Tripping the Prom Queen: The Truth About Women and Rivalry and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.99
  • Save: $4.78 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Tripping the Prom Queen: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Tripping the Prom Queen: The Truth About Women and Rivalry Paperback – March 6, 2007


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.21
$7.49 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Tripping the Prom Queen: The Truth About Women and Rivalry + Woman's Inhumanity to Woman + In the Company of Women: Indirect Aggression Among Women:  Why We Hurt Each Other and How to Stop
Price for all three: $44.93

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition edition (March 6, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 031233432X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312334321
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #879,768 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Frasier is one of the most talented readers of nonfiction audio books (it wasn't a simple matter to make a book like Mary Roach's Stiff both edifying and wry, but Frasier pulled it off wonderfully). Frasier delivers the text at a brisk clip, just quick enough to hold the audience's interest through Barash's repetitive text, but clearly enough to enunciate every word. Moreover, Frasier individualizes the voices of research respondents, 500 heterosexual women interviewed about competitive relationships with other women, putting a human face on Barash's conclusions. Barash has a gift for innuendo: the respondents come across as reluctant, shy, angry, bitter or matter-of-fact. Although these women appear only briefly, Frasier manages to convey more than the printed text might. It's an easier task to read a brilliant book than one like Barash, which lags at times. Kudos to Frasier's fine job with a book that is an important addition to women's and cultural studies but lacks narrative sparkle. Simultaneous release with the St. Martin's hardcover (Reviews, Dec. 12, 2005).
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From Booklist

Gender-issues expert Barash finds that women's solidarity with one another is mythical in this in-depth treatment of female rivalry, a subject she recognized in previous books but never before focused on in "a study that would show both the external pressures and the internal dynamics that led to envy, jealousy and competition." Insufficient options are the root cause of women's rivalry, she contends, arguing that society's limiting, narrowly defined roles for women create a situation in which there isn't enough to go around; hence, competition. Ironically, her study of 500 heterosexual women of varied ages, races, and backgrounds found that rivalry intensified as women moved from 1950s domesticity to the twenty-first-century's expanded options. Pressure to hide such rivalry has grown, too, and is a key to understanding women's urge to outdo each other conclusively, since the combination of concealment and competition is exhausting, especially for those who came of age during the passionate perihelion of -sisterhood-is-powerful ideology. Whitney Scott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Pay attention at work.
BooksJJS
This is not the the "truth" about women.
T. Traster
Well, am I glad I came across this book.
Reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Wanda B. Red VINE VOICE on May 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
On the plus side, this is an eye-opening book. The human animal is by nature, I guess, a pretty envious creature -- and when overt competitiveness is frowned upon (as it is for women generally), the spirit of competition can find some ugly outlets. Much of this book is composed of quotations from the 500 interviews that Barash conducted; these mini-stories dramatize how close to the surface female envy and insecurity lie. I hadn't quite realized all of this, or perhaps I should say I hadn't wanted to know it. Once Barash lays out the evidence as to how hard we women compete and how devious we can be, well there it is!

On the other hand, the book is a bit long on story-telling and short on analysis. Especially bothersome, to me at least, is the author's failure to distinguish fully the evidence and anecdotes that she gleans from TV and the movies from her real-life interviews. Interleaved with factual material are vignettes taken from Roseanne, Sex and the City, Friends, Desperate Housewives, and so forth. For example, just after describing competitiveness between women in the medical profession (and with hardly a pause), Barash suddenly launches into a recap of an episode she saw on E.R.: "a young nurse living with a doctor feels envious of an attractive resident who develops a crush on the same man..."

Hello! Not real people! You'd think that someone who is a "professor of critical thinking..." (see book flap) might provide a little more in the way of distancing and questioning than the introductory "Although the E.R. writers try to create happy endings for women" (167).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By DeeAnne on April 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover
After encountering one of the worst situations regarding women in the workplace a few weeks ago this couldn't have come at a more perfect time. I first saw Diane Sawyer from Good Morning America talking about it and immediately went online and ordered it. I read it cover to cover however it would have been more helpful if more solutions were offered in the different situations. Even though the author covers solutions the majority of the book is focused on confirming what most of us know when it comes to jealousy, rivalry, and envy. However it doesn't hurt to see it in print - a real reality check. If all females would read this then maybe we could start correcting the problems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By anon on March 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Finally a book that blows the cover on what women really do to one another and how to face the reality. Barash shows us all the ways in which women rival one another, while they pretend they're not the least bit envious or competitive. I found the book both revealing and honest--I admit I saw myself and my friends in some of her interviewee's stories. The last third of the book shows us ways to make things better and this was quite useful. A delightful read about a subject no one has touched yet.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Penny Light on August 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I loved this book. While she says in the introductory that the book is an exposure of the behavior and not a self-help solution, it would have been nice to have more solutions.

Exposing the behavior was GREAT! I learned so much about my own behavior and that of the people with whom I work. It helped me to ask some better questions concerning my own behavior toward other people and it opened up some great dialogue in our office!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Dellasega on March 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Ms. Shapiro Barash's witty approach to the serious topic of female rivalry manages to be both entertaining and informative. Without minimizing the issues, she describes how "Snow Queens and Soccer Moms" spar over their children and "Perpetual Beauty Contests" last a lifetime. But her strategies for overcoming the relationally aggressive behaviors driven by competition and jealousy are what may help readers most. They should be part of every girl's middle school--or perhaps elementary--education.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BooksJJS on January 10, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first read this book in print a few years ago then bought the Kindle version. It's a powerful work telling powerful truth. I am an avid supporter of women, served two years as president of my corporations women's network, support younger women on the way up, and participate as much as I can in events focused on women's success. What is always lacking in the organizations is the TRUTH that women can hurt each other more than men do. The men just watch it happen. As long as we are busy trampling on or holding each other back, they won't have to worry about us. Pay attention at work. If it's happening to you, speak up, change friends, change jobs. If you are guilty, stop it and realize there can only be room for all of us is WE make room. I just had a situation at work where two women who I thought fully supported me for a promotion actively worked to ensure a much younger, far less qualified male got the position. This is support? Give me a spork in the eye instead, please.

On a more personal note, I first read this book after a "friend" made a serious play for the man who is now my husband. We were in a rough patch, yes, and he was being stupid by responding at all, yes. But what I could not grasp was how SHE could do such a thing. Then, in this book, I read that there are women who want what you have... not because they TRULY want it (or him)... rather, simply because you have it and they do not. Suddenly it was clear... she'd wanted to meet every man I dated before I met my husband. That all clicked after I read this book. She is no longer my friend. He is still my husband... who won? I lost a "friend", trust was damaged, and I regard women with less trust than ever when it comes to my man. I know there are many of you to whom this has happened...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews