Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust for Life and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.83 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Connecting readers with great books since 1972. Used books may not include companion materials, some shelf wear, may contain highlighting/notes, may not include cd-rom or access codes. Customer service is our top priority!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust For Life Paperback – May 26, 2009


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.16
$7.40 $7.49

Dead Shift by Richard Phillips
Dead Shift by Richard Phillips
Enjoy the final chapter of the Rho Agenda Inception series. Learn more | See related books
$13.16 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust For Life + Transmetropolitan, Vol. 3: Year of the Bastard + Transmetropolitan, Vol. 1: Back on the Street
Price for all three: $36.34

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Warren Ellis and Darick Robertson take a Hunter S. Thompson analogue and put him through a 23rd century wringer. It's angry political sci-fi and it's funny as hell."

About the Author

Warren Ellis has created and written for The Authority, Transmetropolitan, Orbiter, the award-winning Planetary, and the forthcoming Ministry of Space. Darick Robertson is the artist and co-creator of Transmetropolitan. He is also the artist on The Boys and Fury, and creator of Space Beaver. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; New edition edition (May 26, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401222617
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401222611
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,916 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Erik Swedlund on October 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
The first book in the collected Transmetropolitan comics, Back on the Street, covers the first three issues. This, the second book, covers issues 4-12. While the first is pounding with intensity, here Spider Jerusalem settles into his setting and is put through his paces. Having gotten Spider out of his mountain retreat and back to reporting, it seems writer Warren Ellis started casting about to find something for Spider to do. A few of the issues are slower than the insanity of the first three, possibly meant as quiet, sarcastic reflection on social issues. That the series is, if not strictly autobiographical, at least very close to Ellis's heart, is clear. I would hope that the comic could remain as intense, even when its protagonist is writing about somber topics. Then again, Spider's columns are what the comic is about, and if these issues aren't full of heart-pounding action, they are still very good. The issue in which Spider becomes TV is almost completely static (a full three pages, 18 frames, consist of nothing but a view of Spider sitting in his chair) but is still one of the best stories. The pace picks up again in the last three issues, a 3-part story that has Spider pursued around The City by a neatness cult carrying his ex-wife's head in a jar. Extra-spectacular is the death of the police dog.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Morrison Lewis on August 3, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"I Hate it Here." Perhaps this best sums up the personality of Spider Jerusalem, renegade reporter and cynic of the first degree. Disgusted by the world around him, he leaves the city and lives as a hermit.
Years after his escape, his publisher drags him back into the city, wanting the books he was promised five years back. Needing money to live in the city, he whores himself out to The Word, a newspaper run by an old friend. These are his "adventures."
Spider is brilliant, witty, and cynical. Through his eyes, Ellis gives an outlook of a bizarre future in which Aliens have landed, corporate America manages to advertise in your dreams, and reporters can write off their drug habits as a journalistic expense.
This is the second collection of Transmetropolitan, following back on the streets. Reprinted are issues 4-12. Spider is both hostage and witness as events unfold. Fortunately, it's ammunition which he fires right back at the world.
Spider can turn anything into an article, from the consequences of cryogenic freezing and restoration to simple Television. He visits reservations from the sensible to the logical extreme, and provides political commentary (And even rearranges their bowels). He encounters death threats and tangles with religion.
Let's not beat around the bushes here. This is a comic book. Fancy words aside, it's packages exactly as Spider-Man or Batman would be. That's where the similarities end. This is not aimed at children, and probably shouldn't be read by children. There is blood, gore, nudity, and thought-provoking material
What we do have is Warren Ellis' own use of the medium--A twisted, often dark, and humorous look at a futuristic world. his portrayal is brilliant, steps ahead of almost every other writer in the field of comics.
Brilliance in such a simplistic medium. Such a refreshing and innovative series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris Conroy on March 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
Warren Ellis had already established the "who"-- outlaw journalist Spider Jerusalem-- of TRANSMETROPOLITAN with his introductory arc, "Back On The Street"; now, he defines the where. The futuristic sprawl of the eponymous City is the future-shock extrapolation of all the cultures in every modern city; a new religion is created every hour, the TV plants ads in your brain, and on every corner there's a man in a suit full of speakers who'd just love to get you on the air for the feedsites. In this collection of six one-shot stories (And the uproarious pandemonium of "Freeze Me With Your Kiss"), Ellis and Robertson point their camera at the little things that make the City what it is, from brain-fried cryogenic refugees of the twentieth century (In the unbelievably touching story "another cold morning") to the Foglets, men and women who love technology so much that they were willing to have their minds transferred into functionally immortal clouds of floating nanotechnology. Through Spider Jerusalem's cynical eyes, however (And Ellis' perfect writing), there's no way to miss all the raw humanity flowing through all of these far-out visions. Profane and vulgar, but simultaneously hilarious and moving. A can't-miss for anyone who reads comics, and a must-see for someone who's always thought them to be just for kids.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
With this second collection of Transmetroploitan stories both Ellis and Robertson have really found their feet. One story shines in particular about the revival of the cryogenically frozen Mary, this short complete tale alone makes the book worth buying. Transmet isn't sci-fi, it's a comment on today, on where we're going and how we react to life in general- enough psyco-babble- just buy it and see for yourself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
Spider Jerusalem has come off the mountain and...
Let me dispense with a small warning first. If you think that you might be offended - not easily, just offended - I'd dteer way clear of this book. I can't really describe any of the scenes in here and stay PG-13, but I'll try.
Spider Jerusalem has decided that he will investigate religion to write a column. That being done, he takes enough drugs not to sleep for three days, dresses himself in a toga (complete with motel logo from the stolen sheets), a tinfoil halo and a fake beard. Leaving his apartment, he decides to jump on a car ranting and raving about how religion is a crutch for the weak minded. His assistant boils his comments down (out of his hearing) thusly: "Take more breaths or just repeat 'I've taken lots of big red pills'." (that's a sanitized paraphrase). If you're not sure if that's offensive or not, it gets worse.
If you think that's funny, buy this book. It's a drug-soaked high-speed trip through a world gone crazy in the future. There are a few touching moments. For example, what happens when all the people that had themselves frozen in the past are raised in a future where cancer is cured and all that fun stuff. Think on the changes from 10 years ago to now, multiply by a large number. So what does society do with these visitors from the past? The answer is fairly interesting. In more than one way.
The artwork is beginning to hit its pace in this novel. Channon's (Spider's assistant and ex-stripper) face goes from a middle aged jowled version to a younger one, but I never liked how she came out. Her body is, of course, trim the whole time. That's comics for you. Spider's teeth have settled down and his broken tooth seems to gain a fixed location and is always there.
Overall, if this won't offend you, you are going to have to read it. Now.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust For Life
This item: Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust For Life
Price: $13.16
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?