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Triangle

12 customer reviews

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Audio CD, March 11, 2003
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Editorial Reviews

Their 1967 album got critical raves (Lillian Roxon called it "the album that astonished everyone and blew a million minds") for its artful blend of orchestration (from Van Dyke Parks) and the strength of Ron Elliott’s songwriting. A haunting, beautiful record.

1. Are You Happy
2. Only Dreaming Now
3. Painter Of Women
4. The Keeper Of Time
5. It Won't Get Better
6. Nine Pound Hammer
7. Magic Hollow
8. And I've Seen Her
9. Triangle
10. The Wolf Of Velvet Fortune
11. Old Kentucky Home

Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 11, 2003)
  • Original Release Date: 1967
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Collector's Choice
  • ASIN: B00006RYJ8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #141,170 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
33%
1 star
0%
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 7, 2003
Format: Audio CD
One of my current soap box arguments is that the Beau Brummels are the best Sixties group that you (a) never heard of or (b) do not remember, even though they were the first American rock band influenced by the Beatles to have a hit ("Laugh, Laugh," produced by Sly Stone, which hit #15 in 1965). They were considered by many to be the first folk-rock group (yes, they were recording before the Byrds) and were also out in front of the San Francisco psychedelic sound. Eventually they even got around to experimenting with country-rock as well by the end of the Sixties. The pan centered around guitarist/songwriter Ron Elliott and lead singer Sal Valentino. Elliott's music was both moody and melodious, and with Valentino the Beau Brummels had one of the finest voices in rock 'n' roll. You just want to know going in that if I can persuade you to check out one Beau Brummel album you are going to end up wanting to track down some more of their music.
After their debut album "Trinagle," a 1967 release, would be the Beau Brummel's second strongest album, avoiding the failing of the efforts in between where original material was sacrificed for weaker covers to try and boister their commercial prospects. Rounding out the group is bass player Ron Meagher, but Van Dyke Parks shows up to play some really nice harpsichord and keyboards on this album. The songs eleven songs on "Triangle" represent the full music spectrum of the Beau Brummels, with folk-rock, country-rock, and British-pop all mixed together. In the wake of "Sgt. Pepper," there is an impulse to think of "Triangle" as also being a concept album, with many of the songs dealing with the mystical aspects of dreams, but the end result is more a consistent theme than a cohesive whole.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 14, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This superb album reminds us of "Younger Than Yesterday" by the Byrds from the same year. This album effectively mixes country, pop, psychedelia, and folk-rock. "Magic Hollow", "Painter of Women", "Wolf of Velvet Fortune", "I'm Only Dreaming Now", "Triangle", and "Nine Pound Hammer" are just some of the incredible songs the Beau Brummels were writing/covering at the time. Ron Elliot's song writing is very strange, intense, and mystical. How this album slipped out of the public's eye is one of life's great mysteries. This is mainly a critic's album. If your a fan of the Dead, Led Zepplin, or late Pink Floyd you may not like the Beau Brummels or for that matter understand them.There are very few San Fransisco albums this strong. The albums "From The Vaults" and "Bradley's Barn" are also excellent and highly recommended.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mark Roland on December 7, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This album is not for everyone as you will discover in the sampling of reviews. I won't repeat the circumstances that led to it's creation or it's undeserved obscurity, that has been done well enough. What I think you need to to consider if you are curious about this release are your feelings about studio production.

It is a LAVISH work, with strings and horn arrangements that are certainly grand by any estimation. The songs are not the personal kind of "Pet Sounds" wannabes as someone suggested, but stories. Intricate, well crafted and diverse tales of mystical characters and dreams mixed with sly commentaries of a more contemporary focus, complimenting each other beautifully. Now if you don't like elaborate studio records, prefering a rougher stripped down approach, this will not be something you are likely to dig. Overdone, you might say. I am firmly in the other camp, as long as the orchestration is done well and suits the artist and material. Here it is magic to my ears, and does reach the heights of late 60s Los Angeles studio quality. My only regret is the length, at about 29 minutes, you want more.

I do think it compares favorably to The Family Tree's "Miss Butters" and, dare I say it," Sgt. Pepper" in it's scope , execution and quality. Despite the brilliance of their earlier singles, this was the Beau Brummels finest moment.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Scott Marchington on April 23, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This music is haunting and felt deep. I contine to be amazed at the depth of quality in the music, all from a time when albums contained a hit, mayby another good song or two, but was mostly filler. This one is great from the begining to the end. This is like the Beatles Revolver. A dramatic change in direction form thier previous efforts. I especially liked "Magic Hollow"
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By OLD GUY. on June 9, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Are You Happy? You will be after this record. Are You Happy? is a great intro to a very cool-for-the-days album. 1967. Apart from the fanciful cover copy linking all the songs into a mystical program, the songs as songs are each important entities. Ron Elliott is always a first-rate songwriter and Sal Valentino is the perfect guy to sing them. He also wrote with Elliott. Pleasing acoustic guitars everywhere, nice period piece orchestrations--accordion, banjo, horns, cellos, electrics, and Van Dyke Parks harpsicord. Only Dreaming Now, Painter of Women, It Won't Get Better--all gems. A cover of the Merle Travis biggie, Nine Pound Hammer, gets a great vocal and nice electrics in the background. A perfectly normal choice then--maybe curious for today. As everyone who knows these tunes knows, Magic Hollow is the standout track. It's perfectly uncommon. Updated, this could be amazing. The title tune has the typical Beau Brummels touch. And then The Wolf of Velvet Fortune. My,my. Mysterious intro, beautiful guitars--a very rare style of song. And reverb settings. They should have ended the program here. Covering Newman's hokeyness doesn't fit the temper or tone. Bringing some of these tunes into the future might require some Orange or Marshall amps! But their versions are far more appropriate. I guess.
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