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Treason Paperback – January 24, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 275 pages
  • Publisher: Orb Books; Reprint edition (January 24, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765309041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765309044
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #519,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After the success in recent years of his mature work (the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning SF diptych Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead and the excellent fantasy, Seventh Son ), the energetic Card returns to his 1979 second novel originally titled A Planet Called Treason . Limiting his rewriting to presentation rather than plot, Card is left with a good story that looks forward to his better work. Arrogant, sophisticated Lanik Mueller, scion of a clan that can regenerate their bodies, learns humility and much else during his exile in "primitive" lands. With his new powers, including the ability to cause earthquakes and drain lakes, he leads his countrymen in revolt against their conquerors. As in his later, better known work, Card provides a colorful dramatization of ethical issues and questions of identity against a backdrop of bizarrely fascinating races from the tree-dwelling Nkumai to the time-manipulating Ku Kuei.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Cursed by the uncontrollable manifestation of his family's natural gift for self-healing and bodily regeneration, Lanik Mueller begins a planet-wide journey that reveals the mysterious origins of human existence on the planet Treason and leads him to challenge the assumptions of a society based on warfare and greed. This expanded version of A Planet Called Treason exemplifies Card's talent for creating disturbingly compelling, beautifully written stories. JC
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Orson Scott Card is the bestselling author best known for the classic Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow and other novels in the Ender universe. Most recently, he was awarded the 2008 Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in Young Adult literature, from the American Library Association. Card has written sixty-one books, assorted plays, comics, and essays and newspaper columns. His work has won multiple awards, including back-to-back wins of the Hugo and the Nebula Awards-the only author to have done so in consecutive years. His titles have also landed on 'best of' lists and been adopted by cities, universities and libraries for reading programs. The Ender novels have inspired a Marvel Comics series, a forthcoming video game from Chair Entertainment, and pre-production on a film version. A highly anticipated The Authorized Ender Companion, written by Jake Black, is also forthcoming.Card offers writing workshops from time to time and occasionally teaches writing and literature at universities.Orson Scott Card currently lives with his family in Greensboro, NC.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Very interesting and unusual characters that added to the intrigue.
CJ
And the imagination of it - creating so many civilizations that were so amazingly unique!
Lutya
This is one of the best stories I have ever read in Science Fiction/Fantasy.
Z. D. Mikkelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By frumiousb VINE VOICE on October 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Treason shows evidence of many of the concerns that Card would come to have in his later novels-- self-determination, actualization of innate ability, the morality of violent self-defense versus the morality of pacifism, and the destiny of brilliant youths.

Set on a planet where the best radical minds of a generation were exiled without iron, Treason uses science fiction as a background for a thoughtful look at some serious issues.

Treason is clearly an early novel, and has aspects that are too obviously allegorical. In later works, the same allegorical bent will be expanded and the context of the world around the story will become fuller.

Recommended for Card fans. There is nothing to be disappointed in here, and should provide an interesting look at the roots of his later writing. People not already familiar with Card will probably want to begin somewhere else-- Wyrms or the Ender Wiggins books.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Charles E. Stevens VINE VOICE on July 5, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An epic tale combining mystery and fantasy, Treason more than meets expectations--I'd even go so far as to say that it's one of Card's best. Although the storylines are completely different, Card visits moral dilemmas familiar to readers of the Ender series: is genocide an acceptable tradeoff for the salvation of an entire planet? Is the sacrifice of one individual justifiable for the greater good of an entire race? In Ender's Game, Card creates a cold and oppressive cage known as Battle School to confine young Ender. In Treason, Card creates a lush and diverse world for his protagonist Lanik Mueller to explore in his exile. Whereas Ender's growth is largely internal and self-driven, Mueller picks up extraordinary powers while walking the earth, meeting new people and learning new skills. Lanik is frequently forced to ask himself deeper questions about life, sacrifice, and identity, all the while understanding that the more he learns, the more complex and difficult his choices become. He starts the novel alone and a freak; saving his own skin is almost more than he can manage. He ends the novel with terrible powers and the responsibility that comes with them, forced to choose the best way to save a planet hurtling towards destruction and death. Unlike Ender, he is fully aware of the choice he must make, making his decision all the more anguishing and tragic.

Card takes many risks in creating a fantastic world that the reader must simply accept as is--this tale belongs more to the realm of fantasy than pure "science" fiction. Yet the risk pays off, making the reading experience all the more memorable. The reader is drawn in by the nature of the protagonist's grotesque transformation and the beauty of a world that stretches the imagination.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Hillary Corwin on May 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
Not since Ender's Game has a book so successfully denied me my much-needed rest. Treason took me two days to read -- only interrupted by two eight-hour shifts that I refused to call in for, and, even then, it stole my breaks.
Now, while I would like to resent the work itself for exhausting me so, I could never bring myself to hate something so brilliantly constructed, so perfectly woven and so beautifully written. Card's outdone himself this time. A first-person shifting-milieu character piece -- only Card could pull that off. And pull it off, he did. It was, perhaps, the greatest reading experience of my life.
Life, death, fear, discovery, perseverance, deception...all incorporated into a story that shakes the earth at will, makes the hours pass like minutes, and engages the reader's imagination so greatly -- so completely -- that he/she might well radically regenerate a second, maybe even third mind. This book was so damned good that I bought a second to lend to friends.
I have no higher a recommendation. Satisfied?
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By David A. Lessnau on November 15, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first read "Treason" a couple of decades ago and loved it. I just finished re-reading it and I still love it. Even though the book is only his 2nd one published, it's amazingly well done. It's interesting that this early work is more "cerebral" than his later ones. In the newer books, he drags you into the situation more by your emotions than by your intellect. In this one, his methodology is reversed.

The only reason I give this book 4 stars out of 5 instead of 5 stars out of 5 is because there are a couple of situations where the main character behaves just flat-out stupidly. Of course, Card needs those brain-freeze moments to carry out the plot. But, they're disconcerting. A minor quibble in such a work, but definitely noticeable. Still, an excellent book. Highly recommended.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have read most of Card's works, but for some reason this gem had eluded me until recently. Once I started reading, I couldn't put the book down - I finished within a few hours. It was a great medley of adventure, mystery, sci-fi and fantasy. A terrific story that I would recommend for all mature readers (there is some graphic detail that younger or sensitive readers may find objectionable) and fans of Orson Scott Card. Right up there with "Ender's Game", "Enchantment" and the Alvin books.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. Marchant on December 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
The metal-poor prison planet Treason is divided among 80 clans that are descended from the members of an intellectual cabal that threatened a populist empire 3 millenia ago. By selectively trading precious iron with each clan, the empire reinforces specialization, competition, and social fragmentation across the planet.

In Treason, Orson Scott Card tells the story of Lanik Mueller, a "radical regenerative" who is exiled from his clan of geneticists. Wandering (and bleeding) from land to land, he picks up capabilities and insights from each of the clans and eventually breaks his world free from Imperial control.

This book is a modest revision of Card's second novel, A Planet Called Treason. It's as solidly written and satisfying as any of his science fiction novels, Ender's Game excluded. Card demonstrates his talent for crafting SciFi with virtually no investment in science or technology.

Like all the SciFi classics (and prefiguring the Ender series), Treason is principally a vehicle for painless examination of social, moral, and ethical conundrums. I'm reminded that Card's greatest strength is his ability to honestly examine his characters and their issues from every side.
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