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Traveller (Braille) Paperback – June, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-1569563229 ISBN-10: 1569563225

 
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Product Details

  • Series: Braille
  • Paperback
  • Publisher: William a Thomas Braille (June 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569563225
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569563229
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 11.8 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,982,894 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The author of Watership Down devises an ironic, revisionist view of the Civil War as seen by Robert E. Lee's horse, Traveller. "Fans of Adams's earlier novels will rejoice in his undiminished gift for conveying both the physical life and the interior essence of an animal . . . . But the author's depiction of human action is less convincing, with repetitious, meandering delineations of encampments, advances and attacks," said PW.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The Civil War has been viewed from almost every possible perspective, but Adams breaks new ground: a first-person narrative, in dialect, by Robert E. Lee's horse. Traveller's equine memoirs are told to a cat in the stable of the retired general. There is a twist to this central event in American history: Traveller is unaware that Lee lost. Although Adams's five previous novels were well received, the mythic clarity and enchantment of Watership Down or Shardik are missing here. Still, interest in the previous novels should create demand. BOMC alternate. Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army TRALINET Ctr., Fort Monroe, Va.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author



Richard George Adams (born 9 May, 1920) is an English novelist, author of Watership Down, Shardik, Maia, The Plague Dogs, Traveller, Tales from Watership Down and many other books.

He originally began telling the story of Watership Down to his two daughters during a long car journey, and they insisted he write it down. When Watership Down was finally published, after many rejections, it sold over a million copies in record time in both the United Kingdom and the United States. Watership Down has become a modern classic and won both the Carnegie Medal and the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 1972. To date it has sold over 8 million copies and been translated into many languages, including Cherokee and Chinese.

Richard's goal is to tell a good story, ideally one so good you can't put it down! Three of his novels have been filmed so far, and he has just completed a story about a new character for very young children. Watch this space!

Richard currently lives in Hampshire, England. He has six grandchildren. He has written about his childhood and youth, including the time he served in the army in World War II, in 'The Day Gone By'.

Customer Reviews

I read it years ago and then decided to read it again.
kelly
Adams does a fine job of imagining and creating what a horse might perceive and would write if he could.
Susan
I know that you will come to read it time and time again, just like I have.
Beth Hixon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Ramona Honan on May 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Naturally, my favorite Richard Adams' novel is Watership Down, but the next favorite has got to be this book, Traveller. It is the simple of a horse who lived through horrible times. But this horse does not know why - because for the simple reason - he is just a horse.
He tells (as only a horse can) of the Civil War (or is it the War of Aggression?). He does not know. He is a horse. He does not understand why men are doing these horrible things to each other. Why they are killing each other. Why there is so pain and blood. Why there is no food. No water.
His only concern is his owner, the tall man in grey. It is his duty to carry him safely everywhere and without fear. Traveller does enjoy despite the hardship when he is allowed to parade with his rider in front of the many men who cheer - are they cheering him or his rider. He wants to do a grand job whatever.
It also tells of the horse and his owner - the bond they had for each other. Traveller's wanting to do as good a job as he can for his owner because of this bond.
I really enjoyed this book as it tells of the war without taking sides. Of course, Traveller cannot take sides. He is just a horse, therefore, he can tell of the war without being prejudice to either side. Just the facts - all the blood, the gore and the questioning of why.
If you can get a copy of this book, read it. It is a great novel.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ozark Trail Outrider VINE VOICE on October 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I frequently recommend this book to just about anyone I run across with even half an interest in the American Civil War. It is a wonderful new way to see some of the significant events of the civil war as seen from a horse's perspective. And what better horse than "Traveller".

I will agree that it helps to have some knowledge of the comings and goings of the Army of Northern Virginia, or you will not have much idea of where you are and at what point during the war. Of course this is perfectly accurate as our horse narrator has no idea of place names. For those readers familiar with the Civil War, you will find yourself recognizing the events described by Traveller and come away with a unique perspective of these campaigns. Antietam and Wilderness will come quickly to the informed reader's mind as Traveller remembers the events of those dark days.

This story is unabashedly told from a Southern perspective (not in a revisionist way as the opening editorial review suggests). It is after all told by a Southern Horse.

Richard Adams will capture your imagination as you dwell at length on the relationship that a man and his horse shared during one of the most momentous times in our nation's history.

After reading the book, take a road trip to Lexington, VA and to the chapel at Washington and Lee College. Outside the entrance you will find a grave stone covered with coins and carrots. There you will find Traveller.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jackie Tortorella VINE VOICE on August 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Richard Adams' brilliant book Traveller is like his other animal novels only in that Traveller thinks and talks to us. This is more of a Civil War chronicle, told from the unique perspective of General Lee's famous horse. The history is not tampered with in the least. In fact, I think a strong familiarity with Civil War history and Robert E. Lee in particular is almost essential to a full appreciation of this book. The subtle nuances are there to delight the reader who recognizes them!
So many people have written about General Lee, and the battles fought. There is enough great nonfiction and fiction about this subject to keep an avid reader occupied for a good long time. But Richard Adams has found a way to bring something new to the Civil War...what an accomplishment!
If you have always been intrigued by the lore of Robert E. Lee, and can let your imagination run free, you are in for a tremendous treat. The story is still sad. The human suffering of the war is graphically portrayed, and the misery of the horses is given its due as well. I absolutely hated to approach the end of the book, because I knew how it had to end. But Adams' treatment of the end of the War and the end of Lee's life is perfect. In fact, the last sentence of the book by itself renders it worth your time.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
I find it astounding that an English-born man could so accurately capture Southern colloquial, and spin a story so vividly emeshed with the spirit of the the Southern heart! I love everything I have ever read by Richard Adams, and never cease to be amazed at his literary genius and diversity.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
Since borrowing this book from the Public Library several years ago I have constantly searched for a copy. No other book about the Civil War had such a lingering impact on my Southern consciousness. How perfect that an animal, General Lee's beloved horse, reveals to us the stark realities of war with none of the political alignments of a human narrator. I wish this book were back in print...I would buy enough copies to insure that my family for generations to come would read it and "remember" what war really is.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 4, 1997
Format: Audio Cassette
As with his other books, Richard Adams's primary narrator is an animal. In this case, the animal is Robert E. Lee's beloved steed, Traveller. In the book named for the horse, the horrors of the civil war and the plight of the south are brought to light. Traveller has a unique view of the war because he was on the front lines but could not understand (from a horse's point of view) what all of the fighting was about. Instead, Traveller focuses on his relationship with Lee and Lee's relationships with the men around him. While Traveller is historically accurate, the reader is challenged to determine the characters and events behind the charicatures. Traveller refers to various participants in his own terms, resorting to more descriptives than acutal names. The reader will chuckle at descriptives such as "Cap in His Eyes" for Stonewall Jackson (whose horse was equally lank and serious). The book is ironically poignant on several fronts; from Traveller's eternal optimism over the success of the South in the war, confusion about God and war, to his view that Robert E. Lee must be the most important man in the world. In the end Traveller, like Adams's aclaimed Watership Down, shows us just how silly man's actions really are. Traveller is sweet, funny, and occasionally sad but ultimately engrossing and educational
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