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Trout Fishing in America Paperback – Bargain Price, January 19, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; 1 edition (January 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547255276
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547255279
  • ASIN: B0058M8JX0
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,866,895 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

* Streets ahead of Burroughs or Kerouac Observer * A book infused with a bucolic surrealism and mournful psychedelia that has very little to do with trout fishing and a lot to do with the lamenting of a passing pastoral America. An instant cult classic Financial Times * Delicate, fantastic and very funny -- Malcolm Bradbury * He writes with a kind of free-wheeling, zany magic Guardian * A master of American black absurdism Financial Times --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Richard Brautigan (1935-1984) was a god of the counterculture and the author of ten novels, nine volumes of poetry, and a collection of short stories.

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Customer Reviews

It is the sweetest book I've ever read.
Jim in Northern California
It is a well written narrative, with a truly bizarre subject matter and many moments of humor and human drama.
Mark Pollock
It's been over 20 years since I read this book.
tyoung@interconnect.net

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By vanishingpoint on November 21, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What a strange, strange book. Don't know how to classify this thing -- it's not a novel, not a string of related short stories, not nonfiction. And what about the style? It's kind of like magical realism, but not really.
Trout Fishing is one of those works that you end up describing in a circumscribed, roundabout, what-it's-not kind of way. The title of the book is used many times over -- "Trout Fishing in America Shorty"; "Trout Fishing in America Terrorists". And Brautigan seems to love scatalogical references, many of the hilarious chapters talking about outhouses and toilets. I can't help but to think that this work is the result of being under some external influence, i.e., drugs or alcohol, probably the latter since Brautigan was known to be a boozer.
One thing for sure, I've never come across a work like this, and I'm not sure if I ever will. I'm not exactly sure what I was supposed to "get" out of this book, but it sure was an enjoyable read. Brautigan's concent may be strangely warped, but his writing is clean, crip, and sometimes quite beautiful. The best chapters:
Red Lip
The Kool-Aid Wino
Trout Fishing in America Terrorists
The Shipping of Trout Fishing in American Shorty to Nelson Algren
The Hunchback Trout
Room 208, Hotel Trout Fishing in America
Trout Fishing on the Street of Eternity
Footnote Chapter to "Red Lip"
The Cleveland Wrecking Yard
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Dan Williams on January 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Watermelon sugar, for me, has been more than a good read -- it has been an obsession. In college I wrote a twenty-page research paper on the subject... and Brautigan's style in this work particularly has continued to fascinate me. So often Brautigan's name is associted with his first success, "Trout Fishing in America." Critics of his time seemed also to be preoccupied with it, to the detriment of his better work. Brautigan himself seemed at times to flaunt that work as a kind of mantlepiece throughout his life.
Folly, I think; In Watermelon Sugar is clearly his best work -- a book as unique as "Trout Fishing," but with the added touch of a uniquely woven plot, something "Fishing" surely lacks.
Myth and Symbolism are handled by Brautigan with the hand of a child at play in a dream. To truly appreciate the book, Brautigan insists that you yourself become like that dreaming child, reaching back toward a place you thought you had forgotten. For instance, does anyone remember associating days of the week with certain colors? What color was Wednsday?
In "In Watermelon Sugar," the sun shines a different color every day, beckoning us back to the hidden realm of things lost but not forgotten -- a place we will never forget...
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By diana barnes-brown on August 24, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read In Watermelon Sugar on recommendation from a good friend who, like me, is a writer. He simply handed me the slim volume and said, "This is good. Read it." After reading the book, this seems quite an apt introduction. Brautigan deals in exquisite simplicities, spare statements and commands expressing the day-to-day of human life and interaction, and he captures these moments with a striking clarity that leaves no opportunity for disagreement. Yet he frames these details in a world so odd they stand out precisely because of their normalcy. His characters live in a place where everything is made out of watermelon sugar, tigers can talk, and the sun shines a different color every day. Within this odd landscape, Brautigan foregrounds and examines the finer points of human life with a poet's voice and a clever eye. While his words are tender, his wit is sharp and wry, and the combination makes the book a richly textured read, deeply satisfying for anyone with a love of language or life.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Shmizzle on December 12, 2005
Format: Paperback
I'm 15 years old and I read this book because there was a referance to it in another book I was reading(I Know This Much is True--another 5-star book) and it sounded intriguing.

Being someone who analyzes things to death, I knew right away that this is the kind of book that you will have your own opinions about and no one's opinions are wrong. For example, I think that iDeath was supposed to symoblize Heaven and the Forgotten Works was Earth(what's been "forgotten")

Anyhoo, the book is a rare work of art and one of the most inspiring works of literature to ever be published.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By amiracle on May 4, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First of all, to the iDON'T reviewer below me, I meant to click YES after your review but accidently clicked NO. Sorry, I thought it was a good review.

In Watermelon Sugar will mean different things to different people. It's how Brautigan intended it, in the same way the speaker's name "depends on you." Ultimately, there can be no key or legend for decoding the book's message. I find it means something a little different to me each day.

But what we can do, and what the book is possibly encouraging us to, is ask ourselves what iDEATH is, what the Forgotten Works are, and why there aren't any tigers anymore, and to share our impressions with one another. To listen to and learn about each other.

inBOIL achieves his goal and there is purpose in his death. But the speaker never finishes his statue and there seems no purpose in his life. And what about Margaret? You tell me. Maybe she's the sane one, after all.

What Brautigan does with language is also worthy of attention. Many of his expressions are violations of pragmatic conventions, that is to say days don't have colors and lanterns aren't tigers or boys. But why not, really? Because we're conditioned to think things aren't that way? Because this is how language restricts the way we conceptualize the world?

Is there a reason iDEATH bears so ominous a name? Maybe, maybe not. You decide. College professors love James Joyce. If you read his stories enough times and peruse all the commentaries written about them, you can truly understand what everything means, what the characters represent, and all the other hidden secrets. That seems to me to be the main reason why Joyce is held in such high esteem. It's also the reason why I don't much appreciate his writing.
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