Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Big Savings in the Amazon Fall Sportsman Event Baby Sale
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $2.03 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Hard Travel to Sacred Pla... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Hard Travel to Sacred Places Paperback – September 11, 1995

12 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.92
$3.65 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$17.92 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Hard Travel to Sacred Places + Slow Fade + Flats / Quake
Price for all three: $49.02

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After the untimely death of their 21-year-old son, novelist/screenwriter Wurlitzer ( Little Buddha ) and his wife, photogapher Lynn Davis, embarked on a spiritual journey through Thailand, Burma (now Myanmar) and Cambodia, seeking solace and enlightenment from Buddhist sacred places. They found instead a consumer culture in which material desire has displaced the spiritual center with disastrous consequences for the indigenous practice of Buddhism. By the end of their journey, Wurlitzer and Davis have failed to find the illumination and peace they had so desperately sought. Unfortunately, readers will gain as little from this book as the authors did from their trip, for Wurlitzer's style is pretentious, and his questions, for one who claims to have practiced Buddhism, are sophomoric and self-conscious. Had he remembered that in Buddhism enlightenment comes only after one has forsaken all desire, he might have been able to transcend the physical and spiritual exhaustion that dominated his journey. Since he did not however, his readers are left likewise exhausted and without enlightenment.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Wurlitzer, the screenwriter for Bertolucci's Little Buddha, offers a fragmented narrative of a multipurpose fling through Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), and Cambodia. The author and his wife, a photographer on assignment, were mourning the death of his stepson (her son), exploring film projects, seeking spiritual soothing by visiting such sites as Tham Krabok and Angkor Wat, reporting on the sex shows of Bangkok, and apparently writing this book to pay for it all. The text is heavily larded with quotes on Buddhism and newspaper clippings of current events. Wurlitzer's contribution details the couple's fevers and aches-and inoperative hotel plumbing. The result is a superficial view of the area. Many good books are being published on this region and what its cultures can mean to us, for example, Sue Downie's Down Highway One (Allen & Unwin, 1993) and Stan Sesser's The Lands of Charm and Cruelty (LJ 5/1/93). This isn't one of them.
Harold M. Otness, Southern Oregon State Coll. Lib., Ashland
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala (September 11, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570621179
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570621178
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,682,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ben S. Leet on January 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
The author and his wife have been stunned by the accidental death of their 21 year-old son. They take an assignment to capture photographically the Buddhist images of the three countries toured in the book, Thailand, Myanmar (Burma) and Cambodia. It's very depressing, outwardly and inwardly. They cannot escape their grief, they encounter much more grief in this perverted war-ravaged part of the world. It becomes an existential malaise, no exit, quite moving. He quotes nicely different Rinpoche's, such as "All this doing has no more meaning than walking around a desert . . All this exertion produces no result." Touring the dilapidating temples of Anghor Wat the ennui becomes palpable. The book is a heroic fight against despair. Author and wife win, but at some cost. Good introduction to Buddhist scriptures that interlace and support narrative. I ended up admiring the author, thinking of buying his latest novel. He brings to life the old Buddhist story of the woman whose child died, beseeching Buddha for medicine to bring the son back to life, ending with, "Holy one, enough of this business of mustard seed. Only give me refuge."
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Vote Sizing Steve on September 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I couldn't differ more with the review by T. Gilbert! Sure this book is self-absorbed - but as the author journeys into himself he finds a universal suffrage. The author's courage to face off against death is remarkable in these times of flippancy and shallow know-it-all attitudes. The author is a wonderful guide through the darkness - and to be admired. There's nothing at all sophomoric that I could find in the book, nothing. It's as serious as it gets. The way that the author divides up the journey into a lusting/ignoring/hating triad of suffering is as an intuitive an expression of Buddhism as I have ever come across in my studies. Perhaps "every one has experienced loss in their life"; but few of us dare to share the accompanying humiliation with each other, or ourselves. Thank you Mr. Wurlitzer!
I also suggest Inside Thai Society: Religion, Everyday Life, Change by Niels Mulder and Bali, Sekala and Niskala: Essays on Religion, Ritual, and Art by Fred B. Eiseman for an exploration of how Buddhism can help guide us over, around, and under the many hurdles in life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Clark on May 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book was a loaner and, when the owner requested it back, I finally sat to read it first - I am very glad I did. As a practicing Buddhist convert, it spoke to me personally, but it wd. be a worthy read for non-Buddhists attempting to make sense of crisis or loss in their lives. The author and his wife journey to Asia to attempt to find solace and peace from his wife's tragic loss of her 21-year-old son, but end up being confronted with more difficulty, both philosophical and physical, than either imagined. The answers he was looking for must be gleaned, if at all, from a corrupt, hedonistic, often oppressive overlay that characterizes life in traditionally Buddhist areas they attempt to explore. In that sense, they tend to go from bad to worse in their attempt to find reward ... which, for those who appreciate such themes - as typified in Conrad's "Heart of Darkness ...makes finding the purpose of spiritual pilgrimages quite dicey, and not necessarily the peace-filled jaunt we hope for. In short, the author's journey forces him to look reality square in the face which, not surprisingly, is usually where profound healing can start. But it's a placed for the called and courageous (all of us, potentially). It is understandable why a few reviewers wd. dislike this book so much. It is dark - that's clearly the point - but, I believe, quite authentic and helpful. Not everyone's cup of tea ... in Pleasantville.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ronelle Coburn on September 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Not for the faint of heart (or the heartless). This compassionate and compelling little book packs a mighty wollop and takes you on a deep journey to the place inside of you that asks, "What's life all about anyway?"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
I read this because I liked the title, and thought the idea of the book - travelnig to a powerful place during a difficult time in life - was promising. The book turned out to be darker than I expected - but it was still moving and memorable. I read this book years ago but still recall passages and ideas from it. I think if I went to Cambodia or other places mentioned, I'd reread this short book - just to help give me a deep emotional context to consider while I'm there. Good - easy to read - but it might stay with you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By patrick brooks on April 27, 2015
Format: Paperback
Reads as a wrenchingly honest narrative of two people confronted with the deepest wound possible for a parent... the loss of a child.
As a Buddhist/meditator he does a good job of looking at events through the eyes and heart of an honest man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Hard Travel to Sacred Places
This item: Hard Travel to Sacred Places
Price: $17.92
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: thailand, cambodia, southeast asia, traveller