Engineering & Transportation
Buy New
$20.06
Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.95
  • Save: $3.89 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Triumphant Capitalism: Henry Clay Frick and the Industrial Transformation of America (History/Business History) Paperback – June 24, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.06
$19.50 $21.75


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: History/Business History
  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press; 1 edition (June 24, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822957442
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822957447
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,630,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Henry Clay Frick parlayed his success in the coke industry into a leading role for himself in America's expanding steel industry at the close of the 19th century. He was a close associate of Andrew Carnegie and was often depicted as the "bad cop" to Carnegie's "good cop" during the era's labor struggles, notably the Homestead Strike of 1892. Warren, an Oxford don, calls this work an "industrial biography," a kind of life-and-times book with a business focus. It is almost impossible to write a readable book about the financial involutions of the steel industry, and Warren does not overcome the difficulties. Though his arid work will attract few general readers, its research value makes it welcome in academic libraries with interests in industrial and Pennsylvania history.?Fritz Buckallew, Univ. of Central Oklahoma Lib., Edmond
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Warren provides a detailed chronological account of the business career of Henry Clay Frick, one of the leading entrepreneurs in American heavy industry during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. . . . This is a useful and thorough study which will be a helpful source for business historians and there is much to be gleaned about the changing nature of the coal, iron and steel trades.”
--Business History

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Henry Clay Frick {HCF} is perhaps the most extreme individual representation of late 19th and early 20th century American capitalism at its zenith - ruthless, innovative, intense and relentlessly successfull. And for these very reasons he often does not play well to 21st century contemporary academics and the current liberal "anti - capitalist establishment". H.C. Frick was a businessman playing by the rules of his era and in reading this well written and informative biography of his business career one has to be conscious of this fact and not {necessarily} to judge him by standards of 2012.

Born in 1849 in modest circumstances at the dawn of America's industrial age he followed the pattern of C.Vanderbilt, A.Carnegie, J.D.Rockefeller and H.Ford - poor farm boys who by their ambition, vision, intelligence, an indefatigable work ethic and "guts" built managerial and technologically advanced industrial organizations from scratch that would employ hundreds of thousands of people and would play a huge role in making the U.S.A. the premier industrial nation of the 20th century. That HCF was an unique man is beyond question and his talent and characther was apparent to his contemporaries from very early on. Certainly it was evident to Thomas Mellon of the Pittsburg based Mellon Bank {"a very hard man with a dollar"} for when Frick approached him to borrow money for expansion of the H.C. Frick Coke Company, Mr. Mellon was so impressed with the 25 year old Frick that not only did he give him the requested financing, Mellon also included an option for Frick to be be able to borrow more money as needed !! This started a lifetime association with the Mellons and HCF's closest friend would be Andrew Mellon the future U.S secretary of the treasury from 1921-1932.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 7, 1998
Format: Hardcover
While this book is full of well researched information, the author seemed to forget that it also must be read and enjoyed. While the statistics included displayed knowledge on the part of the author, they made it extremely difficult to follow without reading each page over more than once. This book is a good source for further research, but not something to read casually.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Doug_Richardson@nps.gov on November 2, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Kenneth Warren managed to succeed where Samuel Schreiner seemed to fall flat. Henry Clay Frick was a man of many contradictions. Very insightful and well-written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Allegrippus on December 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Intriguing account of Frick's business career. His partner Andrew Carnegie figures as much in the tale as does Frick. According to the author, the purpose for the formation of U.S. Steel Corp. was not to assemble an unassailable predatory conglomerate, but to eliminate the dominant, competitive Carnegie and his aggressive squeezing out of all inefficiency in his plants from the steel industry. Elbert Gary, the lawyer chosen by the patrician international financier J.P. Morgan to oversee the new corporation, and head of one of the constituent steelmakers that competed with Carnegie, was opposed to running up the score. His mission was to encourage competing steel firms to flourish in the benign shade of U.S. Steel and its tariff fortification.

Not wishing to attract the wrath of trust-busters, the new corporation hobbled itself by acceding over time to cost-prohibitive labor-union work rules and wages rather than following Carnegie's unwavering insistence on capital reinvestment in cutting-edge manufacturing improvements. Carnegie had only his few like-minded partners to answer to, whereas U.S. Steel had a disparate array of shareholders and other financial backers. The result was constantly diminishing market share leading to the hollowed-out steel firm on display today once costly regulations had their effect and the tariff supports were knocked out from underneath it. U.S. Steel always seemed to take the lead in labor negotiations which affected the entire industry. Ironically most of its old-line protected hothouse competitors, unable to weather the same adverse conditions, have gone out of business completely. The outsized U.S. Steel remained something of a public whipping boy despite its restrained behavior.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Allan Lindner on September 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is "OK" but could have been much better. A substantial part of it has you paging ahead and thinking "When is this going to end?" especially the section dealing with the many market sharing and price fixing arrangements the Carnegie companies entered into with other companies over the late 19th century. It is often not chronological which doesn't help. The index is pretty bare bones and often doesn't contain the names of the many characters who appear throughout in case you need to place them again. It does describe the roles Frick and other principals played and has many tables but overall could have been better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?