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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The best and final Pixies
I've been listening to the Pixies since I was 12. They'll always be one of the best rock bands ever. Yes, "Come on Pilgrim" is the first release, and the rawest. Yes, "Doolittle" is probably considered the best Pixies album to date. "Bossanova" just rocks. Then, we have the final act.
"Trompe Le Monde" is a venture into a more produced, more "sci-fi" sound (Frank...
Published on December 1, 2003 by E. Bartoszak

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars With Frank Black dominating the songwriting, there's little of the balance of previous Pixies albums
TROMPE LE MONDE was the Pixies' last album. Released in 1991, it sees the band on the verge of breakup and Kim Deal contributed significantly less to the songwriting than on previous efforts. That essentially means Frank Black's idiosyncratic visions hog the spotlight. From the first three tracks on the album, "Trompe le Monde", "Planet of Sound" and "Alec Eiffel", one...
Published on October 5, 2011 by Christopher Culver


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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The best and final Pixies, December 1, 2003
By 
E. Bartoszak "Media Geek" (murrell's inlet, sc United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
I've been listening to the Pixies since I was 12. They'll always be one of the best rock bands ever. Yes, "Come on Pilgrim" is the first release, and the rawest. Yes, "Doolittle" is probably considered the best Pixies album to date. "Bossanova" just rocks. Then, we have the final act.
"Trompe Le Monde" is a venture into a more produced, more "sci-fi" sound (Frank also took the sci-fi with him for his first 2 solo releases). It is frankly, for me, the best Pixies, or Frank Black writing ever released.
This album is worth the money alone for the track "Letter to Memphis". If you've only got one Pixies album so far, this should be the next.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into the Mountain, May 12, 2004
By 
G. Preston (Baltimore, MD United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
I'll defy conventional wisdom right here by saying that each Pixies album was better than the one before. This, being the last, was the best in my opinion. For a band known for constant innovation, here they really pushed the boundaries of the rock song as far as they (or FB, if you really believe that this was "his" album) could. In a way, "Doolittle" was the pinnacle of the Pixies sound, so I can understand the praise heaped upon it. How could they possibly improve upon perfection? Well, they didn't- they just continued the progression of their sound. Things were toned down a bit for "Bossanova" (more subdued but equally enthralling) and then turned back up for this! On the first couple listens it might sound like endless screaming, and metallic guitar tones, chugging away in a thousand different directions. But underneath this abrasive surface, one will eventually notice sharp hooks around every corner, and extremely inventive and complex melodies. Highlights include "Alec Eiffel", "Palace Of the Brine" and "Subbacultcha" but really it's best listened to as a whole. The relentless pace of the album is frequently peppered with absolutely sublime moments, making it a unique and rewarding listening experience. Pehaps it's greatest achievement is it's unholy marriage of "riff-oriented" song structures that give way to more fluid and sprawling melodic refrains that get stuck in your head for.... well, forever. "Surfer Rosa" and "Doolittle" may be the undisputed masterpeices, but "Trompe Le Monde" stands alone as their most difficult and audacious creation.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Swan Song Not in Vain, March 16, 2001
By 
"saeder_krupp@hotmail.com" (Aliquippa, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Please...humor me...why do so many Pixies fans malign this album? When I first heard it (on a mix tape), I was not too impressed. 3 years later, I consider this their finest work.
Though Trompe Le Monde lacks the Albini-culled bombast of Surfer Rosa, and even the albums that followed (Doolittle and Bossanova, for those keeping score), that actually benefits this album in the long run. Describing the record as "mature" and "spastic" seems only fitting. So many moments stand out, I can't name them all. The outro of "Alec Eiffel" (which is probably one of the most haunting parts I've ever heard). The majesty of "Bird Dream of the Olympus Mons." The absolute beauty and power of "Letter to Memphis," which is probably the most straightforward love song Frank has ever penned. The pure shredding of Joey and Frank (and Kim) in the beginning of "Space (I Believe In)." "Motorway to Roswell" as a whole. Wow.
Good album, folks. Really. I can see how some may knock on it because Kim Deal didn't contribute much (which may be good or bad, depending on how you view her importance). Still, Trompe Le Monde was more than a final album for the Pixies. Loud, yet sublime. Frightening, yet peaceful. The contrasts could go on. If you're clutching your copy of Surfer Rosa, praising it for all its worth...try spinning Trompe Le Monde again...you may be surprised.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a life that's so sublime, June 20, 2004
By 
TM (Milwaukee, WI) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Are you squeamish? If one glance at the eyeballs on the cover of this record makes your stomach a bit nervous, then perhaps Trompe Le Monde isn't the safest place for you to swim.
The Pixies are perhaps best known for their excellent dance-punk-pop-grunge record Doolittle. The album's anthem, Debaser, and the poppier, happy-go-lucky-seeming Here Comes Your Man quickly win even the reluctant newcomers over. In terms of the Pixies' catalogue, Doolittle is easy listening. If Doolittle is the suburbs (which is a stretch, and no offense meant as I have only the most intense, burining respect for the Pixies cataloge as a whole) then Trompe Le Monde is just north of downtown, where most of the cars are pieced together with duct tape and nobody will walk at night. Things are just as messed up (well, perhaps a bit more messed up), but downtown they don't gloss it over. They don't cut their lawns, and uncollected newspapers rot in the bushes. Things are a little harder to look at here.
The first song, the title track, is very indicative of the record's sound and lyrics. On preliminary listens, the snippets of lyrics that can be easily discerned seem ridiculous ("go little record go/it is named by/some guy named joe). But what's ridiculous and what's not is entirely up to Black Francis in this case--after all, we take his screaming about french dogs seriously, don't we? Upon further investigation, the absurdity melts into a gorgeous, fractured imagery of the lost and the hunted.
Upon first listening to Trompe Le Monde, I was surprised at how reminescent it was of the Jesus and Mary Chain's Automatic--even without the cover of Head On, the two albums would have a lot in common. And this cover is one of the rare cases where, when returning to the original version, something seems missing--Joey Santiago's solo is far more melodic than the original version, and, I fear to say it, improves the song. And may I burn in hell for saying it, but I like the cover better. There, it's out. I can already see the mob in the distance, lighting their torches and gathering pitchforks.
Other highlights include U-Mass, with its awful, twisted dance beat and the only time I've heard words for the female genitalia shouted eloquently; Bird Dream of the Olympus Mons, where Kim Deal's bassline again proves her worth to the band (as if it were ever doubted); and the spectacular goth-night-club sprawl of a song, Subbacultcha, whose female protagonist is lauded as "looking like an erotic vulture". Honestly, though, I could count each of the tracks as a highlight in itself.
So, if you're brave enough, roll up your car windows and hide your wallet and go for it--Trompe Le Monde is something that needs to be seen, and is worth the trip.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pixies' Final Hurrah (and possibly their best), July 30, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
The Pixies completely changed the way I listen to music. No other band has made me appreciate so many other kinds of music, from surf and rockabilly to punk to folk. So let it be said that "Trompe Le Monde" is their most fun and grandiose record. Every Pixies fan has their favorite. Critics adore "Surfer Rosa", fans love "Doolittle" and "Bossanova", but "Trompe Le Monde" is the one record that from start to end fits like a puzzle, and each piece is crucial. "Motorway to Roswell" is one of the greatest Pixies songs ever, and "Alec Eiffel" is amazing as well. The Pixies saved their best record for last.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorite Pixies Album, May 20, 2004
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Heck, it's one of my favorite albums, period. Hard to believe that after the first time I listened to this album ten years ago, I thought it was a joke. Honestly. It all just sounded so...wrong. It seriously crossed my mind that, knowing they were breaking up, decided to release an intentionally horrible, sonically stupid record, just to see if people would say they like it cuz it's the Pixies.
Well, like many incredible albums, this one took a while to grow on me. Today, it's one of my top 10. I can't understand how so many fans don't count this one as being in the same leauge as Surfer and Doolittle. Yes, Kim Deal seems to be less involved, and as much as I always thought her voice was their secret weapon, the songs are just too good to hold that against them.
I will agree that if you're new to the band, start with one of the earlier CDs first. This album is, to me, like a graduate course for Pixie fans. Once you've heard their other music (all great, mind you), you can handle this one. Perhaps I took the course too early, which accounted for my initial dislike.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the greatest punk/sci-fi record ever!, July 17, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
It's hard to believe it's already almost a decade since the release of Trompe le Monde and the sad demise soon afterwards of the greatest band rock music has ever known. I remember the mixed reviews at the time, and I remember playing it for the first time and being blown away by its power. Trompe le Monde, in my view, surpassed the brilliance of every other Pixies' album: a kind of controlled madness runs through some of the most enchanting and haunting melodies ever recorded. From the pulsating brutality of Planet of Sound to the mesmerising imagery of Motorway to Roswell this record paints pictues of a fantastical universe that is both bleak and magnificent. A great, great album that is simply light years ahead.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The happiest Pixies album, June 26, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Trompe Le Monde is both the culmination of the Pixies signature sound and a departure from that sound. In true Pixies fashion, songs alternate between the loud and thrashing and the slower and the melodic, all sewn together with excellent pop and rock sensibilities. By the time Trompe Le Monde was released, the Pixies had truely mastered this, and consequently each song is an exceddingly tight composition, making for a very consistent listen, especially compared to earlier Pixies releases.
So if this is the culmination of the Pixie's sound why do so many fans dislike it compared to the early albums? Is it the lack of Kim Deal's backing vocals, as many suggest? Probably not. Deal's wonderful vocals still come in at all the right places and actually make both individual songs and the album stronger when they are used in moderation. What many have overlooked, however, is the drastic change in subject matter. While past releases were much darker, with a focus on death, religion and self-mutilation, Trompe Le Monde's subtle science fiction theme, by contrast, seems down right dreamy and idealistic.
Then, of course, there's "Letter To Memphis," a rocking love song that, unlike other Pixie's love odes, isn't sarcastic. This newfound sincerity and more straight ahead rock approach succeeds. Trompe Le Monde is the Pixies most accessible album, and manages this feat without sacrificing any of the band's signature sound. It's still incredibly unique and exciting music, but, who would have thought it, it's a Pixie's album that will put you in a good mood as well. It may not be as essential as the earlier Pixies albums, but it is by far their best.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trompe Le Monde!!!, December 20, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Since first hearing this album in '91, I always wondered what the title 'Trompe Le Monde' meant. Turns out the translation is something along the lines of 'fool the world.'
Few fans of the Pixies seem to find this album as memorable as the earlier ones, but I have to disagree. In fact, after some long deliberation, I find that 'Trompe Le Monde' is my favorite. Some say that it's more produced than their previous work. There are definitely more complex layers of sound, with keyboards augmenting the usual lineup (a taste of Frank Black's musical direction to come). But the resulting sound produces what I would call both the Pixies heaviest and weirdest album.
The opening title track is brief, yet hook-laden, and irresistable. 'Planet of Sound' though never one of my faves is a great rocker, and was definitely a highlight of the live shows. 'Alec Eiffel' gives us a taste of the band's loopy pop stylings ala 'Dig For Fire,' while 'The Sad Punk' starts off as the closest thing the band ever did to hardcore. One of the greatest things about 'Trompe Le Monde' is that the album isn't front-loaded with all the best tracks; the entire disc is solid, and some of the later songs, like 'Letter to Memphis,' 'Space (I Believe In),' and 'Motorway to Roswell' are among the Pixies' best.
If it's true that 'Trompe Le Monde' was a predominantly Black Francis affair (with the omission of Kim Deal's usual vocal stylings in many cases, and the addition of other players), then it looks like he really may have 'fooled the world.'
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trompe Le Monde, April 24, 2005
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Trompe Le Monde (Audio CD)
Yes....so I got this album about a year ago and I already owned all of the other pixies albums. All I can say is that I was blown away by this album...its my favorite from the pixies (ok its tied with Doolittle.)The songs might not have the same magic that was in their first 2 albums, but they are so damn catchy I dont care. Songs like Alec Eiffel, The Sad Punk, and Subbacultcha just keep on going through my head! THis is definitely the most immediately addicting pixies album if not the best so get it now!
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Trompe Le Monde
Trompe Le Monde by Pixies (Audio CD - 2003)
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