Three Treatises on the Divine Images and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$14.08
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $2.92 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Three Treatises on the Di... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Three Treatises on the Divine Images (St. Vladimir's Seminary Press Popular Patristics Series) Paperback – October 1, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.08
$12.22 $2.72
$14.08 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Three Treatises on the Divine Images (St. Vladimir's Seminary Press Popular Patristics Series) + Athanasius : The Life of Antony and the Letter To Marcellinus + RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict in English
Price for all three: $28.33

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card
Receive a $25 Amazon.com Gift Card for Fine Art Purchases of $100 or more. Restrictions apply, see offer for details.

Product Details

  • Series: St. Vladimir's Seminary Press Popular Patristics Series
  • Paperback: 163 pages
  • Publisher: St Vladimirs Seminary Pr; 1 edition (October 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881412457
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881412451
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 4.8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #163,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Greek

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Canicus on August 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
When Christians began destroying all sorts of religious images in the 8th century, St. John of Damascus put pen to paper to defend their practice, and anyone who wishes to say that Christians who use images in worship are idolators must first deal with this book.

He makes three basic arguments. First, he points out they did not worship images, but revere them as a window or pointer towards a heavenly reality, much like how most Christians would treat the printed Word (the book itself is not sacred, the messages contained in it are).

Secondly, the use of images is not only not forbidden in the Old Testament, but is actually commanded (the Ark, for instance, or the bronze serpent). Thus, only "idols" are forbidden, not images (actually, it is the word "eidol" in the Septuagint that St. John would have used).

Third, when God became man, He effectively gave us an image, Himself. To deny that images have a valid place in worship is to deny the Incarnation of Christ, and the Trinity is the very heart of Christianity.

St. John the Damascene makes these arguments bluntly and succinctly. He believed that he was holding up the traditional view of Christianity, and he did this in Syria, then controlled by Islam which forbids the use of images. His defence made him unwelcome in the Empire and it placed him at odds with a core teaching of his rulers. Given that he thus risked his life to write these, Christians should give him a firm hearing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stratiotes Doxha Theon VINE VOICE on January 4, 2008
Format: Paperback
When the Byzantine emperor Leo III and sided with the iconoclasts and ordered the destruction of images he came into direct conflict with the traditions of the church. St. John of Damascus risked livelihood and life to publicly denounce the iconoclasts and Leo by name in these 3 treatises. The first treatise seems an immediate from-the-hip response, the second is provided to expound on some of the ideas that some readers/hearers might have misunderstood, the third is a more detailed and thorough response to iconoclasm and church authority in general.

St. John takes on the iconoclasts from several directions. With respect to their use of scriptural prohibitions against images, St. John responds with church tradition as the guide to interpreting scripture and challenges those who would "remove the ancient boundaries, set in place by our fathers" [Prov 22:28]. He reminds his listeners several times in these sermons that, "Not only has the ordinance of the Church been handed down in writings, but also in unwritten traditions." And ends the first sermon on that theme with, "Therefore I entreat the people of God, the holy nation, to cling to the traditions of the Church. " Referring to Ezek 20:25 in light of Matt 19:7-8 with Heb 1:1-3, St. John says, "And I say to you, that Moses, on account of the hardness of heart of the sons of Israel, ordered them not to make images, for he knew their tendency to slip into idolatry. But now it is not so; we stand securely on the rock of faith enriched by the light of knowledge of God." The authority of the church to interpret scripture based on the sacred tradition is without doubt in John's eyes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Donna Vernal on January 11, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this for the very fact that I am not good at reacting to non believers questions about my faith and this book helped me so much I will read it a second time. It is very easy to follow as well and not many of the books like this are. I think it is a very good book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John Philoponus on April 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
"John of Damascus helped to secure the future of art in the service of Christ. Without his brilliant defense, both profound and at times earthly, we might well have had no icons, murals, and mosaics in churches to elevate and enrich our spirits." L. Wickham, Cambridge Divinity

Icons then & now:
The Orthodox attitude toward icons developed out of the iconoclastic struggle of the eighth and ninth centuries. During the reformation, early church reformers were iconoclasts, they believed it impossible to portray the divinity of Christ, and thus found it heretical to portray only his humanity. The Eastern solution to the icons of Christ was to focus on the image, which God made visible in the flesh, emphasizing the divine nature of the humanly experienced Christ. This strictly adhered to a traditional portrayal by copying a likeness from one image to another, revert to early 'iconic writings', rather than mere imagination or interpretation. The features of icons are similar because they are portraits based on historical prototypes, unlike Western art, individual visualizations of figures available for unending imagination. These representations help Eastern Orthodox in worship, though inevitably flawed, by providing a blurred vision of spiritual truth.

Icons, a Western View:
"...the icon Fr. Barbour purchased wherein one sees the women 'Orthodoxy, and 'Hellas,' this is a coy and clever rhetorical strategy. ... It is also suggestive of that ubiquitous caricature of Orthodoxy we are all well aware of: the Orthodoxy that is nothing more than the idolatrous synthesis of faith and cultural identity." The Ochlophobist, Oct.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?