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Transmetropolitan VOL 02: Lust for Life Paperback – February 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Series: Transmetropolitan (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (February 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563894815
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563894817
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.5 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #909,102 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Explosive storytelling and provocative politics." - Entertainment Weekly "Ellis both subverts and elevates." - Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer) "Beautifully angry stuff." - Metal Hammer "Truly disturbing social horror." - Borderline" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Warren Ellis has created and written for The Authority, Transmetropolitan, Orbiter, the award-winning Planetary, and the forthcoming Ministry of Space. Darick Robertson is the artist and co-creator of Transmetropolitan. He is also the artist on The Boys and Fury, and creator of Space Beaver. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

This book extremely well written and is all about a good story.
Joseph Dewey
It has some nice establishing moments, and sets up some characters that will play critical roles through out the series.
Michael Schwarz
If you've never read "Transmetropolitan" go back and read the first book then dive headfirst into this second one.
Sam Quixote

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Erik Swedlund on October 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
The first book in the collected Transmetropolitan comics, Back on the Street, covers the first three issues. This, the second book, covers issues 4-12. While the first is pounding with intensity, here Spider Jerusalem settles into his setting and is put through his paces. Having gotten Spider out of his mountain retreat and back to reporting, it seems writer Warren Ellis started casting about to find something for Spider to do. A few of the issues are slower than the insanity of the first three, possibly meant as quiet, sarcastic reflection on social issues. That the series is, if not strictly autobiographical, at least very close to Ellis's heart, is clear. I would hope that the comic could remain as intense, even when its protagonist is writing about somber topics. Then again, Spider's columns are what the comic is about, and if these issues aren't full of heart-pounding action, they are still very good. The issue in which Spider becomes TV is almost completely static (a full three pages, 18 frames, consist of nothing but a view of Spider sitting in his chair) but is still one of the best stories. The pace picks up again in the last three issues, a 3-part story that has Spider pursued around The City by a neatness cult carrying his ex-wife's head in a jar. Extra-spectacular is the death of the police dog.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Morrison Lewis on August 3, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"I Hate it Here." Perhaps this best sums up the personality of Spider Jerusalem, renegade reporter and cynic of the first degree. Disgusted by the world around him, he leaves the city and lives as a hermit.
Years after his escape, his publisher drags him back into the city, wanting the books he was promised five years back. Needing money to live in the city, he whores himself out to The Word, a newspaper run by an old friend. These are his "adventures."
Spider is brilliant, witty, and cynical. Through his eyes, Ellis gives an outlook of a bizarre future in which Aliens have landed, corporate America manages to advertise in your dreams, and reporters can write off their drug habits as a journalistic expense.
This is the second collection of Transmetropolitan, following back on the streets. Reprinted are issues 4-12. Spider is both hostage and witness as events unfold. Fortunately, it's ammunition which he fires right back at the world.
Spider can turn anything into an article, from the consequences of cryogenic freezing and restoration to simple Television. He visits reservations from the sensible to the logical extreme, and provides political commentary (And even rearranges their bowels). He encounters death threats and tangles with religion.
Let's not beat around the bushes here. This is a comic book. Fancy words aside, it's packages exactly as Spider-Man or Batman would be. That's where the similarities end. This is not aimed at children, and probably shouldn't be read by children. There is blood, gore, nudity, and thought-provoking material
What we do have is Warren Ellis' own use of the medium--A twisted, often dark, and humorous look at a futuristic world. his portrayal is brilliant, steps ahead of almost every other writer in the field of comics.
Brilliance in such a simplistic medium. Such a refreshing and innovative series.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris Conroy on March 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
Warren Ellis had already established the "who"-- outlaw journalist Spider Jerusalem-- of TRANSMETROPOLITAN with his introductory arc, "Back On The Street"; now, he defines the where. The futuristic sprawl of the eponymous City is the future-shock extrapolation of all the cultures in every modern city; a new religion is created every hour, the TV plants ads in your brain, and on every corner there's a man in a suit full of speakers who'd just love to get you on the air for the feedsites. In this collection of six one-shot stories (And the uproarious pandemonium of "Freeze Me With Your Kiss"), Ellis and Robertson point their camera at the little things that make the City what it is, from brain-fried cryogenic refugees of the twentieth century (In the unbelievably touching story "another cold morning") to the Foglets, men and women who love technology so much that they were willing to have their minds transferred into functionally immortal clouds of floating nanotechnology. Through Spider Jerusalem's cynical eyes, however (And Ellis' perfect writing), there's no way to miss all the raw humanity flowing through all of these far-out visions. Profane and vulgar, but simultaneously hilarious and moving. A can't-miss for anyone who reads comics, and a must-see for someone who's always thought them to be just for kids.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
With this second collection of Transmetroploitan stories both Ellis and Robertson have really found their feet. One story shines in particular about the revival of the cryogenically frozen Mary, this short complete tale alone makes the book worth buying. Transmet isn't sci-fi, it's a comment on today, on where we're going and how we react to life in general- enough psyco-babble- just buy it and see for yourself.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Steve Luddington on February 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Oh where to start? If you've not read Transmetropolitan before, then you're probably not familiar with outlaw journalist Spider Jerusalem and his penchant for hard drug abuse. Bearing an uncanny resemblance to Hunter S. Thompson, Jerusalem has been dragged from his country retreat back into the city he hates in order to fulfill his contract with his editor "the whorehopper". He lands a job as a columnist for the (unnamed) city's biggest newspaper the Word and sets about rediscovering the city.
Lust for Life, the second book in the series sets up many of the vital elements that have greater significance as the series progresses, including one really important scene that you are guaranteed to overlook.
Unlike similarly praised graphic novels, such as the Sandman or Watchmen, the key to Transmetropolitan's success is its ultra-black humour. The book is packed with cruel one liners, wicked satire and ridiculous situations. Its concluding chapter Freeze Me With Your Kiss is at heart, a brilliant, foul-mouthed farce that has to be read to be believed. You've probably never read anything like it in your life!
To be honest, I can't do the book justice with just a review. Everyone that I've lent this book to have come banging on my door asking for the next one. And the one after that. and the one after that...
If you're easily offended then please save yourself the trouble and buy something nice and heartwarming that'll be turned into a
major motion picture starring Nicholas Cage anytime soon. Otherwise all I can say is BUY IT and see what the fuss is all about. Watch out though, you might find yourself addicted.
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