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Transforming Health Care: The Financial Impact of Technology, Electronic Tools and Data Mining


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ISBN-10: 1118420349
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118420348
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Edward C Chung on April 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I started developing healthcare IT products and services back in 2006 when I co-founded a healthcare IT startup. Back then, there were lots of uncertainties regarding healthcare reform (still is today). I wished there was a visionary book like Transforming Health Care by Phil Fasano; who provided a strategic roadmap on IT innovation that is rapidly transforming the antiquated America's health care system today. The stories Phil told are supported by facts and practical case studies. The passionate story-telling style makes the book welcoming to read. I find this book especially useful for innovators, technologists and entrepreneurs who want a holistic view of what and how information technology can be applied to transform healthcare. With his financial background, Phil's discussion on healthcare financial exchange (HFE) is especially insightful. The book includes a broad spectrum of topics covering, personalized healthcare, mobile health, preventive (even predictive) medicine, and the financial impact on a reformed healthcare system that puts the patient in the center of it all. You should read this book if you are looking for product or service ideas in capturing opportunities within the healthcare IT ecosystem.

This is however not a book on technical implementation or healthcare IT (HIT) standards relating to EMR, EHR, HIE, data mining, or HFE. If you are looking for more technical implementation details, or want to research on HIT standards, you may what to check out additional resources from HIMSS.org, AHIMA.org, and PHDSC.org.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dermdoc on June 9, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My generation believes in technology. We believe it will improve physicians' lives, advance patient care, and reduce costs. Like Iron Man, there is no limit to what we can do when we put the suit of information technology (IT) on the body of medicine. Yet, despite the obvious impact of IT on our lives, we've yet to see it revolutionize medicine. We need someone to report on the condition of digital health and to articulate the opportunities and outline the strategy for healthcare transformation. Phil Fasano delivers that digital health State of the Union address in this book.

Fasano is the CIO of Kaiser Permanente (KP), the integrated health care system where I work. He directs our impressive 6,000 member health IT team and has led us to the forefront of health information technology (HIT) in care delivery.

In the book, Fasano briefly covers the history of HIT with an emphasis on electronic health records (EHRs). He recounts KP's experience in rolling out the world's largest private EHR system and shares successes such as our computer care registry that has reduced deaths by heart disease by 73% in our members. He goes on to cover the basics of mobile, virtual, and analytics along the way highlighting bright spots in KP and in other systems on the HIT leaderboard, including The Cleveland Clinic and Intermountain Healthcare.

In the chapter "Investing in Healthcare IT Innovations," Fasano picks his winners in HIT investments including cloud computing (it could cut costs by 30-40%). He sees health information exchanges (HIE) as a business opportunity for entrepreneurs and uses the salient example of Lee Moffitt Cancer Center as a winner in the analytics model -- They are tracking cancer patients' data with the aim of designing targeted treatments.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Russ Emrick VINE VOICE on April 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the best books I've read in the Healthcare space. Written by a well respected executive (Mr. Fasano) in one of the leading Healthcare systems of the US (Kaiser Permanente) "Transforming Health Care" is a must read by anyone involved in medicine: practitioners, suppliers, legislators.

The cost curve must must be changed. Access and reform are useless if the entire system collapses under its own weight or becomes unaffordable. "Transforming Health Care" is an invaluable guide for using analytics and technology to reduce health care costs. It is centered around several specific themes:

1. The imperative for secure systems that respect and protect the privacy and confidentiality of our health information.
2. The criticality of coordinated systems to drive down costs while improving health.
3. The need to understand the business case for healthcare IT.
4. The transformative power of technology to make health care easier, more convenient, and more personal for everyone who encounters it.

The book "Overtreated" proves the case that 30% or more of health care is unnecessary or wasted. Unfortunately there really hasn't been a solution. "Transforming Health Care" has one: the use of analytics to find out what works and reduce variance. "Transforming Health Care" offers a guide on how technology can reduce costs while improving both patient satisfaction and health - the Triple Aim or reform. A must read for those of us in healthcare and want to be part of effective reform.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on December 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The average paper medical record weighs 1.5 pounds, yet is likely missing key data and, in some places, illegible. An analysis of 1,628 medical records published in the British Medical Journal found that 40% omitted an important diagnosis, 30% didn't list the names of drugs prescribed, and most left out patients' occupations, marital status, and even their ages. Illegible handwriting was found in 16% of the charts in another study, and in doctors' offices and hospitals, up to 30% of files can't be found at all when they're needed - leading to repeated tests, treatment delays, and decisions made without all the facts. Worse yet, Hurricane Katrina destroyed an estimated 1 million charts in New Orleans, while more survived but were inaccessible to the city's million-plus displaced residents.

Though the U.S. leads the world in healthcare expenditures, we ranked last in one study of medical outcomes among the world's most highly developed countries. Digitizing healthcare can change that - improving not only current practice but serving as an invaluable source of research for future improvements. Fortunately, thanks to the federal government's carrot and stick approach, the number of users is growing rapidly, with large practices and younger physicians in the lead. Unfortunately, only a handful can share information outside their own systems - integrating with laboratory or pharmacy systems. Geographic integration is another problem, though improvements are in motion (Health Information Exchanges - HIEs).

The 'bad news' - author Fasano does not provide cost/benefit data for this new technology.
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