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Tribeca Blues Hardcover – October 13, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; First Edition edition (October 13, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399150889
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399150883
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,797,082 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Tragedy colors Terry Orr's every move, nearly his every thought. Five years ago his infant son's stroller rolled off a subway platform, his wife dove after it, and both died under a train. Since then, Terry has focused on pursuing the madman who pushed the stroller, a crusade that led him to get a private investigator's license (as fans know from his first two books, Closing Time and A Well-Known Secret). In Tribeca Blues, the death of a close friend, bar owner Leo Mallard, leads Terry into a case with roots stretching back to Leo's twisted family in New Orleans. But, as always, Terry's quest for justice and closure in his own life takes center stage, and this time his obsessive digging turns up profound surprises, altering his picture of what happened that fateful day.

Jim Fusilli's fine writing paints a vivid, noir-tinged portrait of New York's streets and people, and only the most cold-hearted reader could fail to care about Terry, his daughter Bella, and many other vividly drawn, often damaged characters. Fusilli's sense of place and pacing falter a bit in New Orleans--including a section near the end, which sags noticeably--but most of the story is set in the Big Apple, and is pitch-perfect. This is one of the most powerful, enjoyable crime tales of the season. --Nicholas H. Allison

From Publishers Weekly

Still plagued by the tragic loss of his wife and son five years earlier, sometime PI Terry Orr finally gets a chance to find the man he thinks killed them in Fusilli's third installment of his Tribeca series (Closing Time; A Well-Known Secret). Distanced from his surviving daughter (the intellectually precocious teenaged Bella, who's just completed her first book), Terry has been seeing a shrink to little effect, although his blossoming relationship with prosecutor Julie Giada seems to be helping a bit. Two incidents kick the plot into gear: first, the death of Leo Mallard, Terry's longtime friend and owner of a struggling TriBeCa watering hole called the Tilt, and second, Terry's discovery of a fresh clue in his search for the Madman, Raymond Weisz, the lunatic genius Terry blames for taking his wife and son. But as Terry probes the darkness, searching for Weisz by interviewing eyewitnesses to the tragedy (and while he tries to execute Leo's will, against a rising tide of resentment from Leo's widow and sister), he learns some harsh truths about the circumstances of his wife's fate and the Madman's role in it. Right about the time Leo's drunken widow decides to claim her inheritance at point-blank range, Terry threatens to unravel. Terry is an appealing character, a single parent still suffering from incalculable loss, trying to raise his daughter in a neighborhood also struggling to pull itself together. Putnam is obviously grooming Fusilli to take his place in its stable of mystery bestsellers, and the follow-up to this sometimes rough but necessary narrative link in the series may well do it.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Jim Fusilli is an American writer. He serves as the rock and pop music critic of The Wall Street Journal and is the author of six novels. A native of Hoboken, NJ, he lives in New York City.

Fusilli's debut novel, the mystery "Closing Time," is the last work of fiction set in New York City published prior to the 9/11 attacks. The following year, Fusilli's mystery "A Well-Known Secret" addressed the impact of 9/11 on the residents of New York City. Two novels for adults followed: "Tribeca Blues" and "Hard, Hard City," which Mystery Ink magazine named its 2004 Novel of the Year.

In 2005, Fusilli wrote "Pet Sounds," his tribute to Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys' classic album. Described as "an experiment in music journalism," the book combines the rhythm and emotional weight of his fiction with the often-unorthodox observations of his music criticism for the Journal, for whom he has written since 1983.

Fusilli served as the editor of, and contributed chapters to, the award-winning serial thrillers "The Chopin Manuscript" and "The Copper Bracelet." His novel for young adults "Marley Z and the Bloodstained Violin" was published in 2008.

Fusilli has written and published many short stories; in several, he developed Narrows Gate as the setting, depicting the city in different eras. "Chellini's Solution," which appeared in the 2007 edition of the Best American Mystery Stories, features Narrows Gate in the years following World War II. "Digby, Attorney at Law" portrays the fictional city in the early 1960s. "Digby" was nominated for the Edgar and Macavity awards in 2010.

Fusilli is married to the former Diane Holuk, a senior public relations executive. They have a daughter, Cara, a graduate of the New School.

Customer Reviews

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Keep 'em coming!
Bee-Bee
There are surprises in this book that actually had me gasping.
shelly silver
This third book in the series is another excellent book.
Kevin Tipple

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bookreporter on October 17, 2003
Format: Hardcover
First of all, if you have not read Jim Fusilli's CLOSING TIME and A WELL-KEPT SECRET, please stop reading this right now, obtain those books, read them, and come back. I'll be happy to wait.
Thank you. TRIBECA BLUES is the third of Fusilli's novels to feature Terry Orr. Orr is by turns a novelist, an erstwhile pro bono private investigator and occasionally hapless father --- a man quietly but severely damaged by the death of his wife and infant son. You can probably experience TRIBECA BLUES without reading CLOSING TIME and A WELL-KEPT SECRET, but sledding through TRIBECA BLUES is a bit easier if you read its predecessors first. You also will be able to fully appreciate how good Fusilli has been right out of the gate and how he seems to be developing into such a great writer that we may need to start creating new adjectives to describe what he is doing.
TRIBECA BLUES begins with Orr and Bella, his (precocious, but not overly so) 15-year-old daughter gently interacting, a scene that is a prelude to the death of a close friend of Orr. Orr's friend leaves him a bequest and a request, one that takes Orr, Bella and their friends to New Orleans for a funeral and the beginning of a quest to bring Orr's friend the justice that was denied him during his life. While in New Orleans, Orr is advised that the mother of Raymond Weisz, the man suspected of murdering Orr's wife and son, has passed away. Orr immediately returns to New York City to attend the funeral, believing that Weisz will be compelled to attend his mother's funeral, if only to assure himself that she is dead. The funeral becomes a catalyst for Orr's discovery that everything he knew about his wife and her death seems to be dreadfully, horribly wrong. It also dovetails into Orr's quest on behalf of his late friend.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on October 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It's been five years since Raymond Weisz allegedly threw his infant son on the railroad tracks in the path of an oncoming train. His wife Marina was also killed when she jumped down to rescue her son. Terry Orr is still determined to track down the man and kill him but in the meantime he and his fifteen-year-old daughter Bella go to New Orleans to attend the funeral of his friend Leo Mallard.
Leo wanted Terry to find his wife so she could face justice. Lenore caused their flourishing restaurant to go into bankruptcy because she embezzled company funds. Terry has every intention of fulfilling Leo's last request but while he is in New Orleans he gets a fax stating Weisz's mother died. Believing that his family's killer will finally show at the funeral, Terry rushes back to New York City. As he talks to a person who had seen the subway killings of Terry's family members, the witness is murdered. As Terry searches for Raymond, he begins to learn the truth to that deadly incident five years ago and why Leo's reputation and happiness was destroyed.
The protagonist of TRIBECA BLUES, a man readers have come to care about, conducts two different investigations in his own quixotic manner. Having a private investigator's license doesn't harden the man nor does the tragedy that haunts him or seeing the dark side of humanity. Instead it allows Terry to take action and feel he is part of making the world a better place. Jim Fusilli gives his audience an insider's look at the Big Apple he loves so much and come to understand why he loves the city that never sleeps.
Harriet Klausner
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is ellen in atlanta, and Jim Fusilli's newest Terry Orr book has arrived and the story and character lines are getting more potent and heady -- survivors - like the folks after 9/11 in the TriBeCa area - Orr has been striking out to find the man who he thinks purposely killed his infant son and wife - the last 5 years of his life has been stagnant - and he needs answers and needs to move on with his life, writing career, or pi career, and the lady friend in his life, and the light of his life, his daughter, Bella - he receives answers he did not expect, yet shows how big his heart is and helps closure-
Time for Terry to shine in the next novels!
Bravo Fusilli!!!
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Format: Hardcover
This book is located primarily in New York City (Manhattan) but some takes place in Louisiana. He creates in an atmospheric "noir" mood about an angry man searching for the truth in both places.

I think I liked this book less than the first I read by him, A Well Known Secret (which was written in the wake of 9-11 and captured the country's mood well). I was tiring a bit of the main character, Terry Orr, in this book (it has, after all, been five years since wife and baby died, hit by a subway train, and he's still awash in rage and self-pity).

Still, the book is well worth a read because Fusilli writes so well. In this book, a lot of what Terry Orr has believed gets turned upside down. The book begins with the natural death of a friend of his (Leo, found dead in his own bar). Terry finds a letter from Leo asking him to find the Leo's ex-wife and punish her somehow for what she's done. Terry sets out to find her, but has not lost sight of his 5-year goal of finding the person who pushed his son's stroller onto the tracks in front of an incoming train so he can punish THAT man. Somehow these two plots wind together.

The other thing I didn't like was the negative view of women apparent in this book -- the only female I liked was basically a child (Terry's daughter Bella) -- the adult women were despicable (avaricious and cruel) or made carpets of themselves (Terry's girlfriend, although, despite seeing her for 3 years, he won't call her that). I think this is probably more of a man's book -- as a woman, I found it hard to not be bothered by his portrayal of women. At the end, one of the characters asks Terry if he likes women, and Terry says that he does. I didn't believe Terry, and I have some questions about the author. He really needs to give this matter some deep thought.
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