to write full time, he spent six years as an English professor at the University of Maine. A native of Ypsilanti, Michigan, he lives in South Portland, Maine, with his wife and three children...and two dogs, a bird, a snake and a fish. You can find him on Twitter or Facebook.

Favorite writers, in no particular order: Cervantes, Borges, Murakami, Dick, Pynchon, Herriman, Chaucer, Kelly. Ask me again tomorrow, the list would be slightly different.

Some favorite books, not written by people on the previous list (but all written by people who might have been on the list on a different day), and again in no particular order: Sarah Canary, Gould's Book of Fish, Geek Love, Midnight's Children, Song of Solomon...

More at Twitter (@alexirvine) and Facebook.

Customer Reviews

It's really that bad.
H. Tague
If you want a gripping, exciting origin story on Optimus and Megatron this book is for you.
V. Edwards
As noted by other readers, errors and contradictions can be found throughout the book.
DreamPen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Steven Croy on July 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was excited when I first picked this book up over the weekend. I love origin stories, and was interested how this one would tie in with the various continuities.

What I ended up reading was only a few steps away from being a jumbled mess.

Here are my main complaints:
1.) There is no sense of when events occur in relation to each other, other than that events in later chapters occur after those that occur in earlier chapters (for the most part). It was annoying trying to figure out if eons had passed or just days (or if events are occurring at the same time).
2.) The number of references to different continuities can get annoying. "Project Generation One"? Really? It felt like all the continuities got mixed up in a stew, but not everything mixed together properly.
3.) Did X transformer really just get thrown in for a random 1 paragraph mention? Why? How does this advance the plot? Does it reveal any new character motivations? Or is it just fanboy service?
4.) Alpha Trion's role as Yoda seemed ill-conceived. If he really was one of the 13 primes, shouldn't he have known all about Omega Supreme and how to activate him? Why didn't he reveal all about the Matrix, Vector Sigma, et al to Optimus in order to assist in the war? He seems eternally shackled to a caste that he was forced into by Sentinel Prime (who was the best character by far... actual character development!!! Shocker!).
5.) There's little indication after the early part of the book which character is being focused on. The points of view seem to jump around quite a bit, to the point where you're like "Megatron sounds like a good guy!" "Oh, wait, maybe that's Optimus...
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30 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Seven Kitties on July 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I'll start with the positives about this book:

1. It was not written by Alan Dean Foster.
2. It was not written by Simon Furman.
3. There are NO humans at all in this book. (Yes, Hasbro, it's true: we want *robots* in our robot stories, fancy that!)

That's....uhhhh, about it.

Problems with this book, in random order--I am keeping anything potentially spoilery to within the first 50 or so pages:

1. Editing is non-existent. The prose was flabby and there's no real sense of conflict or scene. Scenes will 'happen', set off with hard-hiatuses, but will have no conflict or resolution in them. Things are repeatedly restated, taking up pagespace and time that might have better gone to setting, characterization and plot development.

2. Pacing is s-l-o-w. It's a bit over 250 pages but it seems to last forever (not helped, of course, by the flabby prose).

3. A lot of the characterization makes no sense. Alpha Trion is some spooky dude who keeps the entire history of Cybertron. We're told he can't read the future clearly, only glimpses. Yet he's...regularly befuddled by actions that have already happened--that should, technically, be in his little magic book. Orion's emotional shifts are laughably volatile--he's suspicious, but then he's chumming it up. And in a 'canon' that says (*several times*) that new mechs sort of wash up by the Well, why does Megatron keep calling Orion 'brother'? What does that even mean in this? (Worldbuilding fail!) Megatron, who is allegedly uneducated, is a rhetorical genius with an extensive vocabulary. Orion is a lowly clerk who gets away with internal sabotage without even getting punished by his boss, much less having, oh, like an internal qualm? And for those who love Optimus?
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23 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Ozphoenix on June 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I wouldn't say Alex Irvine is a bad writer - he certainly knows how to write and construct a plot - but why oh why is there never any passion, emotion or even the vaguest description for anything ever included in mainstream Transformers novels? Is it because 'Hey, they're robots'?

SPOILERS AHEAD! Stop reading now if you don't want to know!

I found the story to be so cold, sterile and emotionless that I was struggling to keep reading. There is no description or sense of how big powerful and awesome Optimus Prime is. Megatron fares a little better in that respect, since he comes across as the fearsome and mighty gladiator that he starts the novel as. The characters speak in short clipped sentences like a learn to read novel for children, with the occassional reference to someone speaking 'quietly' or 'in anger'.

When Orion Pax goes from being a lowly clerk/librarian to becoming Optimus Prime, it is in name only. This is at odds with what happens in the cartoon series or anywhere else in the various TF universes. He's never described in terms of his huge size, body, shape, colour or anything else as changing. But then in this book, there was no description of what he looked like as Orion Pax to start with. That right there is a brilliant example of what is wrong with this book.

The whole way through the story the characters come and go and we're never told what they look like. They pop up, say something, and they come back again - or not. Because the Transformers are on Cybertron, they definitely do NOT look like what we know they are on Earth with their colours and alt modes. For lack of anything else for my imagination and brain to go by, by default I was picturing all the bots in their Earth forms.
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