Trombone Shorty

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Biography

Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews' is a rare artist who can draw both the unqualified respect of jazz legends and deliver a high-energy rock show capable of mesmerizing international rock stars and audiences alike. With such an unprecedented mix of rock, funk, jazz, hip-hop and soul, he had to create his own name to describe his signature sound: Supafunkrock! Andrews is the kind of player who comes along maybe once in a generation, and Backatown is the latest, clearest proof that his artistry is as singular as his raw talent.

Equally adept on trombone and trumpet, Andrews plays a variety of ... Read more

Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews' is a rare artist who can draw both the unqualified respect of jazz legends and deliver a high-energy rock show capable of mesmerizing international rock stars and audiences alike. With such an unprecedented mix of rock, funk, jazz, hip-hop and soul, he had to create his own name to describe his signature sound: Supafunkrock! Andrews is the kind of player who comes along maybe once in a generation, and Backatown is the latest, clearest proof that his artistry is as singular as his raw talent.

Equally adept on trombone and trumpet, Andrews plays a variety of other instruments as well. He’s applied the same skill sets and fierce discipline to his vocal instrument, to soulful effect, as the album demonstrates. Surrounding Andrews is his band, Orleans Avenue—Mike Ballard on bass, Pete Murano on guitar, Joey Peebles on drums, Dwayne Williams on percussion and Dan Oestreicher on baritone sax—virtuosos every one.

“In our band we have people from different cultural backgrounds who listen to all kinds of different styles,” Andrews explains, “and when we get into our studio in New Orleans—we call it the Gumbo Room—we throw it all in and see how we can make it work as one thing, so that it’s not so left-field. We just try to make everything fit, you know, and I think that had a major effect on the record. We just banged a bunch of things out to see how they could work. We weren’t afraid to approach a bunch of different musical styles—rock music, R&B, whatever—just because there’s a horn in front. We just did what we do, and over time we developed something fresh. Making this record was a learning experience for us because, for the earlier records, we did them in like three days; this time we stayed in there for months in between tour dates, writing, picking things apart and reconstructing them. Ben knew what we needed to do, so we just followed his lead and he got it out of us.”

Exemplifying the diverse backgrounds of the players, Murano cut his teeth on rock guitar before becoming swept up in jazz while attending Loyola, and he brings it all to bear on the band’s genre-obliterating music, alternating between sweet soul, driving funk grooves and rock riffage.

“Pete knows I love power chords, and if I could play them on my trombone, I’d do it all day,” says Troy, who’s wildly eclectic in his tastes, in stark contrast to many of his fellow jazz-trained virtuosos. “Jazz musicians can be close-minded,” he says, “and I didn’t want to be one of those musicians that kept recycling things that had been done already, because then I wouldn’t be able to grow. The sound of the group just developed naturally out of everybody’s personal taste. Coming from the Tremé, all I knew was fun music and dancing, so I wanted to be able to get back to that with this band and take it to another level. I always wanted to play in front of my peers, and to do something that would keep me interested as well as keeping the audience interested.”

When Katrina hit New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2006, Andrews was on tour with Lenny Kravitz. “I was on a break at that time, so I was able to help my family get out before going back on tour for another year or so,” he recalls. “Half of the guys in the band were still in college, and when I got back everybody was done with school, so we were able to take this thing on the road. I couldn’t have been in a better situation than to be with someone of Lenny’s caliber at that point in my career.”

As for how he got this prestigious gig, Troy says, “We had a mutual friend in New Orleans named Sidney Torres, and Lenny called him to say he was looking for some new horn players. Sydney said, ‘I have this kid who’s 18.’ Lenny said, ‘I’m lookin’ for somebody with soul—how can an 18-year-old kid have soul?’ But Sydney convinced him to fly me to Miami, I played for him and he kept me there. He said, ‘You’re in the band, and you’ve gotta work your butt off.’ So I had to learn like 20 years of music. To be able to play in that band and gain so much knowledge was huge. My sister told me that me playing with that band was like Kobe Bryant going straight from high school to the pros.

“It was a mind-opening experience,” he says of playing with Kravitz and his band, “because coming from jazz I was doing a lot of improvising, and with him I learned to play songs just like the record, which you need great discipline for. When I brought that discipline back to the band, everything took off from there. Also, from seeing my idol control 15-16,000 people every night in arenas, I was able to take that approach and apply it to my own performances.”

Kravitz clearly had his head turned by the youngster’s rare gift, recently lauding him again as “a genius player. He’s got nothing but personality."

Andrews started early, learning how to play drums and what he remembers as “the world’s smallest trumpet” at the age of three. By the time he reached six, this prodigy was playing trumpet and trombone in a jazz band led by his older brother James, himself a trumpet player of local renown who has been called “Satchmo of the Ghetto.” Not long afterward, Troy formed his own band with some other musically inclined kids from Tremé, including current bandmate Williams, and they became regulars at Jackson Square, playing for spare change and pulling in as much as $400 apiece on a particularly hopping weekend. During a visit to a small New Orleans club, Bono and the Edge happened upon the trombone player, who was then 12. “We walked in and the place was jumping,” the Edge recalled. “There was this little funk band, but they were all playing brass instruments, which is something I’d never heard of or seen before. We were just mesmerized by him. I ended up with Bono, after a few tequilas, dancing with a bunch of girls on the top of the bar. It was one of those sort of nights.”

Troy’s rarefied talents and immense promise inspired the organizers of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival to pick him as the subject of the fest’s annual Congo Square official poster. In 2009, at 23, he became the youngest artist ever to be pictured on a poster—the next youngest was Wynton Marsalis, who was featured at age 41. Said Marsalis of Andrews, “Shorty possesses the rarest combination of talent, technical capability and down-home soul. I’m his biggest fan.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews' is a rare artist who can draw both the unqualified respect of jazz legends and deliver a high-energy rock show capable of mesmerizing international rock stars and audiences alike. With such an unprecedented mix of rock, funk, jazz, hip-hop and soul, he had to create his own name to describe his signature sound: Supafunkrock! Andrews is the kind of player who comes along maybe once in a generation, and Backatown is the latest, clearest proof that his artistry is as singular as his raw talent.

Equally adept on trombone and trumpet, Andrews plays a variety of other instruments as well. He’s applied the same skill sets and fierce discipline to his vocal instrument, to soulful effect, as the album demonstrates. Surrounding Andrews is his band, Orleans Avenue—Mike Ballard on bass, Pete Murano on guitar, Joey Peebles on drums, Dwayne Williams on percussion and Dan Oestreicher on baritone sax—virtuosos every one.

“In our band we have people from different cultural backgrounds who listen to all kinds of different styles,” Andrews explains, “and when we get into our studio in New Orleans—we call it the Gumbo Room—we throw it all in and see how we can make it work as one thing, so that it’s not so left-field. We just try to make everything fit, you know, and I think that had a major effect on the record. We just banged a bunch of things out to see how they could work. We weren’t afraid to approach a bunch of different musical styles—rock music, R&B, whatever—just because there’s a horn in front. We just did what we do, and over time we developed something fresh. Making this record was a learning experience for us because, for the earlier records, we did them in like three days; this time we stayed in there for months in between tour dates, writing, picking things apart and reconstructing them. Ben knew what we needed to do, so we just followed his lead and he got it out of us.”

Exemplifying the diverse backgrounds of the players, Murano cut his teeth on rock guitar before becoming swept up in jazz while attending Loyola, and he brings it all to bear on the band’s genre-obliterating music, alternating between sweet soul, driving funk grooves and rock riffage.

“Pete knows I love power chords, and if I could play them on my trombone, I’d do it all day,” says Troy, who’s wildly eclectic in his tastes, in stark contrast to many of his fellow jazz-trained virtuosos. “Jazz musicians can be close-minded,” he says, “and I didn’t want to be one of those musicians that kept recycling things that had been done already, because then I wouldn’t be able to grow. The sound of the group just developed naturally out of everybody’s personal taste. Coming from the Tremé, all I knew was fun music and dancing, so I wanted to be able to get back to that with this band and take it to another level. I always wanted to play in front of my peers, and to do something that would keep me interested as well as keeping the audience interested.”

When Katrina hit New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2006, Andrews was on tour with Lenny Kravitz. “I was on a break at that time, so I was able to help my family get out before going back on tour for another year or so,” he recalls. “Half of the guys in the band were still in college, and when I got back everybody was done with school, so we were able to take this thing on the road. I couldn’t have been in a better situation than to be with someone of Lenny’s caliber at that point in my career.”

As for how he got this prestigious gig, Troy says, “We had a mutual friend in New Orleans named Sidney Torres, and Lenny called him to say he was looking for some new horn players. Sydney said, ‘I have this kid who’s 18.’ Lenny said, ‘I’m lookin’ for somebody with soul—how can an 18-year-old kid have soul?’ But Sydney convinced him to fly me to Miami, I played for him and he kept me there. He said, ‘You’re in the band, and you’ve gotta work your butt off.’ So I had to learn like 20 years of music. To be able to play in that band and gain so much knowledge was huge. My sister told me that me playing with that band was like Kobe Bryant going straight from high school to the pros.

“It was a mind-opening experience,” he says of playing with Kravitz and his band, “because coming from jazz I was doing a lot of improvising, and with him I learned to play songs just like the record, which you need great discipline for. When I brought that discipline back to the band, everything took off from there. Also, from seeing my idol control 15-16,000 people every night in arenas, I was able to take that approach and apply it to my own performances.”

Kravitz clearly had his head turned by the youngster’s rare gift, recently lauding him again as “a genius player. He’s got nothing but personality."

Andrews started early, learning how to play drums and what he remembers as “the world’s smallest trumpet” at the age of three. By the time he reached six, this prodigy was playing trumpet and trombone in a jazz band led by his older brother James, himself a trumpet player of local renown who has been called “Satchmo of the Ghetto.” Not long afterward, Troy formed his own band with some other musically inclined kids from Tremé, including current bandmate Williams, and they became regulars at Jackson Square, playing for spare change and pulling in as much as $400 apiece on a particularly hopping weekend. During a visit to a small New Orleans club, Bono and the Edge happened upon the trombone player, who was then 12. “We walked in and the place was jumping,” the Edge recalled. “There was this little funk band, but they were all playing brass instruments, which is something I’d never heard of or seen before. We were just mesmerized by him. I ended up with Bono, after a few tequilas, dancing with a bunch of girls on the top of the bar. It was one of those sort of nights.”

Troy’s rarefied talents and immense promise inspired the organizers of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival to pick him as the subject of the fest’s annual Congo Square official poster. In 2009, at 23, he became the youngest artist ever to be pictured on a poster—the next youngest was Wynton Marsalis, who was featured at age 41. Said Marsalis of Andrews, “Shorty possesses the rarest combination of talent, technical capability and down-home soul. I’m his biggest fan.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews' is a rare artist who can draw both the unqualified respect of jazz legends and deliver a high-energy rock show capable of mesmerizing international rock stars and audiences alike. With such an unprecedented mix of rock, funk, jazz, hip-hop and soul, he had to create his own name to describe his signature sound: Supafunkrock! Andrews is the kind of player who comes along maybe once in a generation, and Backatown is the latest, clearest proof that his artistry is as singular as his raw talent.

Equally adept on trombone and trumpet, Andrews plays a variety of other instruments as well. He’s applied the same skill sets and fierce discipline to his vocal instrument, to soulful effect, as the album demonstrates. Surrounding Andrews is his band, Orleans Avenue—Mike Ballard on bass, Pete Murano on guitar, Joey Peebles on drums, Dwayne Williams on percussion and Dan Oestreicher on baritone sax—virtuosos every one.

“In our band we have people from different cultural backgrounds who listen to all kinds of different styles,” Andrews explains, “and when we get into our studio in New Orleans—we call it the Gumbo Room—we throw it all in and see how we can make it work as one thing, so that it’s not so left-field. We just try to make everything fit, you know, and I think that had a major effect on the record. We just banged a bunch of things out to see how they could work. We weren’t afraid to approach a bunch of different musical styles—rock music, R&B, whatever—just because there’s a horn in front. We just did what we do, and over time we developed something fresh. Making this record was a learning experience for us because, for the earlier records, we did them in like three days; this time we stayed in there for months in between tour dates, writing, picking things apart and reconstructing them. Ben knew what we needed to do, so we just followed his lead and he got it out of us.”

Exemplifying the diverse backgrounds of the players, Murano cut his teeth on rock guitar before becoming swept up in jazz while attending Loyola, and he brings it all to bear on the band’s genre-obliterating music, alternating between sweet soul, driving funk grooves and rock riffage.

“Pete knows I love power chords, and if I could play them on my trombone, I’d do it all day,” says Troy, who’s wildly eclectic in his tastes, in stark contrast to many of his fellow jazz-trained virtuosos. “Jazz musicians can be close-minded,” he says, “and I didn’t want to be one of those musicians that kept recycling things that had been done already, because then I wouldn’t be able to grow. The sound of the group just developed naturally out of everybody’s personal taste. Coming from the Tremé, all I knew was fun music and dancing, so I wanted to be able to get back to that with this band and take it to another level. I always wanted to play in front of my peers, and to do something that would keep me interested as well as keeping the audience interested.”

When Katrina hit New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2006, Andrews was on tour with Lenny Kravitz. “I was on a break at that time, so I was able to help my family get out before going back on tour for another year or so,” he recalls. “Half of the guys in the band were still in college, and when I got back everybody was done with school, so we were able to take this thing on the road. I couldn’t have been in a better situation than to be with someone of Lenny’s caliber at that point in my career.”

As for how he got this prestigious gig, Troy says, “We had a mutual friend in New Orleans named Sidney Torres, and Lenny called him to say he was looking for some new horn players. Sydney said, ‘I have this kid who’s 18.’ Lenny said, ‘I’m lookin’ for somebody with soul—how can an 18-year-old kid have soul?’ But Sydney convinced him to fly me to Miami, I played for him and he kept me there. He said, ‘You’re in the band, and you’ve gotta work your butt off.’ So I had to learn like 20 years of music. To be able to play in that band and gain so much knowledge was huge. My sister told me that me playing with that band was like Kobe Bryant going straight from high school to the pros.

“It was a mind-opening experience,” he says of playing with Kravitz and his band, “because coming from jazz I was doing a lot of improvising, and with him I learned to play songs just like the record, which you need great discipline for. When I brought that discipline back to the band, everything took off from there. Also, from seeing my idol control 15-16,000 people every night in arenas, I was able to take that approach and apply it to my own performances.”

Kravitz clearly had his head turned by the youngster’s rare gift, recently lauding him again as “a genius player. He’s got nothing but personality."

Andrews started early, learning how to play drums and what he remembers as “the world’s smallest trumpet” at the age of three. By the time he reached six, this prodigy was playing trumpet and trombone in a jazz band led by his older brother James, himself a trumpet player of local renown who has been called “Satchmo of the Ghetto.” Not long afterward, Troy formed his own band with some other musically inclined kids from Tremé, including current bandmate Williams, and they became regulars at Jackson Square, playing for spare change and pulling in as much as $400 apiece on a particularly hopping weekend. During a visit to a small New Orleans club, Bono and the Edge happened upon the trombone player, who was then 12. “We walked in and the place was jumping,” the Edge recalled. “There was this little funk band, but they were all playing brass instruments, which is something I’d never heard of or seen before. We were just mesmerized by him. I ended up with Bono, after a few tequilas, dancing with a bunch of girls on the top of the bar. It was one of those sort of nights.”

Troy’s rarefied talents and immense promise inspired the organizers of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival to pick him as the subject of the fest’s annual Congo Square official poster. In 2009, at 23, he became the youngest artist ever to be pictured on a poster—the next youngest was Wynton Marsalis, who was featured at age 41. Said Marsalis of Andrews, “Shorty possesses the rarest combination of talent, technical capability and down-home soul. I’m his biggest fan.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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