Buy New
$24.30
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.00
  • Save: $2.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trinitarian Spirituality:... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Trinitarian Spirituality: John Owen and the Doctrine of God in Western Devotion (Studies in Christian History and Thought) Paperback – February 1, 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.30
$24.30 $23.94
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

"The Religion of Democracy: Seven Liberals and the American Moral Tradition"
Historian Amy Kittelstrom shows how religion and democracy have worked together as universal ideals in American culture. Learn more
$24.30 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Christian History and Thought
  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (February 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1556356560
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556356568
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,313,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Brian has been a pastor, an adjunct faculty member at Fuller Theological Seminary, and a lecturer in Religious Studies at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. He holds a Ph.D. in Historical Theology from the University of Bristol in the UK. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
67%
4 star
0%
3 star
33%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian G Hedges on August 11, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While Evangelicals are hungry for authentic spiritual experience, we are, it seems to me, rather confused about how to get it. This hunger is a good thing, evidenced by the many books now available on spiritual formation and the disciplines, not to mention the plethora of devotional guides now on the market. But evidence of the confusion is seen in the actual content of some this material.

On one hand, there is a focus on technique over theology. Richard Foster, whose Celebration of Disciplines in many ways pioneered three decades of literature on renewed interest in the disciplines, is a case in point. In many ways, it's a helpful book, full of practical guidance on practicing the classic disciplines. But it is so thin on theology that a Unitarian would probably find little with which to disagree in its pages.

On the other hand, even when there is theological reflection in books on spirituality, more appeal is often made to authors in the mystical and contemplative traditions than to their Evangelical and Reformed counterparts. (And this isn't a new trend. A. W. Tozer's Pursuit of God, now almost fifty-five years old, freely quotes Thomas a'Kempis, Nicolas of Cusa and the anonymous The Cloud of Unknowing.) Though I have no hard evidence for it, my suspicion is that the effect of our confused attempts to meet this hunger is something like trying to satisfy a voracious physical appetite by gorging on cotton candy - it may taste good at first, but it lacks the nourishing value of a well-balanced meal.

A partial course correction may lie in an under-noticed theological monograph on the infamously difficult-to-read Puritan theologian John Owen - Brian Kay's Trinitarian Spirituality: John Owen and the Doctrine of God in Western Devotion (Wipf & Stock, 2008).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nate Claiborne on February 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
In Trinitarian Spirituality, we have an in depth examination of the devotional model in his Communion With the Triune God. After an introductory chapter setting the stage, author Brian Kay dives right in to a discussion of the historical roots of the divorce of spirituality and theology. In short, many devotional models that claim to be distinctly Christian are not sufficiently rooted in a Trinitarian doctrine of God. For these models, were the Trinity proved to be an invalid doctrine, they could proceed more or less unaffected.

Part of the problem for these models is that "both theology and spirituality [tend] to operate as overly distinct disciplines that can be pursued without reference to one another" (p. 11). While that is perhaps a larger problem concerning a lack of communication between the two disciplines, a more specific issue with the deficient models is that they aren't rooted the the work of God in the divine drama of redemption:

Models of spirituality that are not trinitarian in these ways fail to be specific or concrete enough to inspire sustained interest and tend toward, at best, boredom, whereas the trinitarian history of salvation is compelling drama, a true story that while executed in history, has the believer's transformation as part of its goal and can thus sustain the believer with rich content for prayer and mediation (p. 15-16).

In chapter 3 then, the search begins for a viable model of Trinitarian spirituality. There, Kay poses two criteria (p. 30):

Given the "Great Tradition" of the relatively stable doctrine of the Trinity, Christian spiritualities can be evaluated by how well they comport with this doctrinal tradition, or even better, to what extent they explicitly draw from it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Ross on December 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
I am teaching a course on Trinitarianism, where one of the assigned texts is John Owen's Communion with God the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, and so I thought I would read Kay's book to assist my understanding of Owen. Positively, he helps one understand Owen. He is usually correct in his analysis of what that famous Puritan was saying, although I am not convinced that he is always accurate in his assessment. Negatively, he cites without any caution unconverted theological liberals such as Barth and the feminist Catherine M. LaCugna. Speaking of feminism, Kelly rejects English grammar for feminism by making "she" the generic pronoun, which is irritating, disconcerting, and unbiblical (as the masculine pronouns are the generic ones in the Greek and Hebrew texts God has given us by verbal, plenary inspiration, and Adam, not Eve, was the representative of the race.) There are also a variety of typograpical errors, although those cannot entirely be avoided.

The combination of the positive features breaking down Owen and the negatives described above lead me to assign three stars to the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Trinitarian Spirituality: John Owen and the Doctrine of God in Western Devotion (Studies in Christian History and Thought)
This item: Trinitarian Spirituality: John Owen and the Doctrine of God in Western Devotion (Studies in Christian History and Thought)
Price: $27.00 $24.30
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com