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A Treasury of Irish Myth, Legend & Folklore (Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry / Cuchulain of Muirthemne) Hardcover – May 11, 1988


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A Treasury of Irish Myth, Legend & Folklore (Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry / Cuchulain of Muirthemne) + The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore (Celtic, Irish) + Celtic Myths and Legends
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Avenel Books (May 11, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 051748904X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517489048
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.2 x 2.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #101,126 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Introduce yourself to the noble heroes and magical creatures of Irish mythology. Includes the two definitive works on the subject by the giants of the Irish Renaissance. W.B. Yeates' Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry and Lady Gregory's Cuchulain of Muirthemne.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 61 people found the following review helpful By hbcarter on August 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
In the first section of this book (Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry), Yeats gathered a large number of stories (about 65) on a variety of supernatural subjects. I found some a little perplexing, but most were enjoyable. The second part of this book is Lady Gregory's Cuchulain of Muirthemne. Being unfamiliar with the legend of Cuchulain, I am unable to compare this version with any others. However, I found it to be an interesting tale of an epic hero, although I had difficulty keeping track of the names of all of the characters and locations.
Having only read American variants of Irish folklore, I was caught off guard by the style and structure of the stories. Readers should not expect them to follow the Brothers Grimm, "Once upon a time...happily ever after"-type construction. However, if you're familiar with Irish myths or you're up for trying something new, this collection is thoroughly entertaining.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Z Hayes HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love reading stories of various cultures' folktales, myths, and legends, and came across this title recently. What a magical reading experience! This is indeed a treasury of Irish myth, legend, and folklore, compiled in two parts,i.e. fairy and folk tales of the Irish peasantry, and Cuchulain of Muirthemne: The Story of the Men of the Red Branch of Ulster, by Lady Gregory.

William Butler Yeats edited the first part, which consists of the most renowned tales of the magical creatures of Ireland. These tales were painstakingly compiled from other expert writers and based upon Yeats' own research, and the collection is further enhanced by Yeats' own prose.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Christopher R. Travers on December 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This collection is in two parts. The first part is a collection of Irish folktales concerning fairy folk, witchcraft, ghosts, devils, saints, and so forth. It is an important collection for any amateur folklorist. Many of the tales are well told and are sources for other collections (including Kevin Crossley Holland's "Folktales of the British Isles") but unlike most anthologies with a wider focus, this contains a very large amount of specifically Irish material.

The second component is that of Lady Gregory's retelling of the Ulster Cycle. This too is quite well done, though there have been many translations since (and I personally am fond of the Kinsella translation).

I would highly recommend this book.
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By B. Reese on January 22, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
great bedtime reading and the second half of the book is the story of Cuchalainn, one of the great Irish stories. very entertaining
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By Faedorah Jones on November 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is wonderful. In fact it's so wonderful my son borrowed it the day I got it and I haven't seen it since. I can't wait until he moves and I can go to his room and get it back. (Also, I was surprised it was a hard cover...I was expecting paperback.)
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