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Triumph of Order: Democracy and Public Space in New York and London (Columbia History of Urban Life) Hardcover – November 25, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0231146722 ISBN-10: 0231146728

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Product Details

  • Series: Columbia History of Urban Life
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (November 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231146728
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231146722
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,135,081 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Triumph of Order offers smart insights into how a city defines quality of life.

(Sam Roberts New York Times)

Triumph of Order is the all-too-rare scholarly book that, being so well written, is fully accessible to the proverbial general reader.

(Howard P. Segal Times Higher Education Supplement)

Lisa Keller's meticulously researched book invites consideration of a range of issues concerning the urban environment and the politics of public health that will be of interest beyond her major audience of political historians.

(Samantha MacBride H-Urban)

Detailed and illuminating.... Throughout her study, Keller compares the historical evidence to twenty-first-century events and compellingly demonstrates how nineteenth-century antecedents have contributed to modern-day perspectives and positions. This brings a refreshing sense of relevance and significance, which is so often lacking from historical studies.

(Journal of American Studies)

The value of this book lies in its excellent detailed case studies of the management of particular public events.

(Victorian Studies 1900-01-00)

Review

Lisa Keller's landmark study of public protest and public order in nineteenth-century London and New York is an outstanding piece of comparative history; it is also full of stimulating and sobering insights into the challenges and constraints of big-city living in our own day.

(David Cannadine, Institute of Historical Research, University of London, and author of The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Yakas on November 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In a half century of reading and writing history book reviews I have never encountered a more mean-spirited, ahistorical, and misinformed review than the one posted by the previous reviewer. Obviously everyone is entitled to an opinion but this reveals more about the commentator than the book. Suffice to say, I edited the manuscript, it won two important prizes for excellence, it is in paperback, and it is widely used in college courses. An outstanding piece of scholarship based on extensive archival research, it presents an unusual and pervasive argument that informs us about both the past and the future. I suggest that readers judge for themselves.
Kenneth T. Jackson
Barzun Professor of History
Columbia University
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amber on April 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
Lisa Keller is a joke of a human being and the fact that this was even published was an egregious oversight. Don't even consider reading or buying this book. If you've made the mistake of ordering it, burn it.
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2 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Reader on October 5, 2012
Format: Unknown Binding Verified Purchase
Errors contained within Lisa Keller's Triumph of Order are way beyond the acceptable limit for any piece of scholarly writing.

"The Triumph of Order, Democracy and Public Spaces in New York and London" is a simplistic good-guys-triumph-over-bad-guys narrative. Nuance does not exist for this author. Moronic is a word that popped into my mind as I read though the text.

There's no primary research, and the text is riddled with errors. Using a limited number of books on my bookshelves I found dozens of inaccurate notations unconnected to sources cited. Some comically so. Keller dumps lists of things in text & in her all too frequently inaccurate footnotes. Add to that the absence of pagination for newspaper citations & headers for articles quoted in the book. . Newspapers are by and large given equal editorial weight by Keller. The Press is represented as monolithic. There's nothing about corporate ownership of newspapers or their dependence on retail advertising for revenue. This book is a history lover's nightmare. Parties responsible for printing this gibberish should be ashamed of themselves.

Hard to say whether what Keller's written about London in the 19th Century is more incorrect than what she's written about NYC in the same period. Keller skips back & forth between London & New York City w/o rythmn or reason. No chronology.

Regarding NYC:
Edgar Allen Poe's 1844 comments about the Philadelphia police department are misrepresented by Keller as being about the New York City police of the same era. (p.51). The article's mention of the city of brotherly love should have been a tip off. On page 35 Keller mangles Edgar Allen Poe's words musings about Manhattan. Poe saw a certain beauty in the shanties in Central Park.
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