Trouble
 
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Trouble

January 28, 2014

$6.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
Nightingale
4:23
2
Going Out
3:34
3
I Miss Your Bones
4:08
4
Inauguration
2:09
5
Rockets and Jets
4:00
6
Sullivan
4:05
7
It's Not Serious
2:53
8
Last Words
6:28
9
Sunship
4:16
10
Call Me After
2:09
11
Bet (Bonus Track)
3:03

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 28, 2014
  • Label: Merge Records
  • Copyright: 2014 Merge Records
  • Total Length: 41:08
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00HV0X6US
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,770 Paid in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 Paid in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
Most of all, I just plain like it a lot.
Phil in Vermont
Definitely would recommend it to all interested in great sounding music from very talented and versatile musicians.
Susan N. Sanders
I loved Hospitality's self-titled debut instantly, so I eagerly awaited this album.
P. Rickter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 28, 2014
Format: Audio CD
Hospitality is a trio hailing from Brooklyn, consisting of singer-songwriter Amber Paini along with Nathan Michel and Brian Betancourt. If you're not familiar with the band's sound, think Camera Obscura done Brooklyn style. Two years ago, the band released an intriguing debut album, after which they toured relentlessly. Now finally comes the band's new album.

"Trouble" (10 tracks; 38 min.) kicks off with a guitar-heavy "Nightingale", eventually evolving into and showcasing Paini's vocals. Nothing on the first album sounded this heavy. The contrast with the next song couldn't be bigger, a gently rocking "Going Out". "I Miss Your Bones" somehow made me think of an early Cranberries song. The first half of the album is capped with "Rockets and Jets". Into the second half of the album, "Sullivan" finds Paini almost a cappella for a good part of the song. After a short "It's Not Serious", we get to the KEY song of the album, the 6+ min. epic "Last Words", a synth-heavy slowburner that tells the world Hospitality has matured/evolved since its debut album. It's my favorite track on the album. After this, the last 2 songs pale in comparison, even if they are not bad per se. In all, this is a very solid second album from the Brooklyn trio. No sophomore slump for these guys!

I had the good fortune of seeing Hospitality in concert in the Fall of 2012 at the MidPoint Music Festival here in Cincinnati, in the midst of their tour in support of the debut album. Live they performed as a foursome, and they put on a fabulous show full of energy. Can't wait to see Hospitality in concert again at some point, to see how the new songs from "Trouble" resonate in a live setting. Meanwhile, "Trouble" is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Charlie Quaker on February 21, 2014
Format: Audio CD
2nd album from New York band—eclectic, melody-driven indie pop/rock with a gentle edge of
dissonance and angular rhythms—all led by the expressive voice of Amber Papini and
augmented by guitars, synthesizers, strings & horns. Recalls bands like the Throwing Muses,
the Delgados, Camera Obscura, Tiny Vipers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Rickter on March 6, 2014
Format: MP3 Music
I loved Hospitality's self-titled debut instantly, so I eagerly awaited this album. But after my first listen to "Trouble" I was sort of ho-hum about it. It took a few listens to the album for me to warm up to it, but it's definitely a solid followup to their first album -- a classical example of a "grower." Just give it time to let it grow on you and you won't be disappointed.

The things that made me like Hospitality the first time around are still there: Amber Papini's vocals and their catchy power-pop sound. But this time they push a little out of their comfort zone -- I'm particularly thinking about the fascinating track "Last Words," with its synth-heavy sound plus a very nice guitar solo by Nathan Michel. There are plenty of pop hooks here too, but it's clear that this band is comfortable exploring a wider field of the musical landscape than their oh so catchy first album. I recommend exploring with them.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By epsix on January 28, 2014
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
With Trouble, you lose some of the Pop sounds that you got on Hospitality's first album, but that's okay. The sound is hip, but melodic; does that make sense? The beats are repetitive, but not annoying. I enjoyed the lyrics, as they felt less college freshman. I like they way this band's progressing, I just hope, going forward, they can keep some of the sounds they made off earlier tracks, like Monkey, which are largely absent, here.

Overall: 4 stars for keeping it classy.
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"Trouble" sounds like a prototypical second album in the vein of "More Songs about Buildings and Food", with a clutch of holdovers that didn't make the first album and a few tracks that point the way to a new sound. If there's any problem here is that breezy guitar pop numbers never really mesh with the extended coldwave workouts. There's an oil and water effect that will take multiple listens to sort out. However, I can't say there's a bad song to be found, and as time goes on "Trouble" will only sound stronger.

Lead off track "Nightingale" tries to corral both sounds into a cohesive whole, and works rather well transitioning from bright opening chords, gnarled riffing, atmospherics, solemn verses, soaring choruses, and finally vintage mellotron. A more subtle crossing is "I Miss Your Bones" that uses the same instrumentation as their guitar pop but bent into the coldwave configuration, extended with a percolating baseline. "Rockets and Jets" is the key song of the new style, and the album proper, and shows Hospitality is already adept at this kind of groove.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
i love the first album. love it. it was my life soundtrack for a few months so i was really anticipating this release. I was not let down. with a harder sound and darker feel, Trouble takes you out of spring and right into fall. The music is a bit more rough yet still very catchy. The vocals are on point and I cant wait to drown my ears in this for the next few months.
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By Phil in Vermont on March 26, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I first discovered Hospitality through their cover of Rikki Don't Lose That Number on AV Club. They at times almost sounded like amateurs but a closer listening revealed beautiful complex ideas and intentional, very talented musicians. Their self titled album is a great pop album with melody and great sounds galore. The new album Trouble is quite a departure but holy cow I love it. On the first few listens it feels as ground breaking as Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot but a bit more out there. Pop meets folk meets Gary Numan and tours with The Greatful Dead. Most of all, I just plain like it a lot.
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