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The Trilisk Ruins (Parker Interstellar Travels Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Michael McCloskey
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (133 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Telisa Relachik studied to be a xenoarchaeologist in a future where humans have found alien artifacts but haven't ever encountered live aliens. Of all the aliens whose extinct civilizations are investigated, the Trilisks are the most advanced and the most mysterious.

Telisa refuses to join the government because of her opposition to its hard-handed policies restricting civilian investigation and trade of alien artifacts, despite the fact that her estranged father is a captain in the United Nations Space Force.

When a group of artifact smugglers recruits her, she can't pass up the chance at getting her hands on objects that could advance her life's work. But she soon learns her expectations of excitement and riches come with serious drawbacks as she ends up fighting for her life on a mysterious alien planet.


Editorial Reviews

From the Author

A 69,000 word science fiction adventure.

About the Author

Michael McCloskey is a software engineer in Silicon Valley afflicted with recurring dreams of otherworldly creatures, mysterious alien planets and fantastic adventures.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1196 KB
  • Print Length: 309 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 146639384X
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Squidlord LLC; 1 edition (January 19, 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005Q22AI2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,212 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Universe is the Best Character February 29, 2012
By SLav
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The Trilisk Ruins is set in what feels like a fully fleshed out an imagined universe of the relatively distant future. It seems clear to me that the author has spent a great deal of time thinking about and developing the setting for this story, and that setting is compelling. Likewise, I think the author spent quite a lot of his time and effort coming up with a true alien and figuring out how he thinks/is motivated and so the alien "Shiny" is the best written character in the book.

The human characters by contrast, seem almost like afterthoughts. And like afterthoughts, they don't seem to have a fully coherent personality. They simply do things with no real motivation visible. Most of the poorer writing is around the human characters as well and I think this is as a result of the author struggling through their passages since they don't have real personalities to rely on while writing their parts. While Shiny the alien has a complete internal monologue letting us understand what his motivations are, none of the human characters has anything like that and so we are left wondering why they make they choices they do 90% of the time. It is ironic that we have a more complete look into the mind of the alien than we do into the human minds we are most prone to understand. It also leads the human reactions to seem flat. When we are told that humanity has never found an extant alien civilization, it sets us up for a universe shattering moment when our protagonists actually meet an alien. Instead, that moment is swept under the rug and just a few "I can't believe we are with an alien" comments are made, but the fact of the alien is largely accepted within moments of first contact.

That being said, the story being told is interesting and I do want to see where it goes.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Sci-Fi Story November 6, 2011
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I have never read this author's work, and I am amazed at the clarity of his vision of a future world where people's brains are interconnected through cyberspace. People in this world can send private instant messages to one another mentally, and download information. They also have to worry about viruses.

The main protagonist is a quasi-space navy brat looking to have a life of her own away from the shadow of her famous space captain father. And her act of rebellion leads her to join a private, civilian venture to find alien artifacts on a distant world, and eventually sell them on the black market to wealthy collectors.

The venture proves to be a life altering experience, and the mission takes a rather interesting turn when they encounter another alien species. The author shows fertile imagination in creating this different life form, with very unique physiology. With great difficulty and persistence, the species learn to communicate and work with one another to resolve their predicament in the Trilisk Ruins.

The Trilisk Ruins is a fantastic read for sci-fi lovers.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Story of the Complex Future October 28, 2011
By BINGO!
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Xenoartifacts would be fascinating enough without a government and its powerful space force conspiring to keep these items from the general population.
There are arguments for keeping artifacts of alien technology safe from people who might be harmed by what they don't understand, but probably the greatest motivation would be vast sums of money for uncovering new technologies.
Of course, the large corporations want to maintain their control over this process so they're counting on a system that works in their favor.
Naturally this system has developed into a police-state for the United Nations.
This story concentrates on a rogue private exploration to uncover Trilisk devices from a long-dead civilization and smuggle them to black market buyers. The Earth is one where virtual reality is taken for granted and cybernetic implants enable people to interact directly with computers that are part of almost everything and everywhere. While this is not a new concept the novel explores some of the implications of this increased capacity to interact with the world making it a very interesting read. Some of the drawbacks to connected living are also illustrated, such as the ability to eavesdrop on others, having a constant record of your experiences subject to review by authorities, and the government's ruthless conduct to prevent cheating that in turn creates back-channels of communication and commerce.
One thing that I kept wondering in this story was how could this all happen with such compliant uniformity when humans have presumably spread to many star-systems and planets.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic story teller January 4, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
McCloskey's ability to describe an environment from an alien perspective made for a great story line. Imagine a culture that communicates with entirely different senses and a really alien value set. Includes good high-tech sci fi. Overall it was a great read. Looking for more.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, but could use some work May 3, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I loved the universe, but the author fell into the novice trap of describing rather than doing. Too much narrative text. Characters need more development, they lacked that internal logic that makes them real, believable people. Nevertheless, I plan to buy the sequel when it comes out just because I really want to know what happens next!
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is not worth reading. The plot is ...
This book is not worth reading. The plot is both trivial and overused in SF. The dialog sounds might be spoken by preteen girls but not by the characters in the book.
Published 19 hours ago by John F. Phillips
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read
This is a great, action packed sci-fi adventure. Really enjoyed this and am well into the second book.
Published 1 day ago by William Fleck
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent
Great, though ended a bit abruptly, looking forward to reading the next one. Reminded me of classic sci-fi from the 70s, with modern extrapolations of where our technology is... Read more
Published 2 days ago by Richard M. Mathis
4.0 out of 5 stars Good mix
New thoughts. New aliens. a little romance because hard to believe it would not happen. and loose ends to pick up in the next book. Will read the next one to see what happens next.
Published 8 days ago by C. A. Wells
5.0 out of 5 stars ... John Campbell once said) "It has to be a good STORY to become good...
"First and foremost" (as John Campbell once said) "It has to be a good STORY to become good science fiction". The Trilisk Ruins fills that bill nicely. Read more
Published 14 days ago by Mark Price
2.0 out of 5 stars Just *okay*
The book was *okay* in that it was interesting enough for me to finish it. Probably not impressed enough to buy the next book in the series. Plot is decent. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Ward Wagher
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent work
This book was pretty good, hard scifi. The aliens are pretty alien, and the technology here is both high tech and pretty believable. Read more
Published 1 month ago by N. Bukovac
2.0 out of 5 stars The Mind's Eye
Some funny moments, a few muddled science explanations, some spelling and grammar errors.

Oh, and the author used the phrase "mind's eye" 17 times. Read more
Published 1 month ago by patiscynical
2.0 out of 5 stars The only reason why it even gets two starts is ...
The only reason why it even gets two starts is because its free so i don't have to worry about returning this back. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Roman Shalagin
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book and skillfully written
Excellent book and skillfully written. I look forward to reading the rest of this series. I highly recommend this book and this author.
Published 2 months ago by walter Mueller
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More About the Author

Michael McCloskey is a software engineer in Silicon Valley afflicted with recurring dreams of otherworldly creatures, mysterious alien planets, and fantastic adventures.

http://www.squidlord.com

You can subscribe to announcements of my new releases here:
http://eepurl.com/nExcb

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