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Troubled Water: Race, Mutiny, and Bravery on the USS Kitty Hawk Paperback – Bargain Price, November 9, 2010


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Troubled Water: Race, Mutiny, and Bravery on the USS Kitty Hawk + Sailors to the End: The Deadly Fire on the USS Forrestal and the Heroes Who Fought It + The Forgotten 500: The Untold Story of the Men Who Risked All for the Greatest Rescue Mission of World War II
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (November 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230103391
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230103399
  • ASIN: B0093MUFH4
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.7 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,732,176 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Troubled Water:
 
“Even though the U.S. government continues to deny it, Gregory Freeman has dug out the true hidden story of the first mutiny in the history of the U.S. Navy. You’ll enjoy this high seas thriller.”—James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers, Flyboys, and The Imperial Cruise
 
"This is a real nail-biter, a genuine page-turner. Just when you thought you had heard everything about carrier operations during the Vietnam War, here is the story of the mutiny that the US Navy didn't want you to know about. Page, by agonizing page, you are below deck as everything unravels and everything you thought you knew proves to be wrong. It's always exciting to read a book that provides new or overlooked information about events you thought were set in stone within the historical record, but in Troubled Water, Gregory Freeman not only tells you about it, he takes you there -- aboard the USS Kitty Hawk, as mutineers gradually alter the course of an American warship from measured precision to chaos and anarchy."-- Bill Yenne, Author of Aces High, the Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of WWII. and Rising Sons: The Japanese-American GIs Who Fought for the US in WWII
 

"Gregory Freeman is a master of riveting and thoughtful examinations of military sagas that no one else has the courage to take on. Troubled Water is his finest book in a distinguished career."--Gregg Olsen, author of Heart of Ice and A Wicked Snow

 
Praise for Gregory A. Freeman's previous works:
 
Sailors to the End:
 
"A doozy of a story."--Atlanta Journal-Constitution
 
"[A] thorough, absorbing account."--Library Journal
 
 “An excellent book... Freeman does an admirable job of relating this story that has been untold for too long.”--The Springfield (IL) State Journal-Register (Sailors to the End)
 
The Forgotten 500:
 
“Exciting…breathtaking.”--Booklist

“Fascinating…full of romance, action, and adventure…told with skill and grace.”--America in WWII
 

About the Author

Gregory A. Freeman is an award-winning writer with more than 25 years experience in journalism and historical nonfiction. He has won over two dozen awards for his writing, including the coveted Sigma Delta Chi Award for Excellence from the Society of Professional Journalists. His books include The Forgotten 500: The Untold Story of The Men Who Risked All for the Greatest Rescue Mission of World War II, Lay This Body Down: The 1921 Murders of Eleven Plantation Slaves, and the acclaimed Sailors to the End: The Deadly Fire on the USS Forrestal and the Heroes Who Fought it. He lives in Roswell, Georgia.


More About the Author

Gregory A. Freeman is an award-winning writer with more than 25 years experience in journalism and narrative nonfiction. Known for writing books that make a true story read like a gripping, fast paced novel, Freeman is quickly becoming one of the most respected and successful authors in the field of narrative nonfiction.

Freeman's books are scrupulously researched and entirely factual, yet they read more like novels because he weaves the "stranger than fiction" personal stories of his subjects into a compelling narrative. Each project requires intensive research - getting to know the subjects personally and probing for previously undisclosed documents. Freeman also explores the subject matter himself, whether that means flying onto the deck of an aircraft carrier at sea or gaining access to the most restricted parts of the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison. But the most important parts of the books are the often intensely personal, emotional interviews with the men and women who were there. Their personal stories make up the heart of Freeman's work, the part that most connects with the reader.

In addition to his books, Freeman writes for a wide range of magazines and other publications, including Reader's Digest, Rolling Stone, American History, and World War II.

Freeman has won more than a dozen awards for his writing, including the coveted Sigma Delta Chi Award for Excellence from the Society of Professional Journalists - twice in five years. He attended the University of Georgia in Athens and began his writing career there, working for newspapers while studying journalism and political science.

After receiving his degree, he went on to work for The Associated Press in Atlanta and then spent several years as executive editor of a publishing company. He then became a freelance writer, editor, and author.

Known for writing narrative nonfiction that makes a true story read like a gripping, fast paced novel, Freeman's latest work is The Gathering Wind: Hurricane Sandy, the Sailing Ship Bounty, and a Courageous Rescue at Sea, released October 29, 2013, by New American Library, an imprint of Penguin Books. This book tells the story of the tall sailing Bounty, which was lost off the coast of North Carolina during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Answering many of the questions prompted by that terrible loss, The Gathering Wind is a compelling drama about the crew, the Coast Guard rescuers, and the investigations that followed.

Freeman's earlier book The Last Mission of the Wham Bam Boys tells the story of a World War II bomber crew that is shot down over Germany and then lynched by local townspeople, leading to the first war crimes trial after the conflict ended. Kirkus Reviews called it "A chilling tale" and "a riveting narrative."

Freeman also published Troubled Water: Race, Mutiny and Bravery on the USS Kitty Hawk in September 2009, also with Palgrave Macmillan. Troubled Water tells a little known story of a race riot on the carrier Kitty Hawk in 1972, focusing on the two senior officers who will determine whether this already tragic episode ends peacefully or spirals down into one of the darkest moments in Navy history. Just prior to that, Freeman co-authored a book with Col. Larry C. James, the U.S. Army psychologist who was sent to stop the abuse at the notorious military prison in Abu Ghraib, Iraq. Fixing Hell: An Army Psychologist Confronts Evil at Abu Ghraib, released in August 2008, tells the harrowing tale of a man struggling to be both a military officer and a medical professional, while also revealing previously unknown details about the prison scandal and how the system was improved.

James Bradley, bestselling author of Flags of Our Fathers, Flyboys, and The Imperial Cruise praises Freeman as a talented author whose books provide an important service to the country. Bradley says of Freeman's latest, Troubled Water: "Gregory Freeman has dug out the true hidden story of the first mutiny in the history of the U.S. Navy. You'll enjoy this high-seas thriller."

Freeman won wide acclaim for The Forgotten 500: The Untold Story of the Men Who Risked All for the Greatest Rescue Mission of World War II, published in 2007 by New American Library. This popular book tells the fascinating but previously unknown story of Operation Halyard, a super secret and ultra risky rescue mission to save downed American airmen in Nazi-occupied Yugoslavia. Malcolm McConnell, #1 New York Times bestselling coauthor of American Soldier, says of The Forgotten 500: "Freeman chronicles [the story] with a master's touch for detail. Although this book reads like a fast paced novel, it is based on scores of probing interviews and meticulous archival research." Gregg Olsen, New York Times bestselling author of The Deep Dark, says The Forgotten 500 is "a literary and journalistic achievement of the highest order, a book that illuminates, thrills and reminds us that heroes sometimes do live among us. It will take your breath away."

Before that, Freeman saw great success with Sailors to the End: The Deadly Fire on the USS Forrestal and the Heroes Who Fought It, originally published in July 2002 by William Morrow. In Sailors to the End, Freeman tells the story of the young men aboard an aircraft carrier in 1967, following their life-and-death struggles through an accidental fire that threatens to destroy the world's most powerful ship. Sailors to the End was enthusiastically embraced by the military community and general interest readers alike. One reviewer said, "The book grabs readers and leaves them emotionally exhausted. In particular, the description of the death of sailor James Blaskis in a remote and inaccessible part of the ship cannot leave a reader unmoved." A Kirkus Reviews writer called Sailors to the End "a compassionate account of a dramatic incident in modern naval history, told with cinematic immediacy and narrative skill." Senator John McCain, who was injured in the fire, endorsed the book and called it "a riveting account" that honors the men who died.

In Lay This Body Down: The 1921 Murders of Eleven Plantation Slaves, Freeman paints a vivid picture of a plantation run with slave labor 56 years after the Civil War. Melissa Fay Greene, author of The Temple Bombing and Praying for Sheetrock, called Lay This Body Down a "magnificently well-written book." Library Journal's Robert C. Jones wrote that "this moving narrative account is arguably the most complete history of this event available."

See the author's web site at www.gregoryafreeman.com.

Customer Reviews

Good job Mr. Freeman...Good Job!!.
Joseph R. Calamia
Gregory A. Freeman's Troubled Water: Race, Mutiny and Bravery on the USS Kitty Hawk is one of the most riveting books I've read, perhaps ever.
Robert Busko
From early on there are far too many inaccuracies to make the book a true report of the events occurring during this incident.
Jay Wilson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. Cruiser on January 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was there on the Kitty Hawk during this incident. I would have to say, reading this book gave me a bit of closure on some of the events of that horrific night. The author did an excellent job giving the this reader accurate details. It is an easy read and I would suggest those that want to know what really happened, this book will give the reader the view from those that were there...not the "government'" side of the story.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. Gordon on October 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While Troubled Water graphically described a relatively small but violent race riot that broke out aboard the USS Kitty Hawk in 1972, really the aircraft carrier is but a backdrop for a much larger story. If one was to read the book and conclude that the author, Gregory Freeman, presented a microcosm of race relations as they then existed in the armed forces, one would have missed the point of the story. Really, and Freeman made the point, Troubled Water described the consequences of the Defense Department's Project 100,000, a program "set out to recruit primarily inner-city youths who were previously considered ineligible for military service because of low test scores," past drug use, and criminal convictions.

Implemented by President Johnson in 1966 as part of the War on Poverty, Project 100,000 set a of goal of recruiting 40,000 previously unqualified applicants for entry into the armed forces. Thereafter, 100,000 recruits per annum would be accepted with the goal being to use the military as a catalyst to elevate people, primarily minorities, out of poverty. The Project ended in 1971 after 354,000 men had entered the armed forces under the less rigorous standards. According to Freeman, the Navy found "that many Project 100,000 recruits . . . were not useful assets" and that there was "no evidence to support the hypothesis that military service offer[ed] a `leg up'" to disadvantaged youth who lacked the necessary intellectual capacities to perform within military environments. The Project, said Freeman, "was one reason why the Kitty Hawk was staffed with plenty of disgruntled black sailors who had little to lose by disobeying orders or performing poorly.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robert Busko VINE VOICE on June 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Gregory A. Freeman's Troubled Water: Race, Mutiny and Bravery on the USS Kitty Hawk is one of the most riveting books I've read, perhaps ever. That a modern aircraft carrier on station off the coast of Vietnam in 1972 can have a riot occur between black and white sailors is nearly unfathomable. As a former Marine, used to following orders and respecting my officers and NCO's, the thought that a group of sailors could not only beat their shipmates but jeopardize operations in a combat zone is simply beyond understanding.

Freeman does a wonderful job with a technically difficult subject. Writing this account not only requires some understanding of the time in which they happened, but also the purpose of the Kitty Hawk as a tool of war and American policy. Interviews with participants (shall we call them survivors?) is also required, not to mention reading through the official investigation results. The author is on top of his game.

The Navy apparently doesn't want to use the term mutiny for obvious reasons. Mutiny is a legal term that conjures out of control crews taking a ship and killing the captain and his loyal subordinates. Of course, that didn't happen in this case, so technically I suppose the Navy's boast of a mutiny never occurring on an American naval vessel is in tact. However, this incident, and a later incident on the USS Constellation certainly comes awfully close. Participants were tried and many convicted

Freeman also looks into some of the complaints that the black crewman had that they used to justify their actions. The captain of the Kitty Hawk, Capt. Marland W. `Doc' Townsend, and the XO, Benjamin W.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jay Wilson on October 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is generally a flawed book. From early on there are far too many inaccuracies to make the book a true report of the events occurring during this incident. I will preface by saying that I was not on this cruise, but was on the Kitty Hawk just prior to the events that take place. First off, Freeman says that the cruise was off to a bad start by leaving a week early for deployment. That is not the case. The Kitty Hawk was not scheduled to leave for West Pac and Vietnam until some many months later than it went. This was an emergency given the increased NVC activity. I never heard of any news bulletins ordering everyone back to report back to the ship. I did received a phone call at home on leave on Monday. The ship left Thursday. I will assume that there may have been some who were notified by TV rather than by direct order. (I was given the option of staying with my squadron as it depolyed or transferring to the wing in San Diego for the remainder of my activation. I took the later course.) Could the fact that the ship left early have caused general unrest among the entire crew? That is not examined.
The author gives the repeated impression that the ship never makes port or liberty call, saying that the length of the cruise was record breaking. That the entire cruise, from San Diego back may have been record breaking is not the same as being 'on the line.' 45 to 60 days between port call was not unusual for carriers during the Vietnam war, but there was always some port call, and liberty. During this cruise the Kitty Hawk went to Hong Kong for a port call, among other places. As such, again, this is not made clear at all. Still, West Pac deployments were generally 9 months long.
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