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Travel-Log


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Audio CD, January 5, 1990
$30.73 $1.98
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Cale's ninth album is in keeping stylistically with all the previous ones: low-boil blues-based rock. The easygoing Tulsa native counterpoints his phlegmatic vocals with his stimulating guitar picking in some of his most homespun, charming songs ever. Bassist Tim Drummond and drummer Jim Keltner conjure the fetching grooves. -- © Frank John Hadley 1993 -- From Grove Press Guide to Blues on CD

1. Shanghaid
2. Hold On Baby
3. No Time
4. Lady Luck
5. Disadvantage
6. Lean On Me
7. End Of The Line
8. New Orleans
9. Tijuana
10. That Kind Of Thing
11. Who's Talking
12. Change Your Mind
13. Humdinger
14. River Boat Song

Product Details

  • ASIN: B0000004W1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #252,519 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
67%
4 star
29%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
5%
See all 21 customer reviews
JJ Cale always had a great groove.
Mark S. Heppler
They are a cut different from the early albums, but I really enjoy the dynamics of these songs.
Kindle Customer
Just when you start to relax, his guitar sneaks up and cuts you like a back-alley pickpocket.
Quinn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Matty N on February 18, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Initially I dismissed this album, as I'm skeptical about JJ's newer material. But while this release fails to capture the earthy, analog grit of classics like Naturally and Troubador it is still well worth owning.
Tunes like No Time and Lean On Me are vintage JJ. He also does a nice job of mixing genres on Lady Luck and Tijuana. End Of The Line, however, really makes the album - as Cale gets back to the raw precision that seems to have eluded his blues in recent decades...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gary J. Gravina on July 28, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This was the first album released after I discovered JJ, though the first one I purchased was Grasshopper. Once you've settled in to the dry warmth of albums like Naturally and Really, some of his later stuff can sound a little thin. But what you'll see is a progression from a drier sound to an overall wetter sound. Judging by the fact that his vocals remain virtually unmoved in the mix and in terms of EQ, you'd have to figure this is a willful decision on his part, in part prompted by the onset of digital recording/tachnology in general, and in part a function of his changing personal approach. Travel Log is a key transition from the higher presence of 5 through the analog/digital Yin & Yang of Grasshopper to the later more digitally dominated Number 10. If you're a fan of his followers Dire Straits, you've noticed a similar transition, and this would fall somewhere between Making Movies and Brothers In Arms (though quieter overall).

If you listen to interviews, you'll see that JJ has grabbed what technology has allowed him to record directly himself, but retained much of his original songwriting approach, born in the age where you had to be under 3 minutes just to "get on wax". On this album, you feel him stretch out a bit, though it's all JJ. Shanghaid and New Orleans have a bigger, more produced sound, while Lady Luck and End Of The Line have an intimate, almost casual sound that is really a breakthrough for JJ, whose best can often sound a bit distant. His guitar sound bounces around among the sounds of resonator, Stratocaster, and acoustic guitar. Tijuana is a high point for me, full of Latin atmosphere and his laid back wit, nimble acoustic plucking and electric bell tones.

If you have 5, Really, Grasshopper, and Naturally, this is in the very next tier, so pick it up. If you intend to collect them all, pick this one up sooner rather than later.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 17, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Having been on to J.J. Cale for quite awhile (since around '72 and, yeah, I know, hard to believe people live that long, huh?)I've had the opportunity to watch his career evolve although it sort of hasn't: J.J. Cale has ALWAYS been good and you can find stuff on his earliest albums that are just as good as anything more recent. Anyway, long story short: out of his distinguished body of work (and it is because Cale is a master, a genius and a true original) there are two truly "best" albums, this and "Troubadour." And I have to say that as much as I love "Troubadour," I actually listen to "Travel Log" more. The grooves on this album simply sizzle.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "jhazlegro" on April 13, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Ill start off by saying that I'm a big Jam fan. I love stuff like The Dead, String Cheese Incident, Phish, Particle, etc. So the other day, I was sitting at my computer listening to some Keller Williams (and if you like jam and havnt heard/heard of him, go listen to some right now) when my dad asked me what I was listening to. I told him, and he said it sounded kind of like this JJ Cale guy he likes. He gave me Travel Log, and I LOVED it. It had the same feel that all my favorite jam bands have. It was down to earth, bluesy, full of amazing riffs solos and harmonies, and packed full of energy and enthusiasm. This is a review by a jam fan, for other jam fands. If you like bluesy jam like leftover salmon, give this one a try. I bet youll like it.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lance Kozlowski on April 5, 2004
Format: Audio CD
In '94, this was my first exposure to JJ Cale, and I played it hundreds of times. I have since purchased quite a few of his earlier CDs. Though all his work seems fairly even and similar, I think this album has the greatest variety, the most sophisticated mixing of the ensemble players, and the most original and clever lyrics. The production mix is wonderfully layered and complex, yet somehow maintains the feel that it could have been recorded in a smoke filled garage. It has all the traditional sounds but steps outside of the reliance on blues and traditional themes.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 28, 1998
Format: Audio CD
J J Cale has produced many albums over the years, some of which have had many good songs. Among my favourites are Okie and Troubadour, for the number of good songs on each. However Cale excelled himself in Travel-Log. The good songs just keep coming. There is a diversity of atmosphere between the songs also, making the title Travel-Log rather appropriate: Shanghaid has an oriental feel, while Tijuana talks of Mexicans wishing to cross the border into the USA. In this song Cale showcases his abilities on a Spanish-style guitar. But probably the highlight of the album is the exceptional number of blues- influenced songs. The End of the Line is creative, as well as humorous, in a typically wry sort of way. Humdinger has a raucous guitar riff, and River Boat Song calls to mind a riverside scene: "River Goddamn, bring my baby home." Altogether a consistently good album, which far outshines Number 10 and Closer to You.
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